Laetare relaxation question
  • Kathy
    Posts: 5,016
    Is instrumental music allowed throughout the 4th week of Lent, or only on Laetare Sunday itself?
  • irishtenoririshtenor
    Posts: 1,062
    I believe it is only on Laetare Sunday itself, but I can't cite you chapter and verse on it. Babies wake up early and I need to get to bed!
  • The Roman Missal specifies Laetare Sunday only, the same way rose is only worn on the Sunday and then violet returns the next day.
    Thanked by 1eft94530
  • Note that the directions specify organ only:

    ... The music of the organ only, or the harmonium, is allowed on the III Sunday of Advent and the IV Sunday of Lent ...



  • Kevin_Keil
    Posts: 2
    That is not correct. From the GIRM of the current Roman Missal:
    In Lent the playing of the organ and musical instruments is allowed only in order to support the
    singing. Exceptions, however, are Laetare Sunday (Fourth Sunday of Lent), Solemnities, and Feasts.
    Thanked by 1CharlesW
  • a_f_hawkins
    Posts: 1,385
    That's right, and for the OF flowers too. From GIRM2011(E&W):
    305. ... During Lent it is forbidden for the altar to be decorated with flowers. Exceptions, however, are Laetare Sunday (Fourth Sunday of Lent), Solemnities, and Feasts.

    313. The organ and other lawfully approved musical instruments ... In Lent the playing of the organ and musical instruments is allowed only in order to support the singing. Exceptions, however, are Laetare Sunday (Fourth Sunday of Lent), Solemnities, and Feasts.
    And Advent requires only musical 'moderation'. @JonathanKK is correct for the EF.
    But it is not obvious whether the floral rules apply only to the immediate surroundings of the mensa or mean anywhere in the sanctuary. Particularly where, as commonly, the mensa has been shifted forward leaving what was the retable and the tabernacle, as a separate reredos. I would assume the term altar does here apply to the reredos.
  • CharlesW
    Posts: 10,005
    Purple Sundays - accompany singing, only.
    Pink Sunday - play and accompany singing.
  • Andrew Malton
    Posts: 785
    What does anyone seriously imagine the mysterious phrase "lawfully approved musical instruments" ("instrumenta musica legitime probata") actually means?

    The Bishops' Conference has the power (#393) to decide which instruments are "vere apta" or in a pinch "aptari possint"... but is there a Conference on the planet that has actually exercised it?

  • a_f_hawkins
    Posts: 1,385
    AFAIK our Bishops' Conference (E&W), has not even approved any texts for the Introit etc., and therefor nothing is licit except GR and GS (including presumably the translations in the Processional). This does not stop any old rubbish being sung, even (or especially) when a bishop is celebrating. I would love to be shown to be wrong.
  • Andrew Malton
    Posts: 785
    I propose that if there is no approved liturgical translation of a liturgical book into the vernacular in use, then a previously approved translation (eg a hand missal) or approved translation of the same text for some other purpose, is licit.

    So, for example, the Roman Gradual would be licitly be sung using the text from an old approved hand Missal, or using the psalms from the approved lectionary.

    There is, by the way, and approved (ICEL) translation of the Simplex. It's not very good, it sounds like the bad old ICEL Sacramentary, but it exists, and By Flowing Waters uses it.

    Is it true, @a_f_hawkins, that E&W has no approved hymnal for Mass?
    Thanked by 1CCooze
  • a_f_hawkins
    Posts: 1,385
    I know of none, the relevant part of our GIRM says:
    ... In the dioceses of England Wales the Entrance Chant may be chosen from among the following: the antiphon with its Psalm from the Graduale Romanum or the Graduale Simplex, or another chant that is suited to the sacred action, the day, or the time of year, and whose text has been approved by the Conference of Bishops of England and Wales.
    If there is no singing at the Entrance, the antiphon given in the Missal is recited ...
    The Society of St Gregory (SSG) has published a Processional (updated 2012) "with the approval of the Dept of Christian Life and Worship of CBCEW" This gives translations by ICEL or SSG of RM, GR and GS antiphons (and psalms), no tunes. No church or cathedral that I attend appears to use it except Westminster Cathedral (but perhaps I don't get about enough). It clearly has not stopped four hymn sandwich yet, (and that includes Metropolitan Cathedrals).