Hymn to St. Anne
  • Can anyone help with hymns to St. Anne? My pastor/ boss has asked me to look around, as she is our patron. I would rather avoid the Lourdes tune with St. Anne text in favor of finding something less common yet still fairly accessible. Thanks!
  • email address...I'll send you two.

    noel
    www.thecatholichymnal.com
  • Mille grazie!
    maryann at maryanncarr dot com
  • O Good Saint Anne, we call on your name,
    Thy praises loud, thy pilgrims proclaim!
    To all who invoke thee, now lend us an ear,
    Thou soothest the sorrows of all who draw near.
    The weary, despondent, or sorrowful, here,
    Find help in their sadness, a balm for each tear.
    The sick, the afflicted, the lame and the blind,
    The suffering, the erring, all solace here find.

    -- Hymn to Saint Anne

    Is there a tune for this text?
  • Maureen
    Posts: 651
    Oh, Caswall has a gorgeous one! Check it out!
    http://books.google.com/books?id=MmkNAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA327&dq=hymn+%22St.+Anne%22

    Apparently it's meant to be sung to the same tune as "O gloriosa domina", and is basically a serious parody/adjustment of that hymn to the Virgin Mary. Which isn't the worst strategy, really. Here's the Latin and English involved:
    http://www.preces-latinae.org/thesaurus/BVM/OGloriosa.html
    And that chant's on YouTube:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ziSOwnI0hMc

    Faber has a sentimental little ballad/hymn:
    http://books.google.com/books?id=UaQ-AAAAIAAJ&pg=RA1-PA207&dq=hymn+%22St.+Anne%22

    Here's another hymn from another hymnbook! What a popular saint!
    http://books.google.com/books?id=3SUDAAAAQAAJ&pg=RA2-PT105&dq=hymn+%22St.+Anne%22&lr=

    There's an Anglican tune "St. Anne", but that's apparently named after the Anglican parish where the composer worked as an organist.

    I suspect there's tons more to be found on her, even just on archive.org or books.google.com. Unlike (snif) our parish's glorious but neglected patron St. Albert....
  • HYMN TO ST ALBERT

    Friend of God, we choose you our patron;
    Grant us these favours we place in you care.
    May we be worthy of our sacred calling;
    Always have love of our Faith and of prayer.
    Give us your wisdom to know in our mind
    How to be pure, honest, humble and kind.
    Guide us, St. Albert, to our only home,
    Where God will be with us and love us His own.


    Listen now to your young apostles,
    Singing this prayer of petition to you.
    Proudly we promise our love and respect for
    God and His church, ever sacred and true.
    Patron of science and seeker for knowledge,
    Help us and guide us to come to God's grace.
    Ask Him, we pray you, to give us the strength
    To follow your lead 'till we gaze on His face.
  • Maureen
    Posts: 651
    Frogman --
    Ooh, you're good. Quick, too. :)

    Re: St. Anne --

    St. Anne apparently had something like 25 hymns and sequences, back in the Middle Ages. Dang, it's really nice to be popular!

    http://books.google.com/books?id=2h8bAAAAYAAJ&printsec=frontcover&dq=Lateinische+hymnen+mittelalter&lr=#PRA1-PA184,M1
    Her hymns start on page 184 of this volume, down at the bottom. I know this isn't really helpful for your needs, but it's pretty cool to know!
  • I'm not always sure what my needs are, but I like this and downloaded it! Thanks.
  • Maureen
    Posts: 651
    I should go to bed... but those old medieval sequences are really cool. We should grab them back as hymns or motets, if nothing else.

    Here's a quick, slightly munged version of one:

    "Salve parens matris Christi"
    A sequence for St. Anne's Day
    (p. 185-186 in Lateinische Hymnen des Mittelalters, Vol. III)

    Translated by Maureen O'Brien, 6/12/09


    Christ's mother's mother, hail! You are
    The first on earth who knew that star
    From whence broke forth our Sun!

    Through you, Light from Light arose
    From that gate to all men closed,
    Foretold by prophets once.

    Happy would that birthing be
    By which God swore eternally
    To shatter Death for good.

    Author of such good that day,
    St. Anne, drive cruel words away
    As God's laws say we should.

    You were barren once, so tongues
    Teased you. When no longer young,
    Your neighbors scorned your quest.

    Fin'lly fruitful with a child,
    You who once had been reviled --
    Then they proclaimed you blest.

    Your girl's Child wills that our prayers
    With you and your child be shared.
    So we trust them to you --

    Whom God trusted to prove true,
    Whom God grants to know and do
    The great good given you.

    END.
  • Kathy
    Posts: 5,005
    I'll bet the Summit Choirbook has some spiffy hymns to St. Albert.
  • Maureen
    Posts: 651
    Yes, the Dominicans have some incentive. :) There's a nice chant for his day here, but no hymns, alas.
    http://www.domcentral.org/life/albertus.htm

    The funny thing is that, before he got raised to the altars, searching for St. Albert would have gotten you St. Adalbert instead. :)

    But it's not surprising, really, that a relatively new saint doesn't have much going. Since hymns for saints haven't been a priority for most people anyway, and since not everybody who says the Liturgy of the Hours wants to add special, non-generic stuff for saints' feastdays. But I still think that, even if every parish doesn't have hymns for every saint in every calendar, it really ought to be something that concerns every parish about their patron saint. And if little itty-bitty parishes in South America have all their special hymns and songs for their patron saint and his festival up on their little itty-bitty webpage, it just makes us look very cheap around here. It seems a bit negligent and ungrateful.

    (We don't have a church festival in our parish. Our patron's feast falls at the beginning of winter and during our music director's vacation week, so it's rather a quiet affair except for the schoolkids. They apparently do have a song to St. Albert - possibly that one posted above - but I have not been able to ascertain what it is. We do have a parish picnic in the summer, but it is pretty much just that.)

    In other news, I think I mistranslated one of the verses of that St. Anne sequence. I think now it's supposed to be about bringing blessings out of curses and darkly suspect a specific scriptural reference, but the concordances didn't help me this morning.
  • Chrism
    Posts: 663
    frogman: Is there a tune for this text?

    Hmmm...there might be a proper tune. If the proper tune isn't known, it would make sense to try to fit something.

    The exact meter is 45 45 65 65 65 65 65 65, or 99 11 11 11 11 11 11. (Is there a better way to write that?)

    If you stretch the first two verses a bit (holding GOOD, ANNE, PRAISEs and LOUD, for example), you could get 65 65 D (x2), or 11 11 11 11 D, which works with Away in a Manger (either tune, but I'm partial to the one that starts do-fa), How Firm a Foundation, and even Adoro Te Devote (though that has a Trochaic meter which doesn't fit this text well).

    There are other tunes out there...scroll down for the metrical index at CCEL or search the Oremus hymnal for Meter: 11 and Meter: 65, or look in the back of your favorite hymnal. Happy hunting. If you end up typesetting something, please consider sharing it!
  • Maureen
    Posts: 651
    I decided to go scrounge pages in Spanish. Once I figure out the right search terms, something other than samba groups celebrating St. Albert's feastday will probably show up.... But I did find an unofficial, non-liturgical cheer (!) from the chemistry students of the world. I'm sure this reminds St. Albert of the old university days in Paris. :)

    UPDATE: But it's been suggested to me that some of the words are a bit racy in Spanish for a sacred music board, so I'll edit this entry just to point to the place I found it. Sorry about that!

    http://boards4.melodysoft.com/app?ID=joscov&msg=903&DOC=81

    Oh, and Pes wasn't originally saying thanks for me editing out the chemist student cheer.... :)
  • Pes
    Posts: 623
    Thanks, Maureen!

    BTW, the basso profundo in Savall's "O Gloriosa Domina" is amazing.
  • RagueneauRagueneau
    Posts: 2,592
    Hugle, in the Caecilia editions Jeffrey recently posted, set the tune:

    O Good Saint Anne, we call on your name,
    Thy praises loud, thy pilgrims proclaim!
    To all who invoke thee, now lend us an ear,
    Thou soothest the sorrows of all who draw near.
    The weary, despondent, or sorrowful, here,
    Find help in their sadness, a balm for each tear.
    The sick, the afflicted, the lame and the blind,
    The suffering, the erring, all solace here find.

    I think his setting is similar to IMMACULATE MARY tune
  • Kathy
    Posts: 5,005
    Here's the first bit of a translation of Nocti succedit lucifer, an office hymn for the day, in Long Meter, with thanks be to the Singing Mum for a totally fun Colloquium.

    The morning star is on the rise
    And soon the dawn will fill the skies,
    Foretelling of the coming Sun
    Whose light will shine on everyone.

    The Sun of justice, Christ, true Light,
    And Mary, grace's dawning bright,
    And Anna, reddening the sky,
    Have caused the night of Law to fly.

    O mother Anna, fruitful root,
    From you came your salvation's shoot,
    For you brought forth the flow'ring rod
    That bore for us the Christ of God.

    (a couple more verses to come)

    trans. c. 2009 Kathleen Pluth. This text may be used freely on July 25-26, 2009. All other rights reserved.
  • G
    Posts: 1,387
    kathy, there isn't a pork chops's chance at a barbeque that I could sing or have anyone else sing that at an actual liturgical event at my parish, but would you mind if it found its way into the bulletin?

    There is a small but strong devotion to St Anne in the area, centered around praying for her intercession for the lives of those unborn.

    I would, of course, have no chance of monitoring what happened to it after that.

    (Save the Liturgy, Save the World)
  • Kathy
    Posts: 5,005
    YES!!!

    I had not heard of that devotion to St. Anne. What a lovely intercessor!
  • St Anne is mentioned in passing in the Christmass carol, The Snow Lay on the Ground ('Venite Adoremus') which can be found at no. 41 in The Hymnal 1940 This appears in the second stanza: 'Twas Mary, daughter pure, of holy Anne...'. Once, many years ago when I did this at a Lutheran church the pastor had me edit her out because she wasn't in the Bible.
  • Chrism
    Posts: 663
    Hymns with music:

    Spotless Anna! Juda's glory - Westminster #210 (p. 290) - Fr. Caswall's translation of Clarae dici gaudiis
    To Kneel at Thine Altar - St. Basil's (1918) #133 - The Lourdes tune you wanted to avoid
    O Lady High in Glory Raised - St. Basil's (1918) #134
    Coeli regem attollamus - Franciscan - Cantus varii (1902) - p. 142, ep. 185
    Foecunda radix Isai - French Benedictine - Cantus varii (1902) - ep. 486
    Lucis beatae gaudiis - French Benedictine - Cantus varii (1902) - ep. 488
    Gaude Mater Anna - Cantus selecti #173 (p. 213)
    Stirps Jesse - Cantus selecti #102 (p. 120) - originally for BVM but recommended by the Solesmes monks for St. Anne's feast

    Westminster, St. Basil's and Cantus varii are online.
  • Kathy, thanks a million! The fun was mine, only 51 weeks to go till next year.

    I would Love to use your translation next week. We have a hymn picked out (Spotless Anna! text with 'There's a wideness in God's mercy' tune) but I don't see how Father could resist a hymn from the office. Will let you know.

    Back to the drawing board in search of an irresistible long meter tune, suitable for an entrance procession.

    CHRISM, Thanks for all the suggestions! It is especially great to know about the online resources.


    Gee, it would seem lots of folks love St. Anne. I must admit I'm feeling honored to have the name (MA stands for Mary Ann).
  • Kathy
    Posts: 5,005
    Glad you like it! But don't worry if you can't use it just now. It's very helpful to me to have an "assignment"--helps to focus me on a task, as it were.

    My go-to LM tunes are the sturdy EISENACH and the chanty JESU DULCIS MEMORIA, btw.
  • Kathy
    Posts: 5,005
    Mary Ann and G,

    This is a complete version of that hymn I was translating.

    By way of "fun factor" notice that the imagery of verse 1 is repeated in verse 2, only backwards. This kind of parallelistic structure, called chiasm--because the structure is shaped like the Greek letter CHI, i.e. X--is also present throughout the Psalms.

    Nothing is holier than this cosmic mystery of the Incarnation. Therefore we shall celebrate the event with a little word game. This attitude, which I take to be a playful kind of deep and rather monkish reverence, is an important feature of our sacred music heritage.

    Cheers!

    The morning star is on the rise
    And soon the dawn will fill the skies,
    Foretelling of the coming Sun
    Whose light will shine on everyone.

    The Sun of justice, Christ, true Light,
    And Mary, grace's dawning bright,
    And Anna, reddening the sky,
    Have caused the night of Law to fly.

    O mother Anna, fruitful root,
    From you came your salvation's shoot,
    For you brought forth the flow'ring rod
    That bore for us the Christ of God.

    Christ's mother's mother, by the grace
    Your daughter's birth brought to our race,
    And by her merits and her prayer
    May we her favors come to share.

    O Jesus, Virgin-born, to You
    All glory is forever due.
    To Father and the Spirit, praise
    Be sung through everlasting days.

    trans. c. 2009 Kathleen Pluth. This text may be used freely on July 25-26, 2009. All other rights reserved.

    This is the original:

    Nocti succedit lucifer,
    Quem mox aurora sequitur,
    Solis ortum praenuntians
    Mundum lustrantis lumine

    Christus sol est iustitiae,
    Aurora Mater gratiae,
    Quam, Anna, praeis rutilans
    Legis propellens tenebras

    Anna, radix uberrima,
    Arbor tu salutifera
    Virgam producens floridam
    Quae Christum nobis attulit

    O matris Christi genetrix
    Tuque parens sanctissime
    Natae favente merito
    Nobis rogate veniam.

    Iesu, tibi sit gloria,
    Qui natus est de Virgine,
    Cum patre et almo Spiritu,
    In sempiterna saecula
    Thanked by 1CHGiffen
  • Kathy
    Posts: 5,005
    Mary Ann and G,

    This is a complete version of that hymn I was translating.

    By way of "fun factor" notice that the imagery of verse 1 is repeated in verse 2, only backwards. This kind of parallelistic structure, called chiasm--because the structure is shaped like the Greek letter CHI, i.e. X--is also present throughout the Psalms.

    Nothing is holier than this cosmic mystery of the Incarnation. Therefore we shall celebrate the event with a little word game. This attitude, which I take to be a playful kind of deep and rather monkish reverence, is an important feature of our sacred music heritage.

    Cheers!

    The morning star is on the rise
    And soon the dawn will fill the skies,
    Foretelling of the coming Sun
    Whose light will shine on everyone.

    The Sun of justice, Christ, true Light,
    And Mary, grace's dawning bright,
    And Anna, reddening the sky,
    Have caused the night of Law to fly.

    O mother Anna, fruitful root,
    From you came your salvation's shoot,
    For you brought forth the flow'ring rod
    That bore for us the Christ of God.

    Christ's mother's mother, by the grace
    Your daughter's birth brought to our race,
    And by her merits and her prayer
    May we her favors come to share.

    O Jesus, Virgin-born, to You
    All glory is forever due.
    To Father and the Spirit, praise
    Be sung through everlasting days.

    trans. c. 2009 Kathleen Pluth. This text may be used freely on July 25-26, 2009. All other rights reserved.

    This is the original:

    Nocti succedit lucifer,
    Quem mox aurora sequitur,
    Solis ortum praenuntians
    Mundum lustrantis lumine

    Christus sol est iustitiae,
    Aurora Mater gratiae,
    Quam, Anna, praeis rutilans
    Legis propellens tenebras

    Anna, radix uberrima,
    Arbor tu salutifera
    Virgam producens floridam
    Quae Christum nobis attulit

    O matris Christi genetrix
    Tuque parens sanctissime
    Natae favente merito
    Nobis rogate veniam.

    Iesu, tibi sit gloria,
    Qui natus est de Virgine,
    Cum patre et almo Spiritu,
    In sempiterna saecula
    Thanked by 1CHGiffen
  • Kathy
    Posts: 5,005
    (Bumping)

    That time of year again...
  • Yes, and we are planning to use it again, with your permission, on July 25. Thanks again for this, Kathy! Methinks a token of appreciation- at the least- is in order.
    Maybe from Solesmes, where I will be in 2 hours. :)

    Please confirm that we do indeed have your permission. I should have thought of that weeks ago, my bad.

    And just so everyone knows, this hymn went over very well last year. We used the more common tune to 'faith if our fathers'.
  • Kathy
    Posts: 5,005
    Feel free, MA. Have great trip!
  • Liam
    Posts: 3,752
    Btw, there is nothing preventing you from changing Anne to Anna for the sake of meter.
  • Kathy
    Posts: 5,005
    Do you mean, changing Anna to Anne?
  • Liam
    Posts: 3,752
    Either way. I was thinking of the earlier examples that used Anne instead of Anna. Anna has the felicity of resonance with the story of Hannah....
  • Kathy
    Posts: 5,005
    (bumping for tomorrow's feast)
  • CHGiffenCHGiffen
    Posts: 4,112
    Kathy, thanks for posting your translation of Nocti succedit lucifer at the Chant Cafe! I rooted around the internet and the Global Chant Database for awhile, looking for the Gregorian melody for this hymn, and could not find anything other than an incipit for the first line from (liberhymnarius.org):

    ed g aC Cb ag a ab b

    This is somewhat similar to the Hildegard von Bingen Jesu Corona Virginum (this links to an mp3, I don't have the source). And also to a version of Cor arca legem continens (also don't have the source). But in both cases the melody diverges after about 6 syllables.

    Does anyone have the chant source for this hymn? I'd be very interested to have the full music.
  • tomjaw
    Posts: 1,473
    A quick look finds a Hymn "Succedit nocti lucifer" In the Antiphonale Monasticum, for the 26th July. The rest of the text is almost the same as above, verse 4 is omitted and it has a different doxology.
    I was mid way through re-typsetting it see pdf below, alternative text is also marked in brackets.
    image
    Thanked by 1CHGiffen
  • CHGiffenCHGiffen
    Posts: 4,112
    @ tomjaw - Many thanks!

    I found that text variant somewhere, and also the corresponding Mode II incipit (I didn't have the Antiphonae Monasticum available for the whole chant). Obvioiusly, the two melodies must be quite different, since the incipit I gave above is surely not Mode II. Of the textual variations, I wonder which represents the older form? Ditto for the two melodic forms?

    Chuck
  • tomjaw
    Posts: 1,473
    I have had another look around for some more information, but there does not seem to be much...
    I note that the other Hymns to Saint Anne are also shortened in the AM, and in my experience it is more likely for verses to be omitted over time. We would have to look where the above text (in Kathy's post) came from, Also the Liber Antiphonarius (1891) has different hymns to St. Anne, why did they change them?
    Lateinische hymnen mittelalter has one variant of the text, I will have to look up where I found the other variant.

    As for the melody, I have two versions of the Mode II... (Monastic) there are other variations, Dominican etc.
    I can't find the other melody and the Liber Hymnarius does not give a reference, and the Global Chant database only has the Mode II. (The Global chant database is far from a complete reference.)
    Will have some time tonight to finish typesetting the the Succedit.

    I note the Sarum office has different Hymns for St. Anne.

    Thanked by 1CHGiffen
  • Jazzer
    Posts: 34
    Bumping St Anne...

    This year on a Sunday!

    17th Sunday of OT with some St Anne/Marian content?
  • ZacPB189ZacPB189
    Posts: 70
    O Good Saint Anne, we call on your name,
    Thy praises loud, thy pilgrims proclaim!
    To all who invoke thee, now lend us an ear,
    Thou soothest the sorrows of all who draw near.
    The weary, despondent, or sorrowful, here,
    Find help in their sadness, a balm for each tear.
    The sick, the afflicted, the lame and the blind,
    The suffering, the erring, all solace here find.

    -- Hymn to Saint Anne


    Shouldn't the "your" in the first line be "thy"?
  • Richard MixRichard Mix
    Posts: 1,836
    I wonder if there's something coming up in Palo Alto!

    In light of what I've read about St Anne being the great summer holiday in 18-19c Vienna, it seems odd to me that there is a such a paucity of Vesper settings by the classical composers with the female cursus of Psalms. Maybe no one was expected to be back from picnicking in time.
  • CHGiffenCHGiffen
    Posts: 4,112
    For settings of Kathy's "The Morning Star is on the Rise" (Nocti succedit lucifer), also see:

    http://forum.musicasacra.com/forum/discussion/7150/hymn-to-st.-anne-the-morning-star-is-on-the-risenocti-succedit-lucifer/p1
    Thanked by 1Kathy
  • expeditus1
    Posts: 480
    I'm in the process of finishing up a booklet for the Feast of St. Anne, but am missing a translation for the following medieval sequence. Is there a Latin translation whiz out there that could help?

    JOACHIM EST NATA
    Joachim est nata filia benedicta. Ex Anna est orta splendida maris stella. Prophetarum ad implens praeconia: Mundo parans salutis remedia. O Joachim felix! O felix Anna! Draconis cervix est conculcata. Virgo dum prodit immaculata. Stella matutina, Rosa sine spina. O Joachim felix! O felix Anna! Germinat virgula Jesse post saecula. Mire fructifera, Promissa munera. Christi Matris parentum laus fulget inclyta. Fulgent gratiae dona et vitae merita. O Joachim felix! O felix Anna! Et nos, cum prole praecelsa. Juvent Joachim et Anna: Nos perducant ad superna, Sacra prece, Christi regna: Ubi regnat cum Filio, Joachim et Annae filia. Alleluia.

  • CHGiffenCHGiffen
    Posts: 4,112
    It appears in translation at No. 335 in the Summit Choirbook. See this post in another thread.
  • expeditus1
    Posts: 480
    Thanks, Chuck. It does appear to be an abbreviated poetic translation? There are some additional Latin verses that still need translation - literal, if possible.
  • expeditus1
    Posts: 480
    OK, I took a stab at a literal translation of Joachim est Nata, myself. Is there someone with a critical eye for Latin, that can correct/improve this?

    Of Joachim is born the daughter blessed.
    Of Anna has arisen the splendid star of the sea.
    Fulfilling the predictions of the prophets,
    Forming the remedy of the world's salvation.
    O Joachim fruitful! O fruit-bearing Anna!
    The dragon's neck is trampled,
    When the immaculate Virgin is produced.
    Morning star, a rose without thorns.
    O Joachim fruitful! O fruit-bearing Anna!
    Now blossoms the rod of Jesse, after ages.
    Abundantly fruitful, promised gift.
    The parents of the Mother of Christ praise her refulgent beauty,
    Shining with the merits of the gifts of grace and of life,
    O Joachim fruitful! O fruit-bearing Anna!
    And we, too, together with the exalted.
    Assist us, Joachim and Anna, that we may be led to heavenly things, sacred prayer, and the kingdom of Christ, where the saints reign with the Son, and the daughter of Joachim and Anna. Alleluia.

  •  
  • expeditus1
    Posts: 480
    Thanks, Mike, for the tip.

    Here is another attempt at translating, after receiving a critique of my original translation of "Joachim est Nata" above, from someone who is from the secular side. If anyone can still improve upon this, I would be most grateful.

    JOACHIM EST NATA
    Joachim est nata filia benedicta. Ex Anna est orta splendida maris stella. Prophetarum ad implens praeconia: Mundo parans salutis remedia. O Joachim felix! O felix Anna! Draconis cervix est conculcata. Virgo dum prodit immaculata. Stella matutina, Rosa sine spina. O Joachim felix! O felix Anna! Germinat virgula Jesse post saecula. Mire fructifera, Promissa munera. Christi Matris parentum laus fulget inclyta. Fulgent gratiae dona et vitae merita. O Joachim felix! O felix Anna! Et nos, cum prole praecelsa. Juvent Joachim et Anna: Nos perducant ad superna, Sacra prece, Christi regna: Ubi regnat cum Filio, Joachim et Annae filia. Alleluia.

    Of Joachim, is born the daughter blessed.
    Of Anne, has arisen the splendid star of the sea.
    Fulfilling the predictions of the prophets,
    Providing the remedy of salvation for the world.
    O Joachim fruitful! O fruit-bearing Anne!
    The dragon's neck is trampled,
    When the immaculate Virgin is produced.
    Morning star, a rose without thorns.
    O Joachim fruitful! O fruit-bearing Anne!
    After ages, the rod of Jesse,
    abundantly fruitful, brings forth the promised gift.
    The illustrious glory of the parents of the Mother of Christ shines.
    The gifts of grace and the merits of their lives shine.
    O Joachim fruitful! O fruit-bearing Anne!
    May Joachim and Anne aid us, together with their exalted offspring,
    and lead us, through sacred prayer, to the supernal dominion of Christ,
    where with the Son, reigns the daughter of Joachim and Anne. Alleluia.
  • expeditus1
    Posts: 480
    1511, you can find a sampling of a recording of "Joachim est Nata" on track #32 at the following link. I had found a complete recording online last week, but unfortunately I didn't save it, and have been unable to find it again.
    http://www.muziekweb.nl/Link/DJX0794
  • frpaul82
    Posts: 1
    I know I am VERY late to this discussion. I work at the Shrine of Sainte-Anne in Ste-Anne-de-Beaupré, Canada. There is a book of hymns to Ste Anne for sale here at the church store. Some of the verses are specific to the SHrine, but they can omitted or substituted. The website is ssadb.qc.ca Hit the link for the church store and have at it, as the saying goes.