Song of Farewell Chant
  • PhilipPowellPhilipPowell
    Posts: 45
    I am looking for chant settings of the Song of Farewell which I know my parish has used in the past but I can't find it anywhere. Thanks in advance.

    Philip
  • MarkB
    Posts: 810
    Perhaps the last page of Fr. Weber's chants here?

    Or Adam Bartlett's chants here?

    Thanked by 1PhilipPowell
  • rich_enough
    Posts: 916
    Theodore Marier has also written a nice chant version (see attached).
  • It's also called In Paradisum.
  • GerardH
    Posts: 278
    It's also called In Paradisum.

    Actually it's the Subvenite or another responsory from a list of about 8 options, sung in the position traditionally held by the Libera me.

    Bugnini's Requiem is in many ways a travesty
  • Gerhard,

    Why would someone sing the Subvenite in the place where the Libera me belongs?
  • ServiamScores
    Posts: 1,618
    Here is my transcription of the original In Paradisum into simplified, stemless modern notation, as well as a transcription of the original chant into english using the translation from the Parish Book of Chant. Free to use and share.
    https://psallitedomino.com/blog/free-transcription-in-paradisum

    I have been in the habit of singing it in english, and then repeating the original at our Novus Ordo parish. I've had multiple parishioners tell me how much they like this chant and how peaceful they find it—with one emphatically stating he wants it at his funeral. This was such an interesting response to me because this was something the parish had not heard in decades and yet they responded to it immediately. It's almost as if... Holy Mother Church has some ancient and perennial wisdom that transcends time or something...
  • PhilipPowellPhilipPowell
    Posts: 45
    It's also called In Paradisum

    From what I've always been told, this essentially acts as the recessional as the body makes it's way to the burial while the Song of Farewell is sung while the remains are incensed.
    Thanked by 1Paul F. Ford
  • PhilipPowellPhilipPowell
    Posts: 45
    Or Adam Bartlett's chants here?


    Ah, this is what we've done in the past! Thanks! (The Weber looks nice too though.)
  • rich_enough
    Posts: 916
    Why would someone sing the Subvenite in the place where the Libera me belongs?

    In the new rite, the Subvenite has been moved from the entrance into the Church to the Final Commendation at the end of Mass. the Libera Me is not found in the 1974 Graduale Romanum; evidently it is no longer part of the funeral liturgy.
  • Rich enough,
    In the new rite, the Subvenite has been moved from the entrance into the Church to the Final Commendation at the end of Mass. the Libera Me is not found in the 1974 Graduale Romanum; evidently it is no longer part of the funeral liturgy.

    What further need have we of witnesses?
  • a_f_hawkins
    Posts: 3,005
    The Libera me is on p.696 of GR, still (as an option) for the Final Commendation and Farewell, there is in GR a choice among 6 responsaries at this point. The Subvenite may still be used at the entrance of the corpse 'for pastoral reasons'.
    [EDIT]As pointed out below, this is a different text (and melody) from elsewhere in the Office for the Dead. Libera ... de viis inferni ... not Libera ... de morte aeterna ...
    I do not recall that many layfolk had a Solemn Requiem prior to 1969. Had it been common Mrs Kennedy might have chosen it for her son, but she wanted a 'normal parish Low Mass'.
    Thanked by 1tomjaw
  • Andrew_Malton
    Posts: 1,052
    Where does the title “Song of Farewell” come from? I've never heard of before, and I can't find it in any of my books in Latin or English.
    Thanked by 1tomjaw
  • dhalkjdhalkj
    Posts: 59
    I see the title "Song of Farewell" in CBWIII right before 10A, B and C. 10A is I know my Redeemer lives, 10B is Saints of God, come to his/her aid, 10C is May songs of the angels welcome you.
    The title is found in the Canadian English Order of Christian Funerals 2016 as part of the Final Commendation immediately following the "Signs of Farewell" (sprinkling and incensing) and option A is I know that my Redeemer lives and option B Saints of God, come to his aid, which appears to be a straightforward translation of Subvenite Sancti Dei,
    Thanked by 1Andrew_Malton
  • PaxTecum
    Posts: 254
    I second Fr. Weber's Saints of God - based on the Subvenite. I use it often.
  • a_f_hawkins
    Posts: 3,005
    The title in GR is Ad ultimam Commendationem et Valedictionem. I guess 'farewell' is a fair translation,
    The 1990 Order of Christian Funerals probably uses it - the CBCEW guidance to musicians includes :
    ...
    Lamb of God (§ 153)
    COMMUNION SONG (§153)
    Invitation to Prayer --- Final Commendation
    Silence
    [Signs of Farewell]
    SONG OF FAREWELL (§156)
    Prayer of Commendation
    Psalms -- Procession to place of Committal
  • francisfrancis
    Posts: 9,805
    In the new rite
    key give away
    Thanked by 1tomjaw
  • MatthewRoth
    Posts: 1,584
    That's a different Libera me, the one assigned to the traditional Matins of the dead if only the third nocturn is sung. The Libera me, which begins "Libera Me, Domine, de morte aeterna" is excluded from the reformed Roman liturgy. Now, I'm sure the chant provided is very nice, but it's not what I want.
  • GerardH
    Posts: 278
    The Libera me is on p.696 of GR, still (as an option) for the Final Commendation and Farewell

    That's a different Libera me... The Libera me, which begins "Libera Me, Domine, de morte aeterna" is excluded from the reformed Roman liturgy.

    All that being said, I'm fairly certain (I don't own a copy to confirm) the rubrics at that point in the liturgy say something along the lines of "one of the following, or another suitable song".

    Who's to judge that Libera me ... de morte is unsuitable as an alternative?
    Thanked by 3tomjaw chonak PaxTecum
  • PaxTecum
    Posts: 254
    certainly not me, who am i to judge?