How far does a ♭ extend?
  • Geremia
    Posts: 201
    The 1961 Liber Usualis (PDF) "Rules for Interpretation" p. xviij:
    The Flat.
    In the Vatican Edition the Flat holds good: a) for a whole word; b) as far as the first bar line — even quarter-bar — which occurs after it. The Ta returns to its natural state with a new word, after any bar-line and, of course, whenever a natural (♮) is placed before it. In a few pieces the Flat is placed near the Clef on each section of the stave; it then makes flat every Te or B in the piece unless contradicted by a natural.
    So basically a ♭ extends at least to the end of the word but no farther than any bar-line?

    The seemingly redundant ♭ symbols in the 1ˢᵗ line of the Alleluia for the 2ⁿᵈ Sunday of Advent
    image
    confused me, because I thought the ♭ symbol extended no farther than to the end of a word.

    The penultimate and last lines of the original scan also show two ♭ symbols for one word (íbimus), so it seems a line break also resets a ♭.

    Are there any examples of
    1. a single ♭ symbol extending across more than one word?
    2. a ♭ resetting with a ♮ before the end of a word?
    3. multiple ♭ or ♮ symbols in one word (on the same line and separated by no bar-lines)?
  • Drake
    Posts: 175
    In the first line, the flat would be canceled by the quarter bar (in fact, by any bar). That is why the flat must be written a second time just after the quarter bar.

    In my chant tutorial, I use the tract Beatus Vir because it has a very wide variety of chant elements, including changes from flat to natural within a word. Strictly speaking, the naturals shown in the piece aren't necessary because of the quarter bar coming just before them, but I assume they are written in to make it more obvious. There are, however, examples of both Ti and Te in the same word within this tract. I elaborate a bit on this in the "Flat" tab within the tutorial.
  • Are there any examples of a ♭ resetting at the end of a word but before a bar-line?
    Sure. The Communion Dum venerit for the fourth Sunday after Easter is one of them.
  • I assume that when a flat symbol occurs at the very beginning of each line, as in the attached file,then a natural would apply to the end of the word or the next bar, whichever came first.
    Does anyone know of an example where that happens?
    1329 x 2093 - 641K
  • No; it's like a key signature. Refer to the end of the passage from the Rules for Interpretation quoted in the OP. I know of no example with the flat printed at the beginning of every line where there is also a B-natural anywhere in the chant.
    Thanked by 2ServiamScores tomjaw
  • FKulash,

    The Festal Tone of the Ave Regina Caelorum has this same phenomenon.

    As to the naturalized b-flat.... I'll have to think about that.
  • Geremia
    Posts: 201
    @madorganist:
    Are there any examples of a ♭ resetting at the end of a word but before a bar-line?
    Sure. The Communion
    Dum venerit for the fourth Sunday after Easter is one of them.

    image

    How do you know it resets at the end of the word vénerit? The porrectus in Paráclitus contains a Ti or a Te?
  • How do you know it resets at the end of the word vénerit?
    Because that's the rule. If you doubt it, compare the modern notation editions—or Montpellier H 159, Graz/Klosterneuburg 807, Zwettl 196, etc.
    The porrectus in Paráclitus contains a Ti or a Te?
    Ti!
    Thanked by 2tomjaw CCooze
  • How do you know it resets at the end of the word vénerit?

    The word is done, and according to traditional praxis, "Dum venerit" would be intoned by a cantor, and then the rest of the choir would join in at "paraclitus", so there is both a shift of word and a dramatic shift from cantor to schola.
  • If I didn’t know any better by looking at the music, the 3rd note of the “ra” in Paraclitus maintains the flat and is not reset after the intonation, this would be otherwise if there was a quarter bar after the Dum venerit.
  • If I didn’t know any better
    Fortunately, if you have read the Rules for Interpretation or the preface to the Vatican edition, you do know better!
  • Geremia
    Posts: 201
    Because that's the rule.
    Ah, because "The Ta returns to its natural state with a new word".

    So, a ♭ extends at least to the end of the word but no farther than any bar-line, whichever comes first.
    Thanked by 1tomjaw
  • francisfrancis
    Posts: 9,665
    if you use logic in analyzing the melodic line, you can also surmise that the appoggiaturas ascend and descend from the TI and TE in proper order... (leaving a TI to DO, leaving a TE to LA)... this is a common usage in the treatment of a TI or TE in chant.
  • So, a ♭ extends at least to the end of the word but no farther than any bar-line, whichever comes first.
    Exactly. The Preface to the Vatican Edition says the following:
    It is to be noted that B-flat, when it occurs, only holds good as far as the next natural, or dividing line, or new word.
  • Geremia
    Posts: 201
    Are there any examples of
    1. a single ♭ symbol extending across more than one word?
    2. a ♭ resetting with a ♮ before the end of a word?
    3. multiple ♭ or ♮ symbols in one word (on the same line and separated by no bar-lines)?
    #2 & #3 are illustrated by "veritáte" or "Dómine" in the gradual for the 4th Sunday of Advent:
    image