Altar cards for EF
  • CatherineS
    Posts: 226
    I hope this is not too far afield, though it's a bit tangential to music. I have two sets of altar cards I've ordered for priests, and noticed they are not identical in content. One is from Angelus Press (SSPX, no?), the other from Fraternity Publications (FSSP). My friend's elderly parish priest, when shown the new ones, pointed to his antique ones as his preferred version - I await a photo to see exactly what they contain. Do those of you affiliated with the TLM know if there are 'standard' versions, or if this is really something only standardized when mass manufactured (surely it has been common to produce them by hand, such as in convents, at least until the 20th century?).

    Can any of you with appropriate access to your own sacristies snap photos of the ones in use, especially if they are antique, so I can see what is being used in other places? I'll google around, too, but I prefer info from reliable sources and with a context, rather than just browsing Pinterest. :D

    It's the text I'm interested in more than the artwork.
  • tomjaw
    Posts: 1,530
    Google image search,

    https://sanctamissa.org/en/sacristy/sacristy-sanctuary-and-altar/altar-cards.html

    The text in this link can be read easily,
    http://unavoce.org/resources/printable-altar-cards-for-the-1962-missal/

    The text should be the same for all these cards, but the arrangement of the text is variable. I am told that some arrangements are better than others.
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  • CatherineS
    Posts: 226
    So here's exactly an example, then, and there is obviously some variation in both content and arrangement. I imagine a priest would get used to one arrangement or another, or prefer more or less detail. Any further comments, variations anyone has seen?

    So leaving aside the Last Gospel, which is on a card by itself, you have the larger card in the middle and the smaller one to the right.

    So to compare, first the large central card:

    Una Voce set starting top of the left column:

    Gloria
    Munda cor meum
    Jube Domine benedicere
    Credo

    Angelus Press set, same place:

    Gloria
    Credo

    FSSP set, same place:

    Aufer a nobis
    Gloria
    Muna cor meum
    Iube Domine benedicere
    Credo

    --------
    Center column:

    Una Voce set (lacking large art, has more space):

    Suscipe
    Offerimus
    In spiritu humilitatis
    Veni sanctificator
    Qui Pridie
    Simili Modo

    Angelus Press set (has large art at top):

    Qui Pridie
    Simili Modo

    FSSP set (has large art at top):

    Qui Pridie
    Simili Modo
    Placeat tibi

    ------

    Right hand column:

    Una Voce set:

    Suscipe Sancta Trinitas
    Haec commixtio
    Domine Jesu Christi (qui dixisti Apostolis)
    Domine Jesu Christi (Fili Dei vivi)
    Perceptio
    Placeat

    Angelus Press set:

    Placeat tibi
    Suscipe Sancte Pater
    Offerimus
    In Spiritu Humilitatis
    Veni, sanctificator
    Suscipe Sancta Trinitas

    FSSP Set:

    Suscipe sancte Pater
    Offerimus
    In spiritu humilitatis
    Veni sanctifactor
    Suscipe sancta Trinitas
    Domine Jesu Christi (qui dixisti Apostolis)
    Domine Jesu Christi (Fili Dei vivi)
    Perceptio Corporis

    -----

    Small card for right side of altar:

    Una Voce set:

    Deus, qui humanae
    Lavabo
    Corpus tuum

    Angelus Press set:

    Deus qui humane
    Lavabo
    Corpus Tuum

    FSSP set:

    Deus, qui humanae
    Lavabo

  • CatherineS
    Posts: 226
    Just in case this question ever comes up for anyone else, the feedback I've gotten is as follows (feedback was from two deacons, one at a traditional seminary, one at a diocesan seminary, and from an adult layman who has been an altar boy for the EF Mass since his youth):

    There are simpler altar cards that have fewer texts, and others that have more texts. The point is to save you having to flip back and forth to different pages in the Missal as often, to make the praying of the Mass smoother and more convenient. Most priests they know prefer the altar cards with more texts on them to maximize usefulness. Also, the more art there is on them, the less room for texts...but they look cool with art on them.
    Thanked by 1Incardination
  • Josh
    Posts: 90
    Years ago, when helping organise a monthly EF Mass in my own parish, I made a set of very plain altar cards with as many texts as seemed useful; I attach copies of the text for each - please advise if any embarrassing errors are inadvertently included!
    Thanked by 1CatherineS
  • JahazaJahaza
    Posts: 467
    Do those of you affiliated with the TLM know if there are 'standard' versions, or if this is really something only standardized when mass manufactured (surely it has been common to produce them by hand, such as in convents, at least until the 20th century?).

    So, technically altar cards were regulated as a form of liturgical publishing and so required the concordat cum originali to match the text in the current editio typica. Different editions of the missal differ in punctuation! However, as far as I can remember off the top of my head, there was no requirement regarding what was to be included and what was not, just that what was included match the Missal. If I remember correctly, only the center card is prescribed by the rubrics (though this may have changed in 1960) and the use of three is merely customary.

    Some of the liturgical authors have ideas about which prayers should be where, because the chalice gets in the way, certain prayers said when it is veiled should be at the top rather than further down even though they're said later in the Mass.
  • CatherineS
    Posts: 226
    Some of the liturgical authors have ideas about which prayers should be where, because the chalice gets in the way, certain prayers said when it is veiled should be at the top rather than further down even though they're said later in the Mass.

    Brilliant. Of course!

    I photographed a half dozen last night and found some 'miniature' (about half the standard size, but with the same content): good for travel, and for young priests with good eyes. lol.