Thank you, Richard Rice!
  • G
    Posts: 1,387
    I meant to post this last Sunday after the choir Mass,and then got busy and just remembered now as i was making up the programs for tomorrow's choir Mass.

    Thank you, thank you, thank you.
    Some plans went awry for our prelude, and very last minute I taught them the refrain from your communion for the man born blind, slowed it way down, and did some very long (I hope not too self-indulgent,) pauses and fermatas, extreme dynamic contrasts -- everyone was very moved.

    I am so very grateful for all you have done.

    (Save the Liturgy, Save the World)
  • Jeffrey TuckerJeffrey Tucker
    Posts: 3,624
    His collection of choral propers is the most fruitful collection of Catholic music to come along in a very long time--perhaps many decades? I don't know. but it is astounding.
  • As long as we're thanking Richard Rice, I would like to let him know that we've been using the Tract from his simplified gradual. Two months ago it was Rossini, then Chants Abreges, now Rice. By next year we could be doing the full Gregorian Tract once or twice a month. And the year after that, perhaps the Gradual... and so on.

    At any rate, I really do appreciate your work, Richard! You consistently provide quality tradition-based alternatives that point in the direction of the ideal. And for free! May God reward you.

    Perhaps this topic could morph into a spiritual bouquet of some sort. My rosary will be prayed for your intentions tonight. :)
  • RagueneauRagueneau
    Posts: 2,592
    It is hard to thank Mr. Rice enough for all he has done, especially in terms of all the beauteous Gregorian chant editions, polyphonic compositions, and Responsorial Psalms he's generously made available. Those who don't realize Mr. Rice is also a prolific composer of Responsorial Psalms might want to check out, for example, Option no. 12 on this page.
  • Okay, bolstering Richard Rice Day-
    Today marked a first for us-the Offertory Antiphon-courtesy of the Simple Choral Gradual. Took 20 seconds before Mass to acquaint the congregation with the refrain. 'Twas beautiful. Sang Introit, Offertorio, Communio in one Mass!
    Two of which were Rice settings, Thanks Richard.
  • miacoyne
    Posts: 1,805
    I know I'm asking for trouble for saying this (ready to duck), but maybe people in this forum can consider this. We know that the composers who post beautiful music here are doing it for the noble cause, not for material gains, but they are not monks, and have to support themselves and some even their families. The Church also tells us that the musicians should get paid rightfully for their work. I was wondering we could pay some nominal fee to them or to CMAA for the use of their music. That way we are helping each other? If I said something not good, please forgive me.
  • G
    Posts: 1,387
    Certainly no one will stop anyone from making a donation to CMAA.

    (Save the Liturgy, save the World)
  • Jeffrey TuckerJeffrey Tucker
    Posts: 3,624
    And earmarked is great too.
  • Miacoyne,
    I've had people from upstate New YorK down to Florida and back to the west coast come up to me telling me that they'd heard my tunes in their home parishes, and OMG, did I really write that?!?
    Why, yes dear, and copyrighted it as well. Never been paid a cent, never had anyone in(formally) request permission to use, record or reprint. Do I care. No, I don't. I care that I get paid by the parish for doing my job thoroughly (which includes composition) but I've never expected recognition, much less income from the privilege of writing sacred or liturgical music. That's a weird sort of kinship with Bach and "soli Deo gloria"- is how I choose to regard this matter.
    I'm just glad I've lived long enough to see the new paradigm of free sharing of that which no one owns but God (and which Jeffrey has long championed) actually come into real-time and wide-spread effective use.
    Let it unravel the monopoly (and, yes, simony, as Jeff articulated in SLaC) that has infected our worship foundation.
  • Richard R.
    Posts: 682
    I appreciate (and commend) your thoughtfulness, Mia, and would never reject such a sincere gesture... simoneous or not.
  • Jeffrey TuckerJeffrey Tucker
    Posts: 3,624
    Just so that we are clear on the Simony charge, it comes from a distinction made by Fr. Skeris between charging for composition or layout or distribution or whatever, which is wholly justified, and charging for the legal right to use indulgenced liturgical texts in the creation of the products for distribution, which is incompatible with Catholic ethical teaching. This distinction has deep roots in Catholic history (e.g. charging for Mass vs. charging for a special intention). Those things which are infinitely reproducible and obligatory cannot command a price but those things which are scarce and must be allocated can command a price (with some special exceptions, e.g. blessed objects, relics, etc.)
  • miacoyne
    Posts: 1,805
    Thanks, Jeffrey for the clarification. I don't know the rules very much, and I don't have composing skills either. And as a performer, I should like the idea of free sharing of church music, especially after the misuse of copyright laws by some publishing companies for their material gain. But when church musicians, like directors, organists, and professional singers are paid for their professional work and skills, I wonder why composers cannot be paid for their work? Especially those composers who have to rely on their composing profession for their living? There aren' t many composition majors in music department these days, because they know that they cannot make living with it, unless they become like Haas and Haugen, or take composition only as a side job. Are we pomoting and supporting the composers, who could be more prolific and write more beautiful music for church if their living can be secured materialistcally. I feel that it's more than justice. I know MDs and organists don't make much, but they can still manage their living from doing what they liked to do (or at least with what they are trained to do), but composers can't. I don't think they are supported well. I just wish we can support and help them, so they can use their talent more fully, and we get to see more of their fruits.
  • It is good to see this well-deserved recognition of Richard Rice.

    If I may add yet another dimension of this multi-talented musician, with about twenty years of experience singing and directing Gregorian Chant, Richard is one of a very small number of people in this country worthy of the title of Master of Gregorian Chant. He current directs two scholas each Sunday morning. He directs the volunteer schola at Our Lady Queen of Poland, in Silver Spring, MD and co-directs a largely professional schola at St. John's, in McLean VA. His rendering of the chant is flawless and spiritually uplifting and his direction precise, focused, and generously targeted toward nurturing the abilities of his singers.