Silent Canon in Ordinary Form
  • ghmus7
    Posts: 1,221
    Well I cannot see why singing by the congregation could not be encouraged in the EF. Isn't that really what the reforms were about?
    But I have never seen or participated in an EF where the congregation did any singing except sometimes with a hymn after the last gospel. That's what I meant, more that the forms of the rites influencing each other though the OF would benefit I'm,sure.
  • kevinfkevinf
    Posts: 1,111
    Go to St. Nicholas du Chardonnet in Paris. People sing the Ordinary, the Alleluia and some Latin hymns. Yes, its an EF liturgy.
    Thanked by 1madorganist
  • Protasius
    Posts: 468
    At every high mass I have attended where a chant ordinary was sung, the people sang their part of the ordinary and the responses. And the vast majority of these masses are EF liturgies.
  • a_f_hawkins
    Posts: 1,983
    We have a disconnect between the experience of ghmus7 - "I have never seen or participated in an EF where the congregation did any singing" and the consistent teaching of the popes from 1903 to 1955 summarised in De musica sacra, Sep 1958. See AAS-50-1958 available in English from CCWatershed. Note the first paragraph of the introduction, and #24-27.
    In this manner a most desireable result will be accomplished, for Christians in every part of the world will be able to express their common Faith by active participation in the most holy Sacrifice of the Mass with a common joyful chant.
    Hac sane via illud maxime optabile obtineri potest, ut Christifideles, ubicumque terrarum, communem Fidem in actuosa participatione sacrosancto Missae Sacrificio, communi quoque laetoque concentu manifestare valeant.
    Thanked by 1hilluminar
  • tomjaw
    Posts: 1,839
    We have a disconnect between the experience of ghmus7 - "I have never seen or participated in an EF where the congregation did any singing" and the consistent teaching of the popes from 1903 to 1955 summarised ...


    Yes we all know some, and this is only a few places that have a low Mass culture. I will also point out that here in the U.K. many masses are without music because they take place during the week, when many are working. While we could sing our 7am low Mass most days if I got my children up to serve, although those that have to get to work may not be too happy with a Mass that will be 30mins longer. It is easier for us to have a later Mass on Feast days that can be sung (10am, 12.30 or 7pm in the evening)

    As for the "consistent teaching of the popes".. teaching is all very well but what about leading by example... As for the tinkering with the Liturgy between 1903 and 1957, how does a period of regular change aid in participation? Stability is what is required, once the music becomes familiar then we can move forward.
  • a_f_hawkins
    Posts: 1,983
    If no one sings that is one thing (Low Mass). But if there is singing then the congregation should participate. Not monopolise, participate. This has been a stable feature of the directives on the Mass for the whole of my 80 years, that is how it was at my school Masses, that is what popes have commended, instructed, requested, implored for all the last century.
    Thanked by 1hilluminar
  • dad29
    Posts: 1,902
    Well, we could always use Fr. Martin SJ's approach: if the laity doesn't obey, the teaching is not received, ergo the teaching is invalid.

    There. All fixed!!
  • Dad,

    You forgot the other convenient part, if it's a teaching Fr. Martin wants others to accept. "It's the prophetic voice in the Church today."