Tenebrae in English- Lamentations of Jeremiah
  • Carol
    Posts: 257
    Our parish has tennebrae each year with the Lamentations of Jeremiah chanted in English. We have copies of the chants with square notes, but they are copies of copies of copies... I tried searching online but cannot see where I might find fresh copies or even copies with regular notation since we may have new cantors this year. Thank you in advance for any help you may be able to give me. In particular we need the Second Lamentation for Holy Saturday.
  • StimsonInRehabStimsonInRehab
    Posts: 1,197
    Are they similar to what Cantius does?
    Thanked by 1Carol
  • Carol
    Posts: 257
    I don't know how to answer that question. Is Cantius a person or a place?
  • Carol
    Posts: 257
    I did find pictures of the pages on a Google site from a Fr. Robert Repenning, but I cannot figure out how to do more than look at them. A few years ago my pastor asked me to sing one of the Lessons and gave me the blurry copy in square notes (which I really have no working knowledge) and told me I would figure it out. I used Youtube Gregorian chant instruction from Canada and video of others singing to get as close as I could.
  • Earl_GreyEarl_Grey
    Posts: 749
    Fr. Weber has a version of Tenebrae on his website. English & square note. Click on the title Tenebrae for the download. https://sacredmusicus.wordpress.com/?s=tenebrae
    Thanked by 2Carol CHGiffen
  • Jen
    Posts: 24
    .

    Thanked by 1Carol
  • Carol
    Posts: 257
    Thank you all, I was able to print what I needed. These are very clear square note versions of what we already had to work with.

    I still am curious to know if Cantius is a person or a place.
  • Incardination
    Posts: 366
    St. John Cantius - a parish in Chicago with a highly developed music program. It is home to the Canons Regular of that order.

    http://www.cantius.org/

    I guess you could argue that it is both! :)
    Thanked by 1Carol
  • Carol
    Posts: 257
    Thank you for the info, Incardination. I was doing a bit of teasing of Stimson who enjoys dishing it out, and also I really did not know.
  • Is it allowed to the Lamentations in the OF? If so, how?
  • Carol
    Posts: 257
    I don't know the specifics of what our parish does for Tenebrae, sorry. We have mostly spoken readings, some of which are done alternating sides of the church, and the Lessons are chanted. Some of the Lessons are chanted by women which may not be correct and everything is done in English. We have this at 9 am on Holy Thursday, Good Friday and Holy Saturday mornings instead of morning Mass. I have no idea how much of this is correct, but if it is not our new pastor will be certain to correct it ASAP!
  • PLTT
    Posts: 54
    ClemensRomanus, in the 2 year cycle of the Liturgy of the Hours, every alternate year the readings are taken from Lamentations. Good Friday has Lamentations 3:1-33. Holy Saturday has Lamentations 5:1-22. Holy Thursday (not part of the Triduum) has Lamentations 2:10-22.

    I mentioned a possible outline involving these readings here:
    https://forum.musicasacra.com/forum/discussion/14738/tenebrae-service-according-to-the-modern-loth
    Thanked by 2ClemensRomanus Carol
  • For any who like 'Old Church English', Palmer-Burgess made English versions of tenebrae for Holy Week.
    Thanked by 1Carol
  • StimsonInRehabStimsonInRehab
    Posts: 1,197
    Cantius is an old friend of mine. We go way back.
    Thanked by 1Carol
  • Carol
    Posts: 257
    Thank you for the further clarification. I did not know that Holy Thursday would not technically be a Tenebrae service. It makes sense, though, if you think about it liturgically since the Mass on Holy Thursday occurs, chronologically speaking, before the Passion and crucifixion of the Lord.
  • Incardination
    Posts: 366
    To be clear, considering
    Holy Thursday (not part of the Triduum)

    or that
    Holy Thursday would not technically be a Tenebrae service

    is not universal. I'm not familiar with excluding Holy Thursday as part of the Triduum, particularly as the word derives from "three days", and where any triduum precedes the corresponding feast. I'd be intrigued to see the source that indicates Holy Thursday is not part of the Triduum.

    In the EF, Matins and Lauds of all three days are what define Tenebrae... and that includes the celebration of Tenebrae that occurs in the AM rather than as anticipatory the previous evening (i.e. Wednesday evening for Holy Thursday, Thursday evening for Good Friday, and Friday evening for Holy Saturday).
    Thanked by 1Carol
  • CHGiffenCHGiffen
    Posts: 3,764
    To be clear:
    THE SACRED TRIDUUM

    Sundown on Holy Thursday to sundown on Easter Sunday is considered the most solemn part of the liturgical year. This three-day period is referred to as the Easter Triduum, also known as the Sacred Triduum, or Paschal Triduum.


    And, concerning Tenebrae:
    • Up to 1955 the three consecutive Tenebrae services for Holy Thursday, Good Friday and Holy Saturday, including the typical ceremonies such as the extinguishing of candles, and each of these three services anticipated on the previous day, were widely celebrated as an integral part of the liturgy of Holy Week in churches with a sufficient number of clergy wherever the Roman rite was followed. A rich tradition of music composed for these central occasions had developed.
    • From 1956 to 1970 the practice largely declined:
    • The 1955 papal document restored the celebration of Matins and Lauds of Holy Thursday, Good Friday and Holy Saturday to their original timing as morning services, with only a little allowance for anticipating any of them on the evening before. On these three days attention shifted from what became morning services to the services that were now to be held in the afternoon or evening. Communal celebration of Matins and Lauds became limited generally to communities that observed the full Divine Office in congregational form. Matins and Lauds, having lost their exceptional character, provided composers with little incentive to produce new music for them and there was no demand for grand performances of the existing music earlier composed for Tenebrae.
    • The Roman Breviary, as updated in 1961, did not mention any specific Tenebrae ceremonies to accompany the no longer anticipated Matins and Lauds of Maundy Thursday, Good Friday and Holy Saturday.
    • Finally, in the wake of the Second Vatican Council, Matins and Lauds throughout the year were completely reformed. Matins, for instance, no longer had the nine psalms and Lauds the five psalms that determined the number of candles extinguished in the Tenebrae celebration.

    Thanked by 2Incardination Carol
  • Incardination
    Posts: 366
    Thanks, CHG...

    From further research, it looks like a lot of OF parishes offering Tenebrae are not necessarily doing something according to the LOTH but are actually doing Tenebrae according to the pre-55 ceremonies and rites, including anticipating on the previous night, though perhaps with English text rather than Latin (unclear).

    Our cathedral has Tenebrae on all three nights, but I'm not sure what they use (I'm usually busy!!).

    We sing Tenebrae in the AM on the three respective days of the Triduum, and observe rites that are similar but not identical to pre-55. It's unclear what source you are quoting, but the ceremonies are clearly defined somewhere, though perhaps not in the breviary. I'll ask our MC where the ceremonies are defined. There still is the extinguishing of the candles, though not the hiding of the remaining candle, nor the knocking / noise, nor the bringing back of the remaining candle.
    Thanked by 2CHGiffen Carol
  • eft94530eft94530
    Posts: 1,488
    Matins, for instance, no longer had the nine psalms and Lauds the five psalms that determined the number of candles extinguished in the Tenebrae celebration.

    Matins 9 + Lauds 5 = 14

    INVITATORY
    HYMN
    OFFICE OF READINGS
    Antiphon and Psalm 2
    Antiphon and Psalm 2
    Antiphon and Psalm 2
    Verse
    Reading and Responsory
    Reading and Responsory
    MORNING PRAYER
    Antiphon and Psalm 2
    Antiphon and Canticle 2
    Antiphon and Psalm 2
    Reading and Responsory
    Antiphon and Canticle of Zechariah 2
    Intercessions and Lord's Prayer
    Concluding Prayer
    Dismissal

    (2+2+2) + (2+2+2+2) = 14
  • Carol
    Posts: 257
    I believe I am now more confused than ever! I am glad that it is not my responsibility to be certain that I am following the current rulings on these Church matters. We do extinguish candles. The booklets which we use are so old that I think they were typed up (and I do mean typewritten) in the 1970's.
    Thanked by 1CHGiffen
  • http://smcs.on.ca/files_docs/content/jubulee_hymns_and_tenebrae/Tenebrae Booklet.pdf
    This is our musical setting of the Tenebrae, which happens every year on the Wednesday of Holy Week, and of course at many locations elsewhere around the area at different times. It's fun if you gather some SMCS alumni or even just a TB choir to sing this. It's not musically spectacular but it's fun and has deep roots with SMCS. It has a guide in the back for a possible scripture service but I don't think it would necessarily help with Carol's questions.
  • Hi all - I've just newly typeset and reworked the Lamentations we've used for a long time here at Dunwoodie; they were originally set by my predecessor.

    They are available here.

    A few notes:
    - In keeping with the current breviary, the translation used is the 1970 NAB, not the newer revised version.
    - One of the Lamentations each day has been set to a Mozarabic tone, though I haven't yet been able to trace the exact version of the original melody. (Please let me know if you know its origin!) This was the excellent work of my predecessor, and we've carried on this tradition at Dunwoodie because it's beloved by the seminarians and the visitors who come for the office. The other two lections are set according to the Gregorian tone.
    - I've only included Good Friday and Holy Saturday because, beginning this year, we are following the prescriptions discussed above of beginning our marking of the Triduum with the Mass of the Lord's Supper rather than Thursday morning Tenebræ. If you're looking for Holy Thursday, you can use the old scan available here, though the typesetting isn't updated.
    Thanked by 2CHGiffen Carol
  • PLTT
    Posts: 54
    Re: the ceremonies of the EF Tenebrae -

    The ceremonies of the Tenebrae were largely contained in two books: the Breviary and the Ceremoniale Episcoporum. In the 1955-6 revision of the breviary and Holy Week, the breviary rubrics with altered. The ceremonies of the Ceremoniale were modified by the 1957 Ritus Pontificalis Ordinis Hebdomadae Sanctae Instaurati.

    The changes made in 1956/7 and 1961 were as follows:

    1. Matins and Lauds were no longer allowed to be anticipated - they had to be celebrated in the morning of the day. The Matins of Holy Thursday could be anticipated on Wednesday because of the Chrism Mass, but (under the 1961 rubrics) Lauds could never be anticipated.

    2. The rubric of the Breviary referring to the hiding of the candle and the strepitus was suppressed. Thus the last candle was simply left lit until the end of the service.

    3. The Miserere was removed from the conclusion.

    4. The candles on the altar were modified to account for the ceremonial changes to Holy Week. While pre-55 had 6 candles on the altar for all 3 days, the reformed rite called for 6 candles were used on Holy Thursday, none on Good Friday, and 4 (surrounding the Cross) on Holy Saturday.

    For a scholarly overview of historical ceremonies (and the history of Tenebrae in general) I would recommend "Fire and Light in the Western Triduum" by A.J. MacGregor. He shows the evolution of some ceremonies (e.g. restriction of candle extinguishing to only psalms, instead of psalms and responsories) and debunks some widespread, commonly-heard theories (e.g. candles were extinguished because dawn was approaching).
    Thanked by 2CHGiffen eft94530
  • "Fire and Light in the Western Triduum" by A.J. MacGregor

    Great book!
  • StimsonInRehabStimsonInRehab
    Posts: 1,197
    Casavant - Msgr. Ronan did some quality stuff. It's a shame he isn't better known.
    Thanked by 1Casavant Organist
  • musician
    Posts: 1
    I recall my father singing at Tenebrae in the early 50’s. I recall the haunting music for the text, Jerusalem; music-wise the melody went ( in the key of C,) c d e e e (hold, ) d f e d e ( both sets of notes on the text Jerusalem. I would love to access that music - I would think it was chant, and sung in Latin, as this was pre-Vatican. Sincerely, BRENDA Mooney
  • Carol
    Posts: 257
    The settings as linked by Jennifer Donaldson above are what we have used as far as I can tell. The Holy Thursday settings look exactly like what we already had, except they are cleaner and easier to read! We especially need video or mp3 of the Lesson 2 of Holy Saturday. I think it is the most challenging and also most beautiful when done well.

    If the newly typeset Lamentations were done using a music program, does the program allow the creation of mp3 files with that fake "wa-wa" sounding voice midi? If yes could those be shared?

    Thank you again everyone!
  • Incardination
    Posts: 366
    Musician, I believe you are referring to the end of the Lamentations...

    Image:
    322 x 167 - 13K
  • hilluminar
    Posts: 89
    eft94530, the 15th candle was the candle in the center of the hearse, called the Christ Candle. It was never extinguished. So there were 14 candles which were extinguished during the service, and one which was not.
  • hilluminar
    Posts: 89
    Forgot to mention, the Christ Candle is hidden behind the altar after the Benedictus antiphon, and then shown again after the tumultuous noise is made. If your church has an altar affixed to the wall, a screen must be made to hide the candle on the altar, on the Epistle side, according to Fortescue.
  • Carol
    Posts: 257
    I am bumping this because it may be of use in another current discussion. Sorry to those who will be annoyed.
    Thanked by 1CHGiffen