Using the same psalm setting for a really long time?
  • My church has been using the same one for at least a month. Because I don't know the ins and outs of this stuff I was wondering if there was a reason or if this is normal. They've also been recycling the same communion hymn for a few weeks. Now, in my position I spend many many hours each week picking new things and I feel sure that someone would notice or complain if we did the same stuff all the time. But, I work at a Presbyterian church so things are obviously different. Thoughts?
    Thanked by 1PurpleSquirrel
  • I'm struggling with Psalms as well. You are not alone. How big is your parish? I don't know much about the Presbyterian church (sorry) but I do know that the same Psalm tone can be used seasonally in some of the smaller RC parishes, or parishes that don't have a strong music ministry. By season, I mean Ordinary Time, Advent, Lent, Easter, & Christmas in their entirety.
  • ClergetKubiszClergetKubisz
    Posts: 1,895
    Yes, the psalm tone can be recycled if necessary, but the correct text can still be sung. A more grievous issue would be if the same text is reused week after week: they're supposed to be different each time. Reusing hymns isn't uncommon, especially in places where the singers (choir, cantors, not PIPs) are not adequate to the task of learning new songs each week and/or in places where a congregational repertoire (whatever that is) has not been established. Simple English Propers would be my prescription for that situation.
  • My parish is one of the largest-if not the largest-in the city but suffers from a so-so music program.
    @Clerget: They've been using the same psalm text as well as the tune...It's #39 in the Gather...*sigh*
  • Oh, for clarification I meant my home church, not the one I work for...just realized that might be confusing
  • chonakchonak
    Posts: 7,796
    That song is based on Psalm 27, and that psalm is listed as a seasonal psalm for Ordinary Time, so it's not an inappropriate choice.

    The text in Gather does not match the U.S. Lectionary text for Psalm 27. It's possible that it might be from some other approved Catholic scripture version, or it might just be the composer's paraphrase. The copyright date is 1983, so we can rule out any later Scripture edition as being the source. The credits in the Gather book cite only the composer, so I expect it's probably his adaptation.

    That makes me question whether this text can be legitimately used at all in place of a responsorial psalm.
  • A more grievous issue would be if the same text is reused week after week: they're supposed to be different each time.


    No, that is not a requirement. and hardly Grevious. Otherwise the Vatican would not have created the Graduale Simplex and we would not have the groundbreaking work By Flowing Waters by Paul Ford.

    You may sing a different one every week and people will not sing. You can repeat a psalm tone, an antiphon week after week and more and more people will sing it.

    There are no Grevious error police to ticket you for doing things that increase the number of people singing. Purple Squirrel reigns from the treetops and power lines hung across the road.
    Thanked by 1eft94530
  • Noel, that seems to be true: the only thing that matters is how many people sing.
  • Yes, and that, I believe, IS a Grevious Error! Glad you said that!
  • Thank you everyone :-) And if they are repeating this psalm to encourage people to sing I think it is working, because I am starting to hear some PIP's softly singing along with the verses lol...Almost no one sings at my church so this is an improvement!
  • GIRM (US) 61In order, however, that the people may be able to sing the Psalm response more readily, texts of some responses and Psalms have been chosen for the various seasons of the year or for the various categories of Saints. These may be used in place of the text corresponding to the reading whenever the Psalm is sung. If the Psalm cannot be sung, then it should be recited in such a way that it is particularly suited to fostering meditation on the word of God.

    In the dioceses of the United States of America, the following may also be sung in place of the Psalm assigned in the Lectionary for Mass: either the proper or seasonal antiphon and Psalm from the Lectionary, as found either in the Roman Gradual or Simple Gradual or in another musical setting; or an antiphon and Psalm from another collection of the psalms and antiphons, including psalms arranged in metrical form, providing that they have been approved by the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops or the diocesan Bishop. Songs or hymns may not be used in place of the responsorial Psalm.


    .GIRM (UK) 61 However, in order that the people may
    be able to sing the Psalm response more easily, texts of some responses and Psalms
    have been chosen for the different times of the year or for the different categories of
    Saints. These may be used instead of the text corresponding to the reading whenever
    the Psalm is sung. If the Psalm cannot be sung, then it should be recited in a way that is
    particularly suited to fostering meditation on the Word of God.
    Instead of the Psalm assigned in the Lectionary, there may be sung either the
    Responsorial Gradual from the Graduale Romanum, or the Responsorial Psalm or the
    Alleluia Psalm from the Graduale Simplex, as described in these books.
    Thanked by 1eft94530
  • " These may be used instead of the text corresponding to the reading whenever
    the Psalm is sung."

    Interesting...Even if the Psalm has nothing to do with the reading? That was what drew my attention in the first place but hey now I know. This was helpful, thank you!
  • Is there any truth to a rumor that there is a "missing page" that reads:

    "Songs or hymns may not be used in place of the Propers."

    [it's in purple, people....]
  • Our parish here in the Philippines has been using the tones, mostly tone viii for ordinary, tone ii for lent and advent, and tone v for easter season. The people really like the tones because they are consistent and dependable (and tone viii has made it so easy so they don't get hung up on learning new notes and can engage the text immediately), and they only need hear the response once to catch on to the pointing.
  • At our church, we've been using the same psalm tone for the entrance antiphon for several months. People are slowly starting to sing with us.
  • There are seasonal psalms which are permitted to replace amy other psalm from the same liturgical season. Not ideal, but handy to have.
  • What's ideal, a few people singing from the Graduale Romanum, or most of the congregation singing an antiphon to a seasonal psalm?

    Does not a seasonal psalm fit the season and emphasize the spirit of the season? Would it not be better to move on to more ornately composed seasonal psalms to improve the singing of the choir and the congregation?

    Are there more "active participation gold stars" for singing music that changes all the time and fewer sing as a result?