Good Friday Chanted Gospel
  • musicman923
    Posts: 239
    Hi Everyone,

    I'm very excited because my pastor is allowing me and two other musicians to do a chanted setting of the Good Friday Gospel this year. This is a first time in the history of the parish that a chanted Gospel setting will be sung. The church is celebrating it's 145 anniverary this year. We are using the chanted setting by Fr. Rembert (published by WLP)

    My question to fellow forum members:
    Should the priest bless those who are singing the Gospel reading while the Gospel acclamation is being sung??

    When I asked my pastor this question, he said "no" blessing over the singers because he does not want to confuse the role of deacon vs. singers for the chanted Gospel setting. What are the rules and is the correct??

    Looking forward to hearing answers.
  • Ben YankeBen Yanke
    Posts: 3,114
    Isn't it required for an ordained minister to proclaim at least the part of Christ?
  • Ben YankeBen Yanke
    Posts: 3,114
    Also, that issue aside, I'm not clear on your question.

    Are you questioning the timing of the blessing during the acclamation, or are you questioning giving a blessing at all, which just happens to be during the acclamation?
  • melofluentmelofluent
    Posts: 4,160
    Isn't it required for an ordained minister to proclaim at least the part of Christ?

    Really?
  • Ben YankeBen Yanke
    Posts: 3,114
    Well, it turns out a quick glance at the missal answers both questions: 3 lay people are ok, and the lay people don't receive blessings.

    Palm Sunday Rubric no. 21 (the good friday rubrics say to proclaim it in the same manner as palm sunday):

    It is read by a Deacon or, if there is no Deacon, by a Priest. It may also be read by readers, with the part of Christ, if possible, reserved to a Priest. Deacons, but not others, ask for the blessing of the Priest before singing the Passion, as at other times before the Gospel.
  • CHGiffenCHGiffen
    Posts: 4,370
    The rubrics are the same as for the Palm Sunday Passion Gospel:

    21. The narrative of the Lord’s Passion is read without candles and without incense, with no greeting or signing of the book. It is read by a Deacon or, if there is no Deacon, by a Priest. It may also be read by readers, with the part of Christ, if possible, reserved to a Priest.
    Deacons, but not others, ask for the blessing of the Priest before singing the Passion, as
    at other times before the Gospel.

    Hence, the part of Christ may, if necessary, be read (sung) by a lay person.

    Here, we are chanting the Good Friday St John Passion with one of the Priests chanting the role of Christ. I am chanting part of the Evangelist (Narrator or Chronista), and another lay person is chanting the Turba (or Synagoga). We are using the Dominican chant tone setting of the Lectionary (NAB) text, arranged and pointed by myself. I'm off to rehearse it in a few minutes, in fact!
    Thanked by 1ronkrisman
  • doneill
    Posts: 191
    When is it not "possible" for a priest to read Christ? Wouldn't there always be a priest present? What this, and other instructions regarding things giving preference to a priest, seem to be saying in more polite language is, "If the priest is truly a singing disaster, then it's OK for a layperson to do it." Seriously, I am interested in where people on this forum draw the line. For instance, if, for the Exsultet, you had the option of a deacon who could sing it, but poorly, or a lay cantor who could sing it beautifully, what's the better option?
  • Adam WoodAdam Wood
    Posts: 6,350
    if possible


    I think the sense of the original Latin is more like, "unless you don't want that to happen."
  • matthewjmatthewj
    Posts: 2,641
    For instance, if, for the Exsultet, you had the option of a deacon who could sing it, but poorly, or a lay cantor who could sing it beautifully, what's the better option?


    The lay person would sing it.
  • I think the sense of the original Latin is more like, "unless you don't want that to happen."


    Unclear whether you were being tongue-in-cheek, but FWIW the original Latin, "si fieri potest," means "if it can be done."
  • Adam WoodAdam Wood
    Posts: 6,350
    Unclear whether you were being tongue-in-cheek


    I'm sure it was clear to some people.
  • matthewjmatthewj
    Posts: 2,641
    Another scenario.. you have:
    1) A deacon who could do an okay/passable job at the Exsultet
    2) A priest who could do a very good job at the Exsultet
    3) 9 lay people who could do an excellent job at the Exsultet.

    #2 gets the victory.
    Thanked by 2doneill Kathy
  • CharlesW
    Posts: 10,510
    We have a deacon with a professional quality voice who will do a "very good job at the Exsultet."
    Thanked by 1MatthewRoth
  • doneill
    Posts: 191
    I agree, Matthew - although hurt egos can complicate that equation too. We're all supposed to be doing our jobs in humble service for the good of the liturgy, of course, but it can still involve much pastoral finesse. And often, it's not really the music director's decision to make, which means we have to be mighty persuasive.
  • matthewjmatthewj
    Posts: 2,641
    I remember when a representative for a popular ministry-scheduling software came to do a demonstration for a church that I worked for... I asked if anyone had ever given any thought to adding a "preferred" or ranking system for lectors so the best lectors got scheduled slightly more frequently than... She looked at me like I was a horrifying monster with sixteen heads.
  • I'm sure it was clear to some people.


    image
  • MatthewRoth
    Posts: 1,224
    I realize that in most cases, we are working with permanent deacons. That being said, it's an advantage in the EF for days such as Good Friday-when there can be no concelebration anyways!- and Holy Saturday for in cases when there are multiple priests to vest the priest as a deacon so that he can sing the Passion and Exultet.