Cantus In Angustiis (Chant In Times Of Tribulation)
  • francisfrancis
    Posts: 9,937
    OK... here is a almost complete 5 signature booklet not including cover (6 sheets total). I have a few versions of a st michael chant which may go in the space left. Next is paginatiion.

    @CatherineS
    What is the origination of the St. Gabriel chant?

    (old file removed, new file further down in thead)
  • CatherineS
    Posts: 690
    The GABC tools are very cool. I'm slightly underwater, but have it done. Can someone check that there's nothing dumb or atonal in here by accident? I played it on the keyboard to double check...

    name: ;
    user-notes: ;
    commentary: ;
    annotation: ;
    centering-scheme: english;
    %fontsize: 12;
    %spacing: smith;
    %font: OFLSortsMillGoudy;
    %width: 4.5;
    %height: 11;
    %%
    (cb4)San(f)cte(f) Ga(h)bri(i)el(hg) cum(e) Ma(f)ri(g.)a(f.;)
    San(f)cte(f) Ra(h)pha(i)-()el(hg) cum(e) To(f)bi(g.)a(f.;)
    San(h)cte(i) Mi(j)cha(k)-()el(ji,) cum(h) cæ(i)le(j)sti(i)bus(h) hi(i)e(h)rar(g)chi(h.)a(g.;)
    Sit(f) sem(h)per(i) no(h)bi(g)scum(e) in(f) vi(g.)a.(f.) (::)
    A(fgf)men.(ef..) (::)

    If I choose "PDF" or "EPS" from the Illuminare Score Editor it introduces weird glitches that I don't see in the preview, like the ; bar running up against the last note of the phrase before. How do I export it nicely?

    --

    The text is a prayer a priest friend of mine uses in Latin when going out (on a trip, in a taxi, etc.). I've heard another priest speak the same prayer in Portuguese during a procession on the feast of the Archangels. But I don't know many people who know it. I taught it to a friend and he wanted a melody, so I made one up. I've never heard anyone sing it.
  • francisfrancis
    Posts: 9,937
    Cool... I am glad people are using this tool.

    If you move the Do clef down to the third line, you will not need the flat sign any more.

    I can put your name (or a pseudonym) in as a credit if you want. Also, do you want a copyright notice for your composition? Although the booklet is going out to public domain, your lone piece can have a copyright attached to it. If there is high demand for your work in the future, you could license it out.
  • francisfrancis
    Posts: 9,937
    Crum...

    I posted the wrong file above... here is the most recent one. @CatherineS, your piece is already in this version, but we can use the GABC version next.

    Also, to keep it purely Latin, Maria should prob be Mariae... not sure about Tobia.

    I just threw in google translation at the moment, so adjust to your preference.

    (old file removed, new file further down in thead)
  • chonakchonak
    Posts: 8,921
    I didn't have a suggestion for the title before, but I do now. These aren't really daily chants for general use. Some of them are specifically for Lent or Septuagesima, or for times of pestilence. Maybe the title should be something like "Chants for a time of tribulations" / "Cantus in angustiis". (I'm recalling Haydn's Latin name for the Lord Nelson Mass, "Missa in angustiis".)

    NB: Don't trust Google Translate for anything you want to distribute to fellow Catholics (i.e., to the public). It will probably be mostly right; but for a booklet of prayers, mostly right isn't enough.
  • francisfrancis
    Posts: 9,937
    @chonak

    true...or

    Chants In Times of Tribulation

    I never trust google for translations. I just use it for a placeholder... (similar to 'lorem ipsum')... it is up to the composer to get the translation right in this instance if possible.

    I am thinking 'grace' would still be appropriate so that the food is 'blessed'

    thanks again
  • francisfrancis
    Posts: 9,937
    OK... better title (thanks to chonak)... more appropriate

    there is room for one or two very small pieces and if anyone has translations for what is missing, that would be helpful.

    (old file removed, new file further down in thead)
  • StimsonInRehabStimsonInRehab
    Posts: 1,821
    Francis, as far as the verses for Media Vita, this is a rough translation:

    1. In You did our fathers hope; they hoped, and they were set free.
    2. To You did our fathers cry; they cried, and they were not confounded.
    Thanked by 1francis
  • chonakchonak
    Posts: 8,921
    The Latin title for the Litany of Loreto is "Litaniae Lauretanae"; it is conventional to use this plural form in this case.
    Thanked by 1francis
  • StimsonInRehabStimsonInRehab
    Posts: 1,821
    Perhaps you could put in the Benedictine Ultima in Mortis Hora?
    Thanked by 1CatherineS
  • a_f_hawkins
    Posts: 3,063
    Verses for Media Vita, some choices
    VULM Psalm 21:5 in te speraverunt patres nostri speraverunt et liberasti eos
    RSV Psalm 22:4 In thee our fathers trusted; they trusted, and thou didst deliver them.
    KJV Psalm 22:4 Our fathers trusted in thee: they trusted, and thou didst deliver them.
    COV Psalm 22:4 Our fathers hoped in thee: they trusted in thee, and thou didst deliver them.
    NAB Psalm 22:5 In you our fathers trusted; they trusted and you rescued them.

    VULM Psalm 21:6 ad te clamaverunt et salvi facti sunt in te speraverunt et non sunt confusi
    RSV Psalm 22:5 To thee they cried, and were saved; in thee they trusted, and were not disappointed.
    KJV Psalm 22:5 They cried unto thee, and were delivered: they trusted in thee, and were not confounded.
    COV Psalm 22:5 They called upon thee, and were holpen: they put their trust in thee, and were not confounded.
    NAB Psalm 22:6 To you they cried out and they escaped; in you they trusted and were not disappointed.
  • Richard MixRichard Mix
    Posts: 2,536
    CatherineS,

    I'd recommend always enclosing barlines in their own parentheses thus:
    (cb4)San(f)cte(f) Ga(h)bri(i)el(hg) cum(e) Ma(f)ri(g.)a(f.) (;)

    The space prevents an unwanted hyphen at the end of the word. You might already know about z & Z:
    hi(i)e(h)rar(g)chi(h.)a(g.) (;z)
    Thanked by 1CatherineS
  • CatherineS
    Posts: 690
    Oh, thanks Richard. The extra parentheses sorted the crowding problem. I also had some 'manual override' hyphens in there that didn't need to be there, so I took them out.

    I am not convinced about the key. If I do C3, then it comes out la la do re do... instead of fa fa la si(b) la.... but I'm quite possibly confused, so please do clarify... playing it on a keyboard the interval pattern I want is: FA FA LA SI(b) LA SO MI FA SO FA.

    I think in the earlier version I sent to Francis I had some kind of mangled clef going on, too. :P
  • CatherineS
    Posts: 690
    Francis, no need for a credit. I am asking around about the Latin. If "cum" requires a change of case... and if it affects Maria, are Tobia and hierarchia similarly affected? I had a couple years of Latin when I was in my 20s, and I don't much remember the grammar.
    Thanked by 1francis
  • francisfrancis
    Posts: 9,937
    @CatherineS

    Moving the Do clef to the second line (C2 is what I meant), from the bottom moves the whole and half step relationship in the proper order as to your tune giving you a natural half step between notes mi and fa (therefore eliminating the need for a flat.)

    As per the Latin translation, I am not a language buff... I am musician, artist, craftsman, etc... perhaps someone here with that expertise can chime iin.
  • francisfrancis
    Posts: 9,937
    Revised version once again.

    I am going to see if there is a more condensed version of the Litany of Loretto.

    (old file removed, new file further down in thead)

    Thanked by 1CatherineS
  • CatherineS
    Posts: 690
    For the moment (awaiting possible updates to the possibly mistaken Latin), here is the latest code and PDF of Sancte Gabriel...

    name: ;
    user-notes: ;
    commentary: ;
    annotation: ;
    centering-scheme: english;
    %fontsize: 12;
    %spacing: smith;
    %font: OFLSortsMillGoudy;
    %width: 4.5;
    %height: 11;
    %%
    (c2)San(f)cte(f) Ga(h)bri(i)el(hg) cum(e) Ma(f)ri(g.)a(f.) (;)
    San(f)cte(f) Ra(h)pha(i)el(hg) cum(e) To(f)bi(g.)a(f.) (;)
    San(h)cte(i) Mi(j)cha(k)el(ji,) cum(h) cæ(i)le(j)sti(i)bus(h) hi(i)er(h)ar(g)chi(h.)a(g.) (;)
    Sit(f) sem(h)per(i) no(h)bi(g)scum(e) in(f) vi(g.)a.(f.) (::)
    A(fgf)men.(ef..) (::)

    Thanked by 1francis
  • francisfrancis
    Posts: 9,937
    latest version for review... cleaning up, cleaning up, making revisions, corrections, etc.

    (old file removed, new file further down in thead)
  • francisfrancis
    Posts: 9,937
    latest version with your most recent code @CatherineS

    (old file removed, new file further down in thead)
    Thanked by 1CatherineS
  • francisfrancis
    Posts: 9,937
    We NEED a chant to St. Joseph... he MUST be in here! Also, what about the sign of the cross or the doxology?
  • CatherineS
    Posts: 690
    What about Caelitum Joseph decus from Cantus Selecti? It has a repeating melody. It's praising, not petitioning though. It's on p 190.
    Thanked by 1Incardination
  • tomjaw
    Posts: 2,355
    What about the Litany of St. Joseph?

    EDIT. Here is a file of Litanies I have typed up, I suspect there may be errors... Although they have been proofread!
  • In addition to both of the above, Te Ioseph Celebrent.
  • francisfrancis
    Posts: 9,937
    I thought about Te Ioseph, but I was hoping for something that is intercessory and crying out for St. Joseph's aid. I will definitely create more pages with the pieces you are all suggesting, allowing people to mix and match the pieces they want to include, but is there an intercessory piece besides the Litany? Otherwise, the litany may be best.
  • a_f_hawkins
    Posts: 3,063
    There is a text in the Roman Ritual, presumably it can be chanted in a standard formula.

    God, who in your wondrous providence chose blessed Joseph as the spouse of your holy Mother; grant, we pray, that we may deserve to have him for our advocate in heaven whom we venerate as our defender here on earth. (Roman Ritual, blessing of a hospital)
  • CatherineS
    Posts: 690
    I just checked two old prayer books to see if there was something useful there. Both feature the litany of Saint Joseph. The portuguese one has a bunch of lovely prayers to Saint Joseph for various causes, including in sickness, for the agonizing, and for the Church, and a 'crown' (chaplet?) of 7 sorrows and 7 joys of St. Joseph; but nothing in Latin nor set to music. I checked the traditional hymnal and didn't find anything petition-y either.

    But I now am fascinated to spend more time with the old Brazilian prayer book (1934) to dig through its treasures.
  • francisfrancis
    Posts: 9,937
    holy cow...

    St. Joseph... highly underrated and scarcely called upon, how has the church forgotten the power of your intercession? come to our aid, o great protector in these times when the shepherds are being stricken and we are being scattered.
  • If you are including hymns...
    Dear St. Joseph
    Great St. Joseph
    O Blessed St. Joseph

    Thanked by 1francis
  • There is a Memorare to St. Joseph, if I recall, but I've never seen a Latin version and don't have the English in front of me.
    Thanked by 1francis
  • a_f_hawkins
    Posts: 3,063
    Thanked by 1francis
  • StimsonInRehabStimsonInRehab
    Posts: 1,821
    Another thought for you from Cantus Selecti-

    INVOCAVI DOMINUM, no. 151 on page *189.

    "Invocavi Dominm, * Patrem Domini mei. V. Ut non derelinquat me in die tribulationis. Gloria."

    Translates roughly to "Call upon the Lord, father of my Lord. That he may not abandon me in the day of tribulation. Glory be."
    Thanked by 2CatherineS francis
  • francisfrancis
    Posts: 9,937
    @StimsonInRehab

    have included the Invocavi Dominum with your rough translation. :) , added a few more graphics and cleaned up pages.

    (old file removed, new file further down in thead)
    Thanked by 1StimsonInRehab
  • francisfrancis
    Posts: 9,937
    OK

    This one has few more revisions including a ROUGH translation of St. Roche, which is very difficult to find out there on the interwebs. This is a translation (embedded in the pdf) is from google translate (from the italian...) if anyone knows italian or latin, perhaps they can help...

    Traduzione del testo:

    Ave, o Rocco santissimo,
    nato da sangue nobile,
    segnato da una croce
    a sinistra sul tuo petto.

    Rocco, andando pellegrino,
    guarivi coi miracoli
    le ferite della peste
    con un tocco salutare.

    Ave, o Santo angelico,
    tu mosso dallo Spirito
    ottenevi dal Signore
    di salvarci dalla peste.

    Testo in Latino

    Ave, Roche sanctissime.
    Nobili natus sanguigne,
    Crucis siguaris schemate
    Sinistro tuo latere.

    Roche profectus peregre
    Mortis actus pestiferae
    Curasti tu mirifice
    Tangendo salutifere.

    Vale, Roche angeliche,
    Vocis citatus flamine,
    Obtinuisti deifice
    A cunctis pestem pellere.

    V Ora pro nobis, Sancte Roche, Protector noster
    R Ut digni efficiamur promissionibus Christi.

    (old file removed, new file further down in thead)
    Thanked by 1Incardination
  • CatherineS
    Posts: 690
    I was just working on St. Roch with my godson. How's this:

    Hail, Great Saint Roch, noble by blood, signed with the Cross, on thy left side marked.

    St. Roch, pilgrim wandering afar, you miraculously cured those dying of the plague with your healing touch.

    Hail, angelic Saint Roch! With your prayerful voice you obtained holiness driving forth the plague.
  • Francis,

    Your translations often don't line up with the text they're translating. The Misit Dominus is a particularly egregious example.
  • CatherineS
    Posts: 690
    It might be enough to put the English above, below or to the side since it's not for singing, just for reference?
  • francisfrancis
    Posts: 9,937
    My idea with the translation is to give a general sense of the text which you are singing, not a literal translation of what is above... putting at the bottom would be quite a difficult task, but it is possible perhaps for later editions? I guess I am sensing that it is more important to get this out there asap... yes?

    @CatherineS

    Yes! Excellent translation... I am slapping in now.
  • francisfrancis
    Posts: 9,937
    Initial Print Files (Two Files)

    Covers
    Print one page of desired cover (English or Latin) on card stock

    Inside Pages
    Print inside pages two sided. It is paginated to create a 20 page booklet and if you print in order, it should come out correctly. Saddle stitch staple the center and you are good to chant. Let me know if it works for yall.

    ______

    These files are Edition Beta 1.0

    I will compile all comments and suggestions and massage the files until we get to the official 1st edition asap. Meanwhile, it is much more important that we all start singing asap... the world needs it desparately.

    (old files removed, new file further down in thead)
  • chonakchonak
    Posts: 8,921
    A tip about accent marks: you should omit them on titles, since the accents are not really part of the Latin text. They are only added as a pronunciation aid on the parts that are to be sung or spoken.
  • StimsonInRehabStimsonInRehab
    Posts: 1,821
    Thank you for all your hard work, Francis. I'll be singing it every day after Prime.
    Thanked by 2CatherineS francis
  • CatherineS
    Posts: 690
    General thanks to this whole forum, it's been really inspiring and helpful. Great creative folks doing good work. God bless you all.
  • francisfrancis
    Posts: 9,937
    Funny story... one person wanted both English and Latin covers... here is how I printed mine... (by accident, but I am keeping it.)
    3024 x 4032 - 2M
  • francisfrancis
    Posts: 9,937
    Covers with Double Titles...
    (old file removed, new file further down in thead)
  • bhcordovabhcordova
    Posts: 1,083
    Francis, it covers and book are all so beautiful! Wonderful work!
    Thanked by 1francis
  • francisfrancis
    Posts: 9,937
    @bhcordova...

    you are welcome... glad to be of some help in these trying times... now for an english rendition... what would be the musical counterpart of these pieces?
  • CCoozeCCooze
    Posts: 1,259
    @Francis, I (my 8yo, really, I was just going with it) found a mistake. Pages 19 & 20 contain the same parts of the Litany, rather than going on to the Agnus Dei, etc.
    Thanked by 1francis
  • chonakchonak
    Posts: 8,921
    And (while you're editing) the English title differs between the two title versions: one says, "Chant", the other, "Chants".
    Thanked by 1francis
  • francisfrancis
    Posts: 9,937
    BETA 1.1 (1st page of file will be marked... hope i remember to change it each time i make a rev.)
    -removed accent marks in titles
    -fixed last page of litany of the saints
    -added version designation
    -made english titles consistent (chant, chants)
    Thanked by 1CHGiffen
  • CCoozeCCooze
    Posts: 1,259
    The right edge of the last page seems to be chopped off, at least on my phone.
    "...miserere n
    " bis"
    Thanked by 1francis
  • francisfrancis
    Posts: 9,937
    CCooze

    fixed

    BTW... the crucifix in the Stella Caeli is from pictures taken during the pope's urbi et orbi... if you zoom in you can see the rain drops... looks like Jesus is sweating.