The House that Love Is Building by Sarah Hart
  • lacrimosa
    Posts: 42
    For some reason this doesn't sit well with me. It doesn't seem to say anything meaningful or in any way challenge me to be a better person. I'm ok just the way I am.

    Or have I missed the point?

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wVNYeAYfHmE
  • MarkB
    Posts: 865
    Sarah Hart's music is among the most vapid and deplorable that OCP is publishing these days. You see, Scripture, liturgical tradition and liturgical guidelines, even Catholic faith don't matter to OCP anymore. It's just whatever their artists feel in their hearts that they think should be sung at Mass now, and they are desperately throwing everything at the wall to see if anything sticks. CCLI is taking market share away from OCP in the more "progressive" Catholic parishes, and OCP is frantic to try to get a "Catholic P&W" sound/catalogue that succeeds because the Bob Hurd cash cow from the 80s has finally stopped giving milk. I'm slowly phasing OCP and GIA music out of my parish repertoire, even the older stuff. I won't touch the new music at all.

    Here are the lyrics, so you don't have to listen to the video:

    In the house that Love is building,
    There is room enough for all,
    Endless welcome in her rafters,
    Mercy singing through her walls.
    Here is refuge for all people
    From every tribe and tongue.
    In the house that love is building
    There is room for everyone.

    In the garden Love is tending
    There’s a great and boundless feast,
    Where the seeds of hope are planted,
    And the yield is heaven’s peace.
    As the field becomes a harvest
    For the many hungry ones,
    In the garden Love is tending
    There’s enough for everyone.

    Oh, the song that Love is raising
    Is of pure, unending light
    In the voices of her people,
    rising to eternal skies.
    Now the darkness shall be swallowed
    By the Living Word of God.
    Oh, the song that Love is raising
    Is a song for everyone.

    In the house that Love is building
    There is room for everyone.
    Thanked by 1Brian Michael Page
  • I would say that the text is boarder line incoherent. However, I think the song means to say that you don't have to be perfect to come to the Lord. I think it kind of misses the point though and comes across as sins don't matter. We know this isn't true. We all sin, and it is important that we recognize our sin before God and ask for his mercy. It kind of misses the asking for mercy part.

    I have only read the text and not listened to it, but if I just came across the text without any context, I probably would not associate it with church.
    Thanked by 1hilluminar
  • ServiamScores
    Posts: 2,007
    To me it reads as a sappy rethink of ‘all are welcome’.
  • Jeffrey Quick
    Posts: 1,897
    This text does not actually tell me one thing about God or the Church. It is very nearly content-free.

    tl;dr: "Love is a good thing."
    Thanked by 2hilluminar LauraKaz
  • ServiamScores
    Posts: 2,007
    I particularly liked the image of a giant Jesus chomping on the darkness like a giant cookie. It will be swallowed, after all.
  • anymore.


    How long has this been true?
  • Schönbergian
    Posts: 1,063
    It's harmless, but substanceless.

    The problem is that Catholic liturgy is all but insubstantial.
  • lacrimosa
    Posts: 42
    On our church's facebook page announcing this song as our "gathering song" is this Sarah Hart quote:

    "A great church must love greatly. A great church must welcome greatly. A great church must see the dignity of every human being and welcome them into their church family."

    I don't mean to pick on this woman because she seems to be very nice, but what is this statement? Is it supposed to be profound? How is it that she is not only writing liturgical music but is leading retreats?

    What does it mean to "welcome greatly"?

    Am I being too cynical by reading between the lines? Everyone we welcome won't want to come if they know they have to give up their sins to be in good standing with the family.

  • MarkB
    Posts: 865
    You're not being cynical. You're noticing the vapidness. To help you fill in the lines, browse her Facebook page:
    https://www.facebook.com/sarahhartmusicofficial/

    Her religion is "luv". She writes about "luv". She preaches "luv".

    You ask how is it that she's writing liturgical music and leading retreats without any background in theology or spirituality or liturgy?

    Because the church is a mess, and there's a market among a certain demographic of post-menopausal women for her vapid sentimentality about luv. And there's such widespread liturgical illiteracy that some people (mostly in that same demographic) think her hollow music about luv should be sung at Mass.

    Sarah posted this on Pentecost on her Facebook page:

    Blessed Pentecost everyone! Remember....we need not ask "come, Holy Spirit"; rather, we live knowing that the spirit is already alive in us, ever present. The spirit is ALWAYS here, within and without! We need only recognize her, and allow her to continue to move in us and through us, to carry the love and peace of God to all.


    See the obvious red flags?
  • lacrimosa
    Posts: 42
    Thanks for the link to her facebook page. When someone like her is talking about being welcoming to LGBTQ people, do they mean people who have disorders that are challenging but who are striving to live chaste lives, or are they referring also to those who are "practicing" and are involved in immoral behavior and who see this immoral behavior as normal and not sinful?

    She is calling the Holy Spirt "HER"????!!!!

    Have you ever responded to her posts?
    Thanked by 1tomjaw
  • Schönbergian
    Posts: 1,063
    Remember....we need not ask "come, Holy Spirit"

    I imagine the Sequence was not sung at her parish?
  • ServiamScores
    Posts: 2,007
    I chuckled about that too.
  • francis
    Posts: 10,081

    The NO requires music like this. Houses Built on Sand.
  • ServiamScores
    Posts: 2,007
    Well that’s not true… we have nothing of the sort at our masses and haven’t for a long time.
    Thanked by 1Reval
  • Ariasita
    Posts: 26
    When she talks about welcoming LGBTQ people, is she required to make the distinction about which of the two subsets she is being welcoming toward?
  • Ariasita,

    Elaborate, please. I don't understand the question you're asking.
  • Reval
    Posts: 168
    I think Ariasita is referring to this post from Lacrimosa (about the two subsets):

    "When someone like her is talking about being welcoming to LGBTQ people, do they mean people who have disorders that are challenging but who are striving to live chaste lives, or are they referring also to those who are "practicing" and are involved in immoral behavior and who see this immoral behavior as normal and not sinful?"
  • TCJ
    Posts: 856
    I think people who are struggling with certain temptations are unlikely to refer to themselves as LGBTQSIN. Those who do are the ones who want to flaunt it.
  • Reval
    Posts: 168
    Also, the melody reminds me of another melody - I think it's the Kentucky folk version of "Cherry Tree Carol"? especially at the 48 second mark of the video. But then the melody goes up instead of down.

  • lacrimosa
    Posts: 42
    When she talks about welcoming LGBTQ people, is she required to make the distinction about which of the two subsets she is being welcoming toward?


    Yes she should. it is confusing. She could say "adulterers are welcome" but there should be some clarity that adultery is something to turn away from and you are not "welcome" to receive Holy Communion while being a practicing adulterer.

    On her facebook page she advocates welcoming this community. One very misguided fellow posted in response that he looks forward to the day when his gay son walks down the aisle with his gay partner to be married in a Mass setting. Obviously he is confused and people like Sarah Hart are misleading him.
  • Reval,

    I shall hope to hear from Ariasita herself, to discover if your supposition is correct.

    Ariasita,

    (Assuming Reval is correct) Christ welcomed repentant sinners, those who longed to be forgiven, freed of their shackles. Sinners who wished to stay in their sin he could call to repentance, but he didn't welcome them in the same way.

    There is an execrable piece of performance art called All are Welcome, which attempts to blur necessary lines. Since the Good News is available to everyone, everyone is welcome, but we know about the Wedding Garment parable, too, and the story of Dives and Lazarus, and even the separation of the sheep and the goats. Everyone who wishes to accept the offer of salvation on God's terms is welcome to partake of it, but just as only those in the state of Grace are welcomed to received Holy Communion, only those who accept God's offer and His law (not mine!) may enter the Kingdom of Heaven.

    Some people make the mistake of assuming that an excommunication is merely punitive. Telling someone that he is outside the Communion of the Church, and therefore barred from receiving the sacraments which are necessary for the salvation of his soul is a tremendous act of enormous charity.
  • MarkB
    Posts: 865
    The "Welcome" song has exploded among certain Catholic music composers.

    Haugen's "All Are Welcome" was the first, and the song that sparked this thread is a more recent iteration of the genre, but there are plenty more:

    All Are Welcome (All Belong) -- Manibusan
    You Are Welcome Here -- Muglia
    Akwaaba! Welcome -- Walther et alia
    Welcome -- de Silva
    Welcome Home -- Angotti
    Welcome All! -- O'Brien

    Does anyone ever venture into a Catholic church for Mass, wonder whether he's welcome to be there, and after hearing such a song at the gathering entrance breathe a sigh of relief and say, "Oh, thank goodness I'm welcome here; this song proves it."

    I think it's about the silliest sort of song that can be sung at Mass except for an outright secularist song such as we've seen on videos from the Archdiocese of Chicago.
  • TCJ
    Posts: 856
    Can we add "You're Welcome" from Moana?
  • Reval
    Posts: 168
    Since one of the most important parts of the liturgy is the Gathering, then naturally the Welcome song is also very important!
  • Ariasita
    Posts: 26
    So then her language should have clearly stated LGBTQ persons who are turning away from their inclinations and striving to live a chaste life are welcome?
  • MarkB
    Posts: 865
    I think it would be better to avoid the "welcome" slogans, songs, signs, flags, conferences, and language altogether. Let the liturgy be the liturgy, and the Church should evangelize and witness to the truth and life of the Gospel through beautiful liturgy and personal lives of holiness in its members.

    The Church can be and should be authentically welcoming without having to state it a hundred times over. One problem is that the explicit slogans and songs of welcome often are deliberately used to communicate a craftily ambiguous meaning.

    What's next in the devolution? A song titled, "Welcome to Our Inclusive, Affirming, Diverse, Safe Space"?
  • francis
    Posts: 10,081
    Well that’s not true… we have nothing of the sort at our masses and haven’t for a long time.
    Correction... most versions of the NO.

    My version of the NO did not for a long time either, but then I was required.
  • ServiamScores
    Posts: 2,007
    So then her language should have clearly stated LGBTQ persons who are turning away from their inclinations and striving to live a chaste life are welcome?

    Part of the problem is context. Is exceedingly apparent that culture, writ large, is embracing that particular lifestyle without any form of restriction whatsoever… And there are many Christians—and Catholics—who are following suit. Many are openly trying to change church teaching in this regard. So honestly, it would seem that some qualifiers are indeed prudent… someone who is not familiar with Catholic doctrine in any way, shape, or form, could unwittingly come into the church and be unaware that such behavior requires amendment of life. That sounds far-fetched, but the fact of the matter is that people are SO unchurched these days, that even these basic theological positions are no longer a given. There are even “practicing“ Catholics who seem confused about this stuff. (Heck, there are even priests…)
  • lacrimosa
    Posts: 42
    So then her language should have clearly stated LGBTQ persons who are turning away from their inclinations and striving to live a chaste life are welcome?


    Why does this group need to be singled out at all? Many in the LGBTQ community are hysterical over Roe v Wade, so they are not going to be inclined to join their enemy anyway. I have never seen a Catholic Church where there was a sign or a statement that LGBTQ are not welcome or that anyone else was not welcome. We in the Church all know that we are broken people and that the Church is a hospital for sinners. By "welcoming" a group it tends to imply that it's like a club and you can come as you are (and remain that way).

  • francis
    Posts: 10,081
    What about CA people? Are they welcome?
  • Ariasita,

    A hymn acknowledging the sinfulness of everyone would be appropriate. No individual group of persons needs to acknowledged in a "Gathering Song", because (in case this is news) the music is supposed to be part of Mass, which is theocentric.

    "There's a wideness in God's Mercy", assuming it hasn't been already overused, is appropriate to fit the criteria I've set out here.
    Thanked by 2a_f_hawkins LauraKaz
  • ServiamScores
    Posts: 2,007
    I have never seen a Catholic Church where there was a sign or a statement that LGBTQ are not welcome or that anyone else was not welcome.
    Nor have I. And I’ve never felt that I had any more of a claim to the church than anyone else.

    And as to why the one group is being singled out, it is because they are shouting to the rooftops to be noticed. You can’t ignore the rainbow-colored elephant in the corner when it starts shouting at you and parading up and down your streets. I have not noticed similar behavior for other groups of sins. People don’t throw parades for adultery or avarice, but they do strut half naked down the street for sodomy.

  • Ariasita
    Posts: 26
    Chris, I love the hymn ‘There is a Wideness in God’s Mercy’. Simply beautiful text.

    As far as a sign or statement that LGBTQ are not welcome, you all are right in that no such Church has a specific sign indicating this. The feeling of not being welcome comes news media outlets highlighting school employment dismissals, adoption agencies that refuse same sex couples adoptions, and statements the come from the hierarchy. As long as those and like situations continue to occur, an overt not welcome sign is not needed.

    People in the LGBTQ segment of the populations are leaving and have left the Catholic Church with no intent of coming back. They have gone to Lutheran Churches, UCC Churches, and Episcopal Churches. Some have gone to ethical societies while others practice no faith at all. Most, on some level, miss their Catholicity. I see no efforts being made to bring them back, so to speak. Is this right? I don’t know.

    To bring this back to Sacred Music, a lot of ‘fallen away’ members of the community posses pristine sacred music sensibilities and were given musical gifts that would heighten the liturgy yet who would never step foot in a Catholic Church again. Is that fact of interest to the Church? I don’t know.

    Finally, and I know this will be quoted and controversial, but telling the community that acting on their inclinations is immoral will only push them further from the fold. I have never met one person from the LGBTQ community who believes that. No one believes themselves to be intrinsically disordered. Not one.

    Thank you for allowing me to post here. I am not trying to be disagreeable so much as respectfully offering my particular vantage point.
  • lacrimosa
    Posts: 42
    People in the LGBTQ segment of the populations are leaving and have left the Catholic Church with no intent of coming back.
    Probably because they want to find a place where they can be comfortable with their sins. Being a Catholic isn't always easy and requires discipline and self-denial. Many heterosexuals leave for the same reason.
  • ServiamScores
    Posts: 2,007
    Finally, and I know this will be quoted and controversial, but telling the community that acting on their inclinations is immoral will only push them further from the fold.
    That leaves us the option of telling them what, precisely?

    “The building is on fire and about to collapse, but I’m told it’s toasty warm in there, so that’s nice. I support you. You’re welcome to go in there.”
    *eternal death when building collapses*
  • SalieriSalieri
    Posts: 3,134
    Ariasita: I appreciate your honesty, and the vantage point that you present. On the other hand, there are people here on this board who identify as LGBT, or SSA, etc., and who are striving to live according to the precepts of Natural, Divine, and Ecclesiastical Law: should their difficulties and sacrifices be minimized? Without trying to harp on this issue, the Church expects all Catholics to abide by her teachings, and so it isn't as if homosexuals are being singled out any more than gossips or liars are when the Church says that lying and gossiping are sins. Further, the Church doesn't say that homosexuals are intrinsically disordered, it says that homosexual ACTS are intrinsically disordered. There is a big difference here. The act is disordered because it utilizes the sexual faculty in a way for which it isn't intended; the person who experiences these attractions is made in the image and likeness of God, having intrinsic value as a human person, and, if baptized, as a member of the body of Christ. And, for the record, there are heterosexual acts that are intrinsically disordered too, and for the same reason.

    It is unfortunate that the secular culture has made it difficult for the Church to minister to the LGBTQ community by setting up a kind of false dichotomy between accepting people as they are and helping them in their conversion toward Christ. Any sinner (which, by the way, includes every member of the human race except Our Lady, the Immaculate Conception, and Our Lord, the Word Incarnate) must be met where they are, and accompanied, but that accompaniment needs to be toward Christ, and that conversion necessarily entails taking up one's cross, whatever that might be. The purpose of the Church isn't to make nice people, that's what Emily Post is for; the purpose of the Church is the salvation of souls, and that necessarily entails hard work and mortification, and the renunciation of any and all sinful activity, no matter the amount of carnal pleasure may be had.
  • Ariasita
    Posts: 26
    Salieri, much gratitude for your candor. My remarks were, in reflection, generalizations. I apologize to you and anyone on this board offended by them. I wish not to minimize anyone’s sacrifices, should that be what they chose to do. And yes, you are correct that it is the acts that the Church calls disorder, not the condition. My apologies for quoting the Catechism errantly. Please forgive me.
  • ServiamScores
    Posts: 2,007
    To bring this back to Sacred Music, a lot of ‘fallen away’ members of the community posses pristine sacred music sensibilities and were given musical gifts that would heighten the liturgy yet who would never step foot in a Catholic Church again. Is that fact of interest to the Church? I don’t know.
    This is actually an interesting point. It is quite common for music ministers to be of a certain persuasion. This is well known in the music world. Organists appear to be particularly prone to this. With that in mind, I think the church is aware. And many of these ministers simply put on a façade (although many don’t) and just go about their work, saying the right things in public, and then doing whatever they want in private (a habit that extends to nearly every person, in truth). Many have overt blessing from their pastors, I believe. Others carry very heavy burdens, torn between fealty to the church and the very strong cultural currents that always whisper in their ear that it might not be *that* bad.
  • Ariasita
    Posts: 26
    I suppose that begs the question then of whether or not fidelity to the Catholic Church is a requirement for employment in the Church. I know many require it. I would not even begin to hazard a guess either way of what is done in practice. Personally, I know of so many Directors of Music / Organists in the LGBTQ community who have left because the double life was too much for them. Many outside of that community have left as well in an act of solidarity. I have yet to meet one who has remained to contend with their “difficulties, sacrifices, and burdens”. I am sure they are there and perhaps suffer silently. I don’t pretend to know. I do know that this is a reality that is hardly ever talked about.
  • lacrimosa
    Posts: 42
    So I went to Sarah's page and made a post under one of her LGBTQ advocacy posts. It's incredible the number of responses which she gets from people who are very confused, and she is not helping at all, or is perhaps leading them into error. I believe the post I made is reasonable, charitable, and expressed in a way that gives the benefit of the doubt. Do you think she "welcomed" me or my input? I was very soon blocked from her page after making my post, but I made a copy of it in case it would be deleted. Please feel free to let me know if I was wrong to post this or if I was unfair, etc. This is my post to her:

    If we specifically call out "LGBTQ" to welcome, then I think there is a danger of implying that one can practice Catholicism and at the same time be in an illicit relationship. It needs to be made clear that the Church welcomes them and will help them overcome their disordered desires (as well as of those who are heterosexual and are struggling to remain chaste). None of us are welcome to participate fully and receive Holy Communion if we are not in a state of grace, and that would apply to anyone who has a sexual relationship who falls under "LGBTQ." And of course that also applies to heterosexuals who fornicate, commit adultery, or use contraception, etc. All are welcome, but on God's terms which are not necessarily terms that are comfortable or that we like. As someone who hears your music in my church, it would be a great relief to see you clarify that you are not advocating that sexual sins be condoned, but that you are primarily welcoming the LGBTQ people to come and see what our Church is about, and if they wish to practice the faith, they need to turn their backs on their sins, as must everyone else with their sexual sins, improper relationships, non-sexual sins, etc. Of course they might still have inclinations and desires, as do heterosexual people, but they can be dominated by prayer and reception of the sacraments. Thank you.
  • MarkB
    Posts: 865
    Want more evidence of corruption and doctrinal dissent among OCP's artists? Research Greg Walton.

    He's a composer for OCP:
    https://ocp.org/en-us/artists/62775/greg-walton

    Here's his Facebook page. He's an ardent advocate of transgender ideology:
    https://www.facebook.com/gregwaltonmusic

    He has a one-track mind. Browse his Facebook page and see what I mean.

    Why are these people writing music for Catholic worship? Why are they being published by a company with close ties to the Archdiocese of Portland? Why are they doing ministry by giving diocesan workshops, influencing other music ministers and priests?

    Why is anyone supporting those composers by using their music?

    Because the Church is a mess. There's a lot that needs to be straightened out.

    OCP is corrupt, is hurting the Church and the liturgical renewal with the music it publishes for use at Mass, and hides a lot about its composers. I am resolved never to purchase anything from that company again.
  • Ariasita,

    Your line of reasoning reminds me of one my mother put forward when a movie came out about Allan Turing and Enigma. She said (partly echoing the movie) that it was a shame to destroy some one who had helped to defeat the Nazis, and all because of whom he loved.

    The Church's teaching on morality is binding on all of us. It doesn't matter which part of the moral law we struggle to fulfill. Imagine if someone were to come on this forum (I can imagine who among the regulars might do this just to illustrate the point) to say that he wanted the Church to give up teaching that workers had to be paid a just wage. He wanted to be rich, and if that meant defrauding the workers or their rightful earnings, it was horridly judgmental of the Church to try to condemn him, rather than accompany him and welcome him. And what if that same tycoon insisted on a month celebrating avarice and gluttony? And what if someone argued that the wealthy needed not to be turned away from the Church by being made to feel as if they were committing a sin which cried out to heaven for vengeance?

  • ServiamScores
    Posts: 2,007
    The Church's teaching on morality is binding on all of us. It doesn't matter which part of the moral law we struggle to fulfill.
    This is precisely what has always bothered me about the whole issue. To be very vulnerable here for a moment: even though I am a straight, married man, the truth is I also cannot engage in hookup culture, sodomy (even with my wife), look at porn, visit strip clubs, pleasure myself, etc, etc, etc. Fallen human nature being way it is, I certainly understand the appeal… but I am held to exactly the same standard to which the Church asks all souls to adhere, including all single people, regardless of persuasion. The difference is, I was not called to celibacy, which, arguably, people with same sex attraction are. This is a heavy burden to bear, to be sure, especially if it is undesired. I had my own rocky path to navigate to chastity in my youth, so I know the struggle intimately. I suspect many of you can attest to the same. I had to refrain from communion on many occasions when I was younger, and I certainly had to learn to “deny myself, and pick up my cross, and follow Him.” It is helping people do this last thing: overcome vice and grow in virtue, which we are called fo accompany. What a horrible disservice to me it would have been if everyone told me that, “actually, it’s ok to contracept and look at porn. The Church needs to change Her teaching, because we understand our sexuality better now than they ever did in the past.” (This last idea is a lie, of course.)
  • Anna_BendiksenAnna_Bendiksen
    Posts: 128
    I think we ought to be praying for her (not that the public criticism is wrong; it isn't). The writing of hymn texts is a spiritually dangerous business even when they are declared to be orthodox. When they are heretical, well... I've long thought that heresy is out for blood; it wants, craves, human victims. We ought to be praying for her.
  • Anna,

    Did she intend the text to be sung at Mass, or merely desire to express herself?
  • Anna_BendiksenAnna_Bendiksen
    Posts: 128
    That I don't know.
  • MatthewRoth
    Posts: 1,773
    "Is that fact of interest to the Church? I don’t know. "

    Yes, and I've been a member of parishes where this became a problem. The musicians were not interrogated about their "personal lives" or their politics, but if not advertising things contrary to church teaching and the natural law was a problem for the musician in question, then they weren't welcome to sing, and musicians left over that. It was a huge loss, almost incalculable. But this stuff is non-negotiable, and ignoring it only makes the fracture worse. Fidelity to church teaching should be a requirement, and if people don't like it, then they're free to leave.

    "Finally, and I know this will be quoted and controversial, but telling the community that acting on their inclinations is immoral will only push them further from the fold. I have never met one person from the LGBTQ community who believes that. No one believes themselves to be intrinsically disordered. Not one."

    Because that's not the teaching. Homosexual attractions and desires are intrinsically disordered. The person is not intrinsically disordered, although wounded by original sin, yet baptismal grace brings the correction, so to speak so that we do not live in a disordered way when we are born again as the new man in Christ.

    Re: pushing people from the fold, our pastor preached this morning on the consecrated life, which of course means talking about the rich young man who went away sad. Was Christ not supposed to proclaim the evangelical counsels and not invite us to follow him?

    Re: OCP: the diocese doesn't have enough control, and they apparently don't exercise much internally either; this was proven by doubling down on the use of an image of a Mormon fallenangel a few years ago.
  • MarkB
    Posts: 865
    OCP is recommending her song be sung at Mass on the 16th Sunday in Ordinary Time at the "Presentation and Preparation of the Gifts":
    https://www.ocp.org/en-us/blog/entry/16th-sunday-in-ordinary-time-year-c-jul-17-2022

    They intend these questionable, harmful songs to be sung at Mass, even if they say with a wink and their fingers crossed that their hymnals contain lots of music for use at different types of gatherings, devotions and liturgies, so not every song in Breaking Bread is intended for use at Mass.

    And I guarantee you a significant number of OCP subscribers will program her song in just that place because OCP told them that's how they should stack their hymn sandwich that weekend.
  • Ariasita
    Posts: 26
    The catechism states that homosexual acts are contrary to natural law. Is it the Church that is the decider of which laws are natural and which are not? If a new law in quantum mechanics comes forth, is the Church to make a declaration of its being natural or unnatural?

    And on a musical note, if the song is as offensive as it has been portrayed, everyone has the prerogative not to program it. Simply that. Other church will do as they will, and for all our discussion, nothing will change that. Is the playing of that song an intrinsically disordered act?

    I ask these questions respectfully, as I know all of you are learned individuals who do not mind the mere act of questioning.
    Thanked by 1CHGiffen
  • francis
    Posts: 10,081
    No one is supposed to chose other texts for the mass. The texts can be chanted or sung polyphonically and/ or with organ.
    Thanked by 1Ariasita
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