Sanctus Bells Questions
  • bkenney27bkenney27
    Posts: 444
    Simple question: Is it allowed in the Novus Ordo to ring the Sanctus bells at the *gasp* SANCTUS as they are in the Traditional Latin Mass? (I'm certain I could probably find an answer somewhere, but yous guys is so smaht.)
  • CCoozeCCooze
    Posts: 737
    I really think that the organ/choir loft needs a bicycle bell - or some such - for when there aren't servers to ring the Sanctus bells.
    Thanked by 1CHGiffen
  • I have observed many OF uses of sanctus bells.
    Sanctus bells are rung with abandon in the Ordinariate Use.
    Tower bells, too!
    These are rung at the elevation.
    I believe some others here do the same.

    ...organ/choir loft needs...

    I have seen a few sanctus bells resting on a velvet cushion on organ benches.
  • Ben YankeBen Yanke
    Posts: 3,114
    A lot can be justified by the second half of ¶ 42:

    Therefore, attention should be paid to what is determined by this General Instruction and the traditional practice of the Roman Rite and to what serves the common spiritual good of the People of God, rather than private inclination or arbitrary choice.


    Ambiguity...Might as well use it for good while we still can.
  • I really think that the organ/choir loft needs a bicycle bell - or some such - for when there aren't servers to ring the Sanctus bells.


    Our organist uses the chimes on the organ in the event that there aren't servers to do it. However, since we usually have at least 9 servers for the school Mass, this is NEVER a problem.
    Thanked by 1eft94530
  • CCoozeCCooze
    Posts: 737
    Novus Ordo weddings with just cantor + organ get awkward without a server, and so without bells (usually just if there's a guest priest (which isn't a rarity, since ours is the most traditional, and therefore "prettiest" church in our deanery)).
    I've suggested that chimes are better than nothing. Perhaps I should just bring my own bicycle bell along to weddings I sing at/for; just in case.
    Thanked by 1ClergetKubisz
  • CCooze -
    Bicycle bells are rather distinctive.
    On hearing them one might instinctively turn to see who was pedaling down the aisle.
    A nice dinner bell would do.
    Or, purchase a set of sanctus bells and keep them at the organ for when needed.
  • CCoozeCCooze
    Posts: 737
    It does sound a bit like the bells rung when the priest enters during a daily/Low Mass.
  • On hearing them one might instinctively turn to see who was pedaling down the aisle.


    It's probably the priest in an effort to "increase participation.".
  • ...if we could do this:

    Indeed!
    Awe.
    Awe is what is missing in modern liturgical praxis.
  • bkenney27bkenney27
    Posts: 444
    I actually do have a set in the loft to ring in case the servers aren't present or miss the epiclesis.

    So, the verdict is that it is perfectly within bounds to ring the Sanctus bells:

    - At the conclusion of the Preface and beginning of the Sanctus (thrice).
    - At the epiclesis.
    - At the consecration and elevation

    I also occasionally ring the tower bells thrice at the consecration on Solemnities, etc., but it's a manual ring so I don't always have time to do it and get back to the organ, haha.
  • In one parish nearby here, as I understand it, people programmed their phones to make a Sanctus Bell sort of sound, and other people took out their keychains and shook them vigorously at the (otherwise) appropriate time.
  • Chris -
    I'm resisting the urge to display the yellow square!
  • Jackson,

    I'm glad you're not going to shoot the messenger. Some things are too good to be true. Others are too true to be good. My story sounds like it belongs in something by Thomas Day.....
  • SalieriSalieri
    Posts: 2,478
    Some things are too good to be true. Others are too true to be good.

    Yes, like the time the women's group of a neighboring parish had a brassiere fitting lesson in the church hall. (The title of the program was "We Need a Lift!")
  • CCoozeCCooze
    Posts: 737
    brassiere fitting lesson


    That reminds me of "The Trouble With Angels," with Rosalind Russell.
    "'But, Reverend Mother, I don't know anything about.. binders.'
    Brassieres, Sister, brassieres.'"
  • The question about bells raises another question of mine: Must the Sanctus Bells or other liturgical utilities (organ, priest's chair/cathedra, etc) be blessed before use in Mass?
  • SalieriSalieri
    Posts: 2,478
    Normally, they should; but, from what I understand, they are also blessed by being used for their sacred purpose. Some items have a rather complex ritual with their blessings, think of the baptism of church tower bells, the consecration of an altar, exorcism of salt and water, etc.. It should be noted that "blessing" anything with the prayers from The Book of Blessings, doesn't result in an actual blessing, anyway. Priests should always bless things using the older Rituale Romanum, using real Holy Water blessed the proper way as found in the same R.R. -- as least, so say most exorcists. (But whether or not there is a blessing for brassieres, I don't know.)
    Thanked by 1CCooze
  • Liam
    Posts: 3,816
    " It should be noted that "blessing" anything with the prayers from The Book of Blessings, doesn't result in an actual blessing, anyway. "

    That's an opinion, not a fact. Just sayin'.
    Thanked by 1Spriggo