Does anyone know how to make an accent on æ ? AE ae aé AÉ
  • RagueneauRagueneau
    Posts: 2,592
    Hello.

    Using a NORMAL program with NORMAL fonts, is it possible to make an accent on æ ?
  • Could not figure it out right off. But you could fake it by accenting the é and selecting the a and the é together. Then go to the font properties and adjust the kerning for just those two letters until they are touching. It's pretty close to what you want once you get it. It's a pain, but if you need something in the interim, it should work. You could then just copy and paste it wherever you needed it. I don't know what that will translate out to to other computers if it is electronic. Just an idea.

    -Albert
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  • Most well made and reasonably complete fonts should support it, including most of the common fonts. No special application is required, as long as it supports Unicode characters (like Word, Pages, and most other word processing apps these days).

    Here's the character: ǽ (In the Unicode table it is hexadecimal 01FD). You should be able to copy and paste it into your word processor. You can also see alternate ways of entering it here: http://www.fileformat.info/info/unicode/char/01fd/index.htm.

    Unfortunately, the Unicode specification doesn't include an œ with an acute accent, so that's a different story entirely! :P
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  • BTW, here's the uppercase variant: Ǽ (Unicode 01FD)
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  • I found this interesting link about creating your own, if you like:

    http://vlaurie.com/computers2/Articles/privchar.htm

    I was tinkering with it, and found it fairly simple to modify an ae with an accent by just dragging others in. I believe you can then save it to a fontset and give it a hexadecimal code.

    I sound so much smarter about this than I really am. Or dumber. I really can't tell.
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  • joerg
    Posts: 75
    It's customary to omit accents on upper case letters and ligatures.
    They look ugly and they aren't necessary anyway.
    The rules of latin prosody imply that if an æ occurs in the
    2nd last syllable of a word, then this syllable gets the accent.
    If a word doesn't have any written accents and the 3rd last syllable has an
    æ, then the 3rd last syllable gets the accent. So e.g.
    desævio has the accent on the 3rd last syllable while desævis has it
    on the 2nd last syllable.
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  • Why use the ligature <æ>in any case? It is not authentically Latin of the classical and patristic period, but was introduced in medieval times, because the pronunciation of had become equivalent to that of , which is what occurse in many manuscripts. I must say that I find it unfortunate that the Vatican Missale Romanum Editito typica tertia (2002) still uses it. Even more so the digraph <œ> for .
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  • Tom, there might be important criteria other than "authenticity", and further, authenticity is always in relation to something else. For example, one might be interested in reproducing 19th c. typography.
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  • Arthur,
    I can quite understand that for some there is a genuine attraction in digraphs/ligatures, and these were certainly favoured in the 19th century. I personally feel that they are a distraction from the text - just as Gothic lettering gives a spurious 'religious' flavour to texts and notices. Of course, on 'authenticity', I could be mischievous and say 'Liturgiam Authenticam'!
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  • CHGiffenCHGiffen
    Posts: 4,147
    While you're at it, resolve the "caeli/coeli" disconnect - please!!! I'm so tired of dealing with "Regina Coeli" versus "Regina Caeli" in scores received at CPDL - with or without the ligatures!
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  • RagueneauRagueneau
    Posts: 2,592
    Tom Dawkes,

    Would you agree that "meæ" is easier to read than "meae"?
  • CHGiffenCHGiffen
    Posts: 4,147
    It's no worse than "queue" or "queueing theory" - and that's English!
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  • For me it is not stylistic preference that dictates the use of the ash (æ), but 1) accurately reproducing chant texts from different periods of time, and 2) like JMO I find æ to more easily be automatically sung as a single syllable. Probably if I was fluent in speaking Latin then it wouldn't matter ("queue" is fine since I'm a native English speaker), but since I'm not, it helps a bit in chant execution.

    Also, regarding accents on capital letters: I think that to say they look ugly is entirely subjective. Modern Spanish rules require appropriate accents over uppercase letters, unless the letters form an acronym (http://buscon.rae.es/dpdI/SrvltGUIBusDPD?lema=tilde2, #7). I wouldn't be surprised if accents over uppercases were omitted because of difficulties in typesetting and type foundries, but modern typography has come a long way in typography and improving readability of type, which is why some outdated customs in type are left behind. (E.g., for many who learned to type on a typewriter, they were taught to put two spaces after a period because it helps legibility on non-proportional type. But in modern word processing this style is almost universally reviled now since it adds extra space without improving legibility. Unless you're using Courier or Consolas as a body text, but... :) )
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