• francisfrancis
    Posts: 8,300
    In the struggle I (we) have to maintain a truly "Catholic" identity in our own church, and to understand the tension that is now occuring between the pre and post conciliar ranks (both theological and musical/liturgical), I am always preening my spiritual feathers to find the best nest in which to roost. (I just threw out 3,000 books from my library and don't need to keep buying more, but this one looks like one of the best yet) Has anyone read this book? If so, what do you think! I am wondering if I should drop the fifty bucks and buy it.
  • GavinGavin
    Posts: 2,799
    I saw the topic and your name and figured it was another wonderful polyphonic work :P
  • francisfrancis
    Posts: 8,300
    O that is too funny! I like it!

    Not One Dot!

    (scored for NewChurch SATB Singers and electric guitar)
  • francisfrancis
    Posts: 8,300
    OK... no one read this book (I guess). Well, here is the dirt on the liturgy as printed in a review over on AD2000.com. The book is on its way to me from another state, and I will give you my impression once I have devoured it in between composing and building websites and designing store signs.

    "The chapters on liturgy brilliantly identify errors and misconceptions: "The principle of creativity stems from the false presupposition that the liturgy ought to express the feelings of the faithful, and that it is something that they themselves produce. What it really expresses is the mystery of Christ, Christ being the true source of the liturgy. The new view implicitly reduces the liturgy to the level of poetry" (p. 632). And: "The policy of creativity, which is intended to make the liturgy 'more lively and participatory' produces two effects. Firstly, it changes a sacred action into a theatrical display. Secondly, it changes the celebrant's activity into something private, or idiosyncratic, when in fact it always has a public and social character, even when it takes place in private" (p. 633)."
  • Jeffrey TuckerJeffrey Tucker
    Posts: 3,624
    Well, I have it and read it. It's my understanding that the author has recently been rehabilitated after having been treated like a schismatic for years.

    My memory of it is that it is informative, but I'm not, these days, very interested in slogging through through all the errors of the past. Just a temperament issue I guess.
  • francisfrancis
    Posts: 8,300
    OK...

    I am 250 pages into this book so far. It is quite a work, I must admit, and commands a slow and plotted read. Not for a weak-minded Catholic, as it tells all in a "very matter-of-fact" presentation. I find myself reading some of the chapters two or three times to fully ingest the content.