SEP organ/choral accompaniments
  • ryandryand
    Posts: 1,545
    UPDATE: Dec 31, 2011
    (original message included at bottom of post)

    There is an improved format from the 2nd Sunday of Christmas and beyond (I will edit the others when the year circles back around). The most notable difference is that there are no longer simple/complex, now they are organ/choral.
    I'm much happier with the results of these.

    The two versions are also entirely compatible! It would be possible to sing, for example:
    -Antiphon in unison
    -Antiphon in unison, with organ
    -Cantor on verse, organ accomp
    -Antiphon in unison, with organ
    -Cantor on verse, organ accomp
    -Antiphon CHORAL, with organ


    I have also added the mode at the upper left of each. The low/high keys should remain relatively consistent, so an antiphon in mode V in the low key will match any other.

    Also new:
    GLORY BE accompaniments are separate, and a little "fuller" than the other psalm/verse accompaniment.
    They'll be labelled according to mode and low/high key, so that you can pair them with the setting you are using for the day. If you are singing an Introit in mode V, low key, then the Glory Be under the same category will be compatible.

    I am including these week-to-week, as needed. Once all the modes are covered then I'll consolidate them into one file for each key.

    Pax,
    -Ryan

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    ORIGINAL POST
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    (Applies until Mary, Mother of God. New format starts at 2nd Christmas)


    Two versions, simple and complex, as well as two keys are provided. There are two measures at the end of each which will provide harmony for the verses, but you will need to reference the SEP page for the lyrics and tones.


    As I hope to preserve the integrity of Adam Bartlett's art in composing these, I ask that you take a moment to read these performance notes:

    The simple versions will probably work better with larger ensembles, or where cantor & organist are two different people. The complex ones are easily executed by a single cantor/organist, or with adequate rehearsal between different individuals. Attempting this presents a strong potential pitfall, and so I note the stylistic necessity of avoiding "metric" performance. Not every "quarter" note is equal! Always defer to the rhythm of the text. I have notated them with quarter/half notes only for the visual of the sustained tones. You will find that in the Gregorian notation of the originals, the half notes are either dotted or doubled. It might be helpful to practice with the Gregorian notation first, and only once that natural rhythm of the text is established in your ears, add the accompaniment. The point I wish to stress is that these are never intended to be performed metrically. Interpret the rhythm in light of the text.

    It was also mentioned in the first thread (I decided to start a cleaner one) that these might be used for a choir. I think that is a fine idea, keeping in mind all that has already been stated regarding interpretation. My only hesitation is that it may begin to sound like a "choral" piece, rather than the chanted style in which this collection was written to be sung. I can imagine it working quite well, I just urge great care in the interpretation of it. It might be effective to do the antiphon in unison the first time or two, and then introduce the choral harmony.

    The complex versions could be quite beautiful with unaccompanied choir, but even the simple could be effective. I'd suggest in either option that the sustained tones become repeated tones, so that all voices sing all syllables... even if it is that the cantor moves and the choir repeats a single chord, but while following the text.

    In all of these options, let us remember that unaccompanied, unison chant is the ideal. I (obviously) have no qualms with accompaniment or harmony, but we must always be mindful of these things as peripheral to the chant itself, and not let any of it distract.


    I hope that these prove useful to you, and to the widespread use of the Simple English Propers.
  • ryandryand
    Posts: 1,545
    Christmas: Vigil Mass
  • ryandryand
    Posts: 1,545
    (Vigil mass, higher key)
  • ryandryand
    Posts: 1,545
    Christmas: Midnight Mass
  • ryandryand
    Posts: 1,545
    (Midnight, higher key)
  • ryandryand
    Posts: 1,545
    Christmas: Mass at Dawn
  • ryandryand
    Posts: 1,545
    (Mass at Dawn, higher key)
  • ryandryand
    Posts: 1,545
    Christmas: Mass of the Day
  • ryandryand
    Posts: 1,545
    (Christmas, Mass of the Day, higher key)
  • francisfrancis
    Posts: 8,224
    These propers are great!

    I hope with the dawn of these propers, they will be restored to the Liturgy in the US as they should rightfully be.
  • ryandryand
    Posts: 1,545
    For anyone who tried these out, what was your experience with them? I did all propers for Vigil and Day, and have my own thoughts (edits), but I'm just as interested in yours!

    When we're back at this point next year, I am sure that I'll have changed some of these feldgling attempts, having better figured out what is effective. I find this to be different in actual liturgical "performance" than when practicing alone.
  • ryandryand
    Posts: 1,545
    .
  • ryandryand
    Posts: 1,545
    Holy Family
  • ryandryand
    Posts: 1,545
    Holy Family (higher key)
  • ryandryand
    Posts: 1,545
    On some of these you will see small parenthetical notes at the end of the antiphon. They are intended for the final time through. In the case of Communion B & C (Holy Family, above) this means that the note may be omitted the final time. In the case of all of the others for Holy Family, it is simply eliminating the inversion. Substitute those notes for the bass and/or tenor. Many of these end on inversions, and if the verses will follow, I find this acceptable. There is forward motion and a sense of "more." To end on these harmonies, though, can sometimes feel like you're stuck in liturgical limbo! While I sometimes enjoy the mystical anticipation nature in this, its not always appropriate or effective... or you may just simply not like it!

    Spark Notes: I've included options for the endings. You'll make wise and musical decisions, I know it!
  • Ben YankeBen Yanke
    Posts: 3,114
    Here's one tip: since each proper is separate, I would hide the key signature at the end of the psalm tones.
  • ryandryand
    Posts: 1,545
    Noted. Future postings will have this correction.

    Have you tried them at your parish?
  • Ben YankeBen Yanke
    Posts: 3,114
    Nope, I haven't used them at my parish, I'm a lowly teenager, not a highfalutin' MD like many here... :)

    However, I do occasionally sing for and plan Masses, and I very well may use them then.
  • ryandryand
    Posts: 1,545
    I'm no highfalutin' MD myself, just a lowly part timer. ;)

    (looking to the sky, sighing longfully) "...maybe someday..."


    Let me know how they work out if you get a chance to use them!
  • Ben YankeBen Yanke
    Posts: 3,114
    Will do!
  • ryandryand
    Posts: 1,545
    Mary, Mother of God
  • ryandryand
    Posts: 1,545
    Mary, Mother of God (higher key)
  • The organist used them for the Christmas Eve Vigil Mass. They were well-received.
  • How cool. I haven't used them yet as I just found them. BTW, what are you using to write your score - being able to just use note heads instead of stemmed ones?

    I have been looking to be able to do this, but so far I haven't been successful.

    Thanks for these and thanks in advance for your expertise.
  • ryandryand
    Posts: 1,545
    musings,
    I am using Sibelius. The notes have stems during input, but it is possible to change the noteheads. There are many varieties available, including these stemless ones, x's (for percussion), triangular, diamond, etc. (Unfortunately no neumes!)

    The shortcut for this is shift+option+(number) on Mac, and Shift+Alt+(number) on PC. Each number (above the keyboard) provides a different notehead. Stemless notes are 8.

    I don't know Finale well, but I am sure that they provide a similar option. If you are using Finale, I would suggest looking up how to change noteheads.
  • ryandryand
    Posts: 1,545
    This is an exciting development:
    I just got back onto my Mac, with Sibelius 6. I was using a PC with Sibelius 3 for all of these so far. Between the newer version and the superior (opinion) OS I'm on now, I'm already moving quicker through these and the formatting is getting a few little updates.

    I'm also re-vamping the simple/complex idea to become instead an option for organ (more along the simple versions I've posted) and all-out choral parts. They'll be compatible, the choral options will just have many more moving lines, so that you don't get an alto thinking she's singing One Note Samba.

    They should also come to you sooner as we move forward. The number of propers over the last 5 days has been overwhelming, especially with all the holiday obligations. I'm already done with some of the next Sunday (Jan 8) and hope to churn these out with a buffer of a week or more, so interested parties can prepare for the coming Sunday.

    I'm excited to present the new format soon!
  • A dear priest friend of mine emailed me the link to this after I told him that we were doing some of the English Propers. I also started incorporating the organ into our Masses for Christmas Eve. These will be perfect for adding to our liturgy since during the holidays I am the only musician there! I'm hoping to get some of my college students to jump on and help me with them when the semester starts! Hope to see some of you at the Winter Chant Intensive in Houston in about a week! Thanks for posting!
    Thanked by 1ryand
  • ryandryand
    Posts: 1,545
    Please see the update at the top of the first post for info on the new format.

    (Starts NOW!)
  • ryandryand
    Posts: 1,545
    Second Sunday of Christmas: Organ
  • ryandryand
    Posts: 1,545
    Second Sunday of Christmas: Choral
  • ryandryand
    Posts: 1,545
    Glory Be for the Introit: Mode VIII
  • ryandryand
    Posts: 1,545
    Glory Be for the Communion: Mode II
  • ryandryand
    Posts: 1,545
    The communion for 2nd Sunday of Christmas is, because of its range, set lower than what I'll normally use for mode II. This is noted in all of the parts. For the high key, you'll actually use the low key Glory Be, and for the low key... use this one!
  • ryandryand
    Posts: 1,545
    Glory Be for the Introit: Mode II
  • ryandryand
    Posts: 1,545
    Glory Be for Communion: Mode IV
  • ryan:

    Thanks very much for your work on this project. I can foresee an unintended use of this by folks who cannot easily read the square-note notation... Very helpful!
  • ryandryand
    Posts: 1,545
    I've been using the SEP since September, and its the reason I am close-to-comfortable with square notes these days. I think its the best starter course you can get!
  • ryandryand
    Posts: 1,545
    2nd Sunday of Ordinary Time: Organ

    (edit: added final parenthetical notes for Communion)
  • ryandryand
    Posts: 1,545
    2nd Sunday of Ordinary Time: Choral

    (edit: added final parenthetical notes for Communion)
  • ryandryand
    Posts: 1,545
    As we move into ordinary time, there are often different texts for years A/B/C. Where this is the case, the incipits will indicate as such.

    I am only able to post the current year (B) for the time being, but will be filling in the blanks as the collection nears completion next year.

    Please continue to share comments on your experience with using these. I'm very interested as to their effectiveness. I used the Epiphany settings this morning and was happier with them than anything else I've posted so far.

    How have these been working out for anyone else?
  • francisfrancis
    Posts: 8,224
    ryand

    these are a wonderful compliment to the SEP. Congrats. We will try them soon.
  • ryandryand
    Posts: 1,545
    Thanks francis! I look forward to your feedback after trying them out.
  • ryandryand
    Posts: 1,545
    Glory Be for the Introit: Mode IV
  • ryandryand
    Posts: 1,545
    Glory Be for the Communion: Mode VIII
  • ryandryand
    Posts: 1,545
    .
  • I was just hired as the Organist/Choir Master of a parish that has started doing the Simple English Chant for communion and your service has helped me and the choir out alot. Thank You for all the work that you do and May God continue to Bless and Grace you for all the time and effort you put into, putting these files together. Once again Thank You. Mr. J. Anthony Pietrowski.
  • AngelaR
    Posts: 259
    Hi Ryan,

    I am eagerly awaiting your next set. We are planning to rehearse with the organ tomorrow evening. Thanks so much for doing this! :)

    Angela
  • ryandryand
    Posts: 1,545
    Comment removed by author
  • AngelaR
    Posts: 259
    We will certainly be praying, Ryan! I know how frustrating that can be. I think you forgot to attach the file?