English Translation for this hymn?
  • Could I beseech your help in translating this for me into English?

    The earliest known hymn to the Sacred Heart, "Summi Regis Cor Aveto" is believed to have been written by the Norbertine, Blessed Herman Joseph (d.1241) of Cologne, Germany.


    Summi Regis Cor aveto
    Te Saluto corde laeto
    Te complecti me delectat
    Et cor meum hoc affectat
    Ut ad Te loquar toleres
  • And there are even more verses posted here: Norbertine Vocations

    Has anyone ever seen an English translation? Loosely translated is fine...
  • Here's a relevant Wikipedia article (see part VI). If you find a recording of the Buxtehude, it should have an English translation, though probably not poetic. Curious that the "first Lutheran Oratorio" should be in Latin.
  • Thank you, Richard. I had "hit" upon that a few times, but wasn't quite sure if it was the same. I found some things attributed to St. Bernard of Clairvaux instead of Hermann Joseph, so I had doubts. This is a great lead for me.
  • RagueneauRagueneau
    Posts: 2,592
    Hail Heart of the Highest King.
    I salute Thee with a happy heart;
    To embrace Thee delights me;
    This affects (touches) my heart,
    that You allow me to speak to Thee.


    Summi Regis Cor aveto
    Te Saluto corde laeto
    Te complecti me delectat
    Et cor meum hoc affectat
    Ut ad Te loquar toleres


    Translation by a kind Franciscan
  • JamJam
    Posts: 636
    my attempt:

    hail the Heart of the Highest King
    I salute You with a joyful heart
    to embrace You, it pleases me
    and this lays claim to my heart
    that I speak to You, You tolerate.

    Jeff's translation is good (definitely more poetic), but I have a few questions:

    1) the translation of "affectat" -- I got "affecto, affectare, affectavi, affectatus V (1st): aim at, desire, aspire, try, lay claim to; try to control; feign, pretend." So where does the "affects" or "touches" come from? Is it just a smoother rendering of the meaning into English?

    2) "loquar" is not an infinitive, but rather an active subjunctive (first person singular)--of a deponent verb. Or it could be the future indicative. ("I speak to you, in order that you might tolerate [it]?"). I agree that the infinitive is a better translation into English, but I am wondering how best to translate it literally. If both verbs are subjunctive, the best way I could put them in the ut clause is what I did above. Feels weird though.

    Or maybe it could be, "let me speak to you, that you might tolerate it" (although that doesn't follow naturally from the previous line)
  • Maureen
    Posts: 670
    Affectare's original meaning, which came from "afficere", was to do something to something. Classical Latin had the "try to do something" meaning, but that eventually went away almost entirely, and the meaning went back to doing something to something. Hence, "affect" and "affection". The only survivor of the "try" meaning, I think, is "affectation".

    Medieval/Church Latin and Classical Latin. Sorta like American English vs. English English.
  • Thank you so much. I really appreciate the input.
  • JamJam
    Posts: 636
    yeah, Maureen, thanks. I am in a Latin class right now that is teaching us both at the same time, and it feels kind of schizophrenic at times, haha.