Christ has no body now but yours
  • Don9of11Don9of11
    Posts: 163
    I have read some blogs about this piece of music, the text, (which appears in our Gather hymnals) as to whether it was really written by St. Teresa of Alvia. Some give high praise to this song and I have listened to several renditions on youTube. As a cantor I will be introducing this to our congregation next week and I have to tell you it's unsettling to me to say Christ has no body.

    If he has no body, who was it that rose from the dead? And St. Paul says we are members of the body of Jesus Christ (Rom 12-4) This song seems to contradict the real presence. If this is such a good number why don't we sing it on Easter Sunday? How does this text help evangelize Catholics who will undoubtedly go home and repeat these words over and over again?

    Maybe I am missing something, I'm not a mystic and the congregation certainly isn't. As musicians and ministers of the word of God don't we have a responsibility to be conscious of the text we use? I'm confused.




  • I wouldn't sing it or select it for congregational singing. I agree that the title denies the Real Presence of our Lord in the Eucharist. One need not go any further, like looking for justification in a saint's writings, to disqualify its selection for singing at Mass. We can do much better.
    Thanked by 3francis Don9of11 Kathy
  • fcbfcb
    Posts: 250
    There is no evidence that Theresa ever said this. And thanks be to God for that, because it not only denies the real presence, but also the Ascension. It's pretty Pelagian as well. Avoid this text like the plague. (Of course people often like it, because it seems to be saying, "take your faith seriously and get out there and do something"-- which is a nice sentiment.)
  • francisfrancis
    Posts: 7,873
    WE are the body of Christ... who needs the real one?!
  • Kathy
    Posts: 4,946
    It's both, I think. We have real responsibilities for the life of the Church. But only because He lives and lives in us. "Remain in me," He said, "for apart from Me you can do nothing.
  • CharlesW
    Posts: 9,285
    If I am the only body Christ has, He's in deep doo-doo.
    Thanked by 1Ryan Murphy
  • francisfrancis
    Posts: 7,873
    Kathy:

    You are right. Therefore, the title "Christ Has No Body But Yours" is heresy.
    Thanked by 1Ryan Murphy
  • chonakchonak
    Posts: 7,280
    Naive people seem to fall for anything with the name Teresa on it. If they're not attributing some sentimental bilge to Therese of Lisieux, they're pinning it on Teresa of Avila or Mother Teresa of Calcutta.

    A few years ago I blogged about this fake quotation, and referred readers to a nun's blog which told how she asked the Institute of Carmelite studies about it, and they told her it was definitely not a real quote from the saint's writings or from the oral traditions about her. Alas, the nun's page is no longer on the net.

    One reader posted a comment on my blog to attribute the words to French priest Michel Quoist, ostensibly writing about the priest who acts _in persona Christi_.
    Thanked by 1Continuousbass
  • Adam WoodAdam Wood
    Posts: 6,281
    Naive people seem to fall for anything with the name Teresa on it. If they're not attributing some sentimental bilge to Therese of Lisieux, they're pinning it on Teresa of Avila or Mother Teresa of Calcutta.


    And Francis of Assisi.
  • ryandryand
    Posts: 1,528
    Throw out a quote and tag a famous name at the end, and fools will take it as fact.

    image
  • Best. Quote. Ever.

    Lol
  • Adam WoodAdam Wood
    Posts: 6,281
    It's supposed to be:
    Use the Force, harry. - Gandalf.
  • G
    Posts: 1,381
    I attended a presentation by a rather well-known priest-musicologist, (quoted here, from time to time,) and when he said "ever since the Ascension Christ has no body here but yours and mine," I turned to our associate pastor who was attending as well and whispered, "What about the Real Presence
    He waved his hand dismissively and so, "Oh, that...."
    I began to wonder if we fulfilled our obligation when he had Mass.

    I don't know that particular song, so I don't know if the heretical implications of the title are mitigated later in the text, but I would not sing it.

    (Save the Liturgy, Save the World)
    Thanked by 1Ryan Murphy
  • Liam
    Posts: 3,419
    I see you and raise you. I remember a parish committee meeting where one of the members opined that after the Ascension, Christ could come back as a woman. Now the glorified body is not the same as the mortal body, and the Catholic church does not teach that *souls* are sexed, but you should have seen the look on this guy's face when I explained the resurrection of the body as a basic Christian belief that progressives should especially champion, et cet.
  • Don9of11Don9of11
    Posts: 163
    Since I may not have much to say about it's use in our church, apart from my refusing to sing it (which probably won't accomplish anything), I can only hope that when others hear it and read the text that this matter will attend to itself. Thanks for all your comments, but I don't think the force is strong enough Mr. Data :)
  • Dave
    Posts: 64
    What would Delores Dufner, OSB, or Tom Conry think?
  • melofluentmelofluent
    Posts: 4,159
    Tom Conry

    Who? ;-)
    Actually, I have very vivid memories of quite a few encounters with Tom, including accompanying at 79 NPM and one LAREC. At the LAREC, he held the distinction of being the first RC musician to my knowledge to employ a guitar synthesizer, a very weird and huge dulcimer looking thing just prototyped by Yamaha.
    Thanked by 1Dave
  • Don9of11Don9of11
    Posts: 163
    At cantor practice tonight our music director decided to scrub this selection (after further reflection) and will sing instead Adoramus Te Christe by Th. Dubois. God is good!
    Thanked by 1MatthewRoth
  • francisfrancis
    Posts: 7,873
    wow... talk about a 180!
  • chonakchonak
    Posts: 7,280
    I may have come closer to finding a source for this dodgy hymn text finally. It seems to have been published in the 1975 novel "The Fifth Gospel" by Italian writer Mario Pomilio. For all I know, he may have invented it himself.
    Thanked by 1eft94530
  • francisfrancis
    Posts: 7,873
    lol. tnx chonak.