Song of Farewell Chant
  • PhilipPowellPhilipPowell
    Posts: 53
    I am looking for chant settings of the Song of Farewell which I know my parish has used in the past but I can't find it anywhere. Thanks in advance.

    Philip
  • MarkB
    Posts: 858
    Perhaps the last page of Fr. Weber's chants here?

    Or Adam Bartlett's chants here?

    Thanked by 1PhilipPowell
  • rich_enough
    Posts: 941
    Theodore Marier has also written a nice chant version (see attached).
  • It's also called In Paradisum.
  • GerardH
    Posts: 290
    It's also called In Paradisum.

    Actually it's the Subvenite or another responsory from a list of about 8 options, sung in the position traditionally held by the Libera me.

    Bugnini's Requiem is in many ways a travesty
  • Gerhard,

    Why would someone sing the Subvenite in the place where the Libera me belongs?
  • ServiamScores
    Posts: 1,890
    Here is my transcription of the original In Paradisum into simplified, stemless modern notation, as well as a transcription of the original chant into english using the translation from the Parish Book of Chant. Free to use and share.
    https://psallitedomino.com/blog/free-transcription-in-paradisum

    I have been in the habit of singing it in english, and then repeating the original at our Novus Ordo parish. I've had multiple parishioners tell me how much they like this chant and how peaceful they find it—with one emphatically stating he wants it at his funeral. This was such an interesting response to me because this was something the parish had not heard in decades and yet they responded to it immediately. It's almost as if... Holy Mother Church has some ancient and perennial wisdom that transcends time or something...
  • PhilipPowellPhilipPowell
    Posts: 53
    It's also called In Paradisum

    From what I've always been told, this essentially acts as the recessional as the body makes it's way to the burial while the Song of Farewell is sung while the remains are incensed.
    Thanked by 1Paul F. Ford
  • PhilipPowellPhilipPowell
    Posts: 53
    Or Adam Bartlett's chants here?


    Ah, this is what we've done in the past! Thanks! (The Weber looks nice too though.)
  • rich_enough
    Posts: 941
    Why would someone sing the Subvenite in the place where the Libera me belongs?

    In the new rite, the Subvenite has been moved from the entrance into the Church to the Final Commendation at the end of Mass. the Libera Me is not found in the 1974 Graduale Romanum; evidently it is no longer part of the funeral liturgy.
  • Rich enough,
    In the new rite, the Subvenite has been moved from the entrance into the Church to the Final Commendation at the end of Mass. the Libera Me is not found in the 1974 Graduale Romanum; evidently it is no longer part of the funeral liturgy.

    What further need have we of witnesses?
  • a_f_hawkins
    Posts: 3,088
    The Libera me is on p.696 of GR, still (as an option) for the Final Commendation and Farewell, there is in GR a choice among 6 responsaries at this point. The Subvenite may still be used at the entrance of the corpse 'for pastoral reasons'.
    [EDIT]As pointed out below, this is a different text (and melody) from elsewhere in the Office for the Dead. Libera ... de viis inferni ... not Libera ... de morte aeterna ...
    I do not recall that many layfolk had a Solemn Requiem prior to 1969. Had it been common Mrs Kennedy might have chosen it for her son, but she wanted a 'normal parish Low Mass'.
    Thanked by 1tomjaw
  • Andrew_Malton
    Posts: 1,072
    Where does the title “Song of Farewell” come from? I've never heard of before, and I can't find it in any of my books in Latin or English.
    Thanked by 1tomjaw
  • dhalkjdhalkj
    Posts: 59
    I see the title "Song of Farewell" in CBWIII right before 10A, B and C. 10A is I know my Redeemer lives, 10B is Saints of God, come to his/her aid, 10C is May songs of the angels welcome you.
    The title is found in the Canadian English Order of Christian Funerals 2016 as part of the Final Commendation immediately following the "Signs of Farewell" (sprinkling and incensing) and option A is I know that my Redeemer lives and option B Saints of God, come to his aid, which appears to be a straightforward translation of Subvenite Sancti Dei,
    Thanked by 1Andrew_Malton
  • PaxTecum
    Posts: 257
    I second Fr. Weber's Saints of God - based on the Subvenite. I use it often.
  • a_f_hawkins
    Posts: 3,088
    The title in GR is Ad ultimam Commendationem et Valedictionem. I guess 'farewell' is a fair translation,
    The 1990 Order of Christian Funerals probably uses it - the CBCEW guidance to musicians includes :
    ...
    Lamb of God (§ 153)
    COMMUNION SONG (§153)
    Invitation to Prayer --- Final Commendation
    Silence
    [Signs of Farewell]
    SONG OF FAREWELL (§156)
    Prayer of Commendation
    Psalms -- Procession to place of Committal
  • francis
    Posts: 10,032
    In the new rite
    key give away
    Thanked by 1tomjaw
  • MatthewRoth
    Posts: 1,773
    That's a different Libera me, the one assigned to the traditional Matins of the dead if only the third nocturn is sung. The Libera me, which begins "Libera Me, Domine, de morte aeterna" is excluded from the reformed Roman liturgy. Now, I'm sure the chant provided is very nice, but it's not what I want.
  • GerardH
    Posts: 290
    The Libera me is on p.696 of GR, still (as an option) for the Final Commendation and Farewell

    That's a different Libera me... The Libera me, which begins "Libera Me, Domine, de morte aeterna" is excluded from the reformed Roman liturgy.

    All that being said, I'm fairly certain (I don't own a copy to confirm) the rubrics at that point in the liturgy say something along the lines of "one of the following, or another suitable song".

    Who's to judge that Libera me ... de morte is unsuitable as an alternative?
    Thanked by 3tomjaw chonak PaxTecum
  • PaxTecum
    Posts: 257
    certainly not me, who am i to judge?
  • francis
    Posts: 10,032
    “another suitable song"

    Oh ... you have got to simply love and give thanks to the almighty above for that all pervasive and endlessly destructive (oops,,, I meant creative!) three little word rubric. I am so glad we have this. With it we can program anything, anywhere at any time! We can legally suspend anything legal or illegal to our personal satisfaction. How absolutely clever is THAT!?

    SVVLBHCOM
  • ServiamScores
    Posts: 1,890
    I am so glad we have this. With it we can program anything, anywhere at any time!
    Bugnini's famous quote about weaponized ambiguity and "knowing beforehand how we would interpret the documents afterwards" comes to mind...
  • SVVLBHCOM


    ?
    Thanked by 1Carol
  • francis
    Posts: 10,032
    ?

    Smirking Very Very Loudly Behind Hand Cupped Over Mouth
    Thanked by 1Carol
  • a_f_hawkins
    Posts: 3,088
    "another suitable song," is NOT a simple three word rubric, even in this mistranslation into English it has an attached definition of suitability. In Latin it says "another chant/song which is suited to ... , and ..."
    However the bishops, particularly in the USA, flagrantly disregarded the spirit of the rubric, which gives them an explicit responsibility for the text of the song/chant.
  • francis
    Posts: 10,032
    a_f_... this surely seems to be a gaping loophole that was put into place so many could take liberties. however, if you truly think differently, can you give us the entire proper English translation of the Latin so we can truly see what it says? your statement above, in my mind, does not justify the continued abuse of liturgical norms. perhaps you have better explanation?
  • MarkB
    Posts: 858
    Yes, "suitable" is the operative word. I believe the Latin original is "alius cantus aptus." Aptus is the operative word and cannot be construed to mean merely "another desired song."

    Consider these lyrics from a song that OCP is touting on its website today as a song of farewell, which is assuredly not "suitable/aptus." The lyrics implicitly canonize the deceased:

    Go in peace, God be with you
    Go in peace, be at rest
    With the saints and the angels.
    Now you are free.
    Go in peace.

    See, the Father is waiting
    With a robe of white, purest white.
    Go and feast at his table
    With the bread of life, bread of life
    Lift your heart, rejoice and sing for you are home;
    Home at last and forever in the arms of the holy one.


    Many theological and doctrinal problems with this text. As I said, it implicitly canonizes the deceased, which departs from what the Mass of Christian burial prays for. It also refers to feasting on the bread of life in heaven, but in heaven there are no sacraments because the Beatific Vision makes sacraments superfluous.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hKWJEUx40eA

    When the publishers are pushing unsuitable music, it's time to call them out.
  • francis
    Posts: 10,032
    Mark

    Who decides if anything is “suitable” or not?

    The word “suitable” is entirely subjective in meaning. What you perceive as “suitable” I may perceive as illicit. If it’s being published in a Catholic hymnal wouldnt one suppose it’s already approved?
  • a_f_hawkins
    Posts: 3,088
    francis, surely nothing can justify the abuse of liturgical norms.
    48. Peragitur autem a schola et populo alternatim, vel simili modo a cantore et populo, vel totus a populo vel a schola sola. Adhiberi potest sive antiphona cum suo psalmo in Graduali romano vel in Graduali simplici exstans, sive alius cantus, actioni sacræ, diei vel temporis indoli congruus,55 cuius textus a Conferentia Episcoporum sit approbatus.

    48.This chant is sung alternately by the choir and the people or similarly by a cantor and the people, or entirely by the people, or by the choir alone. In the dioceses of England and Wales the Entrance Chant may be chosen from among the following: the antiphon with its Psalm from the Graduale Romanum or the Graduale Simplex, or another chant that is suited to the sacred action, the day, or the time of year,55 and whose text has been approved by the Conference of Bishops of England and Wales.
    The text is still not perfectly clear, since the punctuation of the Latin shows that it both suited to the action (eg an offertory procession) and adapted to the character of the day or the season (a green Sunday, or your solemnity of title).
  • ServiamScores
    Posts: 1,890
    Many theological and doctrinal problems with this text.

    You can say that again!

    Also, “spirit of the rubric” made me chuckle. [for the record, I understand what you mean and think it an appropriate phrase]

    We have so many spirits floating around the church, it’s a wonder our buildings are still attached to the ground!
  • ServiamScores
    Posts: 1,890
    Who decides if anything is “suitable” or not?
    There’s a reason imprimaturs used to be a thing, and the rubrics do mention “approved by the local ordinary or conference of bishops”, so technically, they should decide, although arguably it’s probably a good thing they are as impotent as they are these days… what little they do agree on tends to be pretty vapid, God bless them.
  • francis
    Posts: 10,032
    The text is still not perfectly clear
    Well, to me it’s as clear as mud in a clay pot floating in a pit of molten lava somewhere on a moon circling Saturn being blown into space by pressures still not identified by science. Hence the term, nebula, otherwise known as “star nurseries”.
    Thanked by 1ServiamScores
  • Liam
    Posts: 4,648
    Well, back in 2006 (early in B16's pontificate) the US bishops decided that if there was going to be a decider it would be the ordinary of the jurisdiction of publication, which meant the Abp of Chicago (GIA and, formerly, WLP), the Abp of Portland in Oregon (OCP), and the Bishop of St Cloud (Liturgical Press) were given the lion's share of authority in practical effect, and Rome never got back to them on that.