Font for a funeral program
  • rogue63
    Posts: 410
    My boss has requested that I make a tri-fold template for programs for funerals. Can anyone recommend a font available in Word 2010? I'm not a graphic designer.
  • Liam
    Posts: 4,393
    Use Garamond. It's a time-tested good font. Font geeks can make tons of wonderful recommendations of equal or better (I love Baskerville, which is in the 2010 pack, for example, but some people find it old-fashioned - it's a more open font than some other standards), but Garamond has been a go-to for many professional designers I've worked with in editorial contexts.

    Avoid Times fonts: however standard they are, they were designed to save space for newsprint without consideration of compassion on the human eye.

    Garamond doesn't use too much space but is easier on the eye on a printed page (it's harder on the eye when viewed on a screen - screen and print are different uses for considering fonts).

    Thanked by 1JulieColl
  • Kathy
    Posts: 5,368
    My template wasn't beautiful or I'd send it over. PM me if you get desperate, though!
  • Kathy
    Posts: 5,368
    And I agree with Liam about Garamond.
  • Adam WoodAdam Wood
    Posts: 6,412
    Garamond is the font of every blessing.
    Thanked by 2ryand BruceL
  • matthewjmatthewj
    Posts: 2,669
    Chiller.
    Thanked by 2Adam Wood benstox
  • WJA
    Posts: 237
    If you want something a bit more formal than Garamond, I'd recommend Palatino.
    Thanked by 1CHGiffen
  • chonakchonak
    Posts: 8,737
    What Liam said.

    But whatever you choose, stick to one font family: use bold, use italic, use small caps, but all from the same family.
  • CHGiffenCHGiffen
    Posts: 4,744
    While I think most highly of Garamond, I have a real affinity for Palatino Linotype.
    Thanked by 1chonak
  • melofluentmelofluent
    Posts: 4,160
    Mat-tieux
    You're truly a bad boy.
    I'm partial to "Californian."
    Duh
  • Liam
    Posts: 4,393
    Palatino just tends to use more space than Garamond, so for templates of this sort with space limits, I'd stick with Garamond.
  • Liam
    Posts: 4,393
    The only font I ever purchased was ITC Golden Cockerel. Lovely symbol and title fonts....

    Sorry, been a font geek wannabe (my younger brother is way more knowledgeable than I am) since the mid-1980s when I got to redesign my law review into Baskerville and then one of my clients early in my career was Bitstream.

    Anyway, two quick passes that can help initially orient someone new to the world of fonts:

    http://bestdesignoptions.com/?p=733

    http://bestdesignoptions.com/?p=722
  • jpal
    Posts: 365
    I use Linux Libertine for everything. As chonak says, variations with size, bold, small caps, increased kerning, etc. I change it to one of those already mentioned if I'm sending it to someone else.
  • jpal
    Posts: 365
    Just don't use Comic sans, whatever you do...
    Thanked by 1ZacPB189
  • irishtenoririshtenor
    Posts: 1,225
    I use Palatino.
  • Adam WoodAdam Wood
    Posts: 6,412
    Linux Libertine

    I might have to change my "political orientation" on Facebook...
    Thanked by 2jpal ryand
  • chonakchonak
    Posts: 8,737
    There are quite a few enjoyable fonts these days; for open source fans, besides Linux Libertine, there is also Gentium, produced by the Summer Institute of Linguistics (which trains Wycliffe scripture-translation missionaries).
    Thanked by 1Aristotle Esguerra
  • rogue63
    Posts: 410
    My goodness! Thanks for the help, all of you. I've never quite understood the world of fonts, but it seems to make a great deal of difference to many people. I appreciate the gentle suggestions and generous advice.
  • Kathy
    Posts: 5,368
    Isn't there a movie on Netflix about a font or something?
    Thanked by 1melofluent
  • chonakchonak
    Posts: 8,737
    Thanked by 2Adam Wood Kathy
  • David AndrewDavid Andrew
    Posts: 1,193
    I prefer Perpetua to Garamond. It also has a "titling" version.

    I use both, plus a larger version in small caps for subtitles.

    One bit of advice: use a setting of no smaller than 14 pt with Perpetua, otherwise it's entirely too small to read.

    I'm told that it's the "official" typeset style for all the programs at Westminster Abbey.
  • Liam
    Posts: 4,393
    That's why I don't use Perpetua for space-constrained uses (the Abbey, like the Vatican, can afford to make programs as big as it wishes). Garamond is popular with designers precisely because it works well for space-constrained uses without becoming as evil on the eye as the Times family of fonts.

    I don't want to overburden the OP on this point, but if the OP is interested: line spacing (a paragraph formatting option) for 10 pt type should be 12; for 12 pt type it should be 14. (Or, if one prefers, a multiple of 1.15 or 1.2 as a proxy for specific variations; for fonts with very long descending characters, larger spacing may be required.) Don't fully double space between paragraphs, but something like 6 pts between paragraphs.
  • Adam WoodAdam Wood
    Posts: 6,412
    Here's a handy guide for various font styles:


    image
  • CharlesW
    Posts: 11,373
    You know The Dull Men's Club - look it up, it's real - once had a debate over the merits of Helvetica as opposed to Arial. The club's motto is, "Celebrating the ordinary."
    Thanked by 1jpal
  • Adam WoodAdam Wood
    Posts: 6,412
    Right on (sorta), ScottK.

    "Garamond" is an idea of a font, not a specific typeface.

    "Sabon" is a specific brand-name proprietary implementation of the idea of Garamond, with some particular requirements (compactness and consistency).

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sabon

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Garamond

    Other implementations of Garamond include a lot of fonts simply named "Garamond," which is confusing. Also, "Adobe Garamond" and "Adobe Garamond Premier Pro."

    Also-
    if you're trying to make something look classy and bookish online, use Georgia. Everyone has it, and its almost as nice as Garamond.

    Finally-
    Due to the prevalence of Times New Roman as the default typeface for MS Word, I tend to avoid it. It looks perfectly nice in its own merits. But overuse on EVERY. DAMN. DOCUMENT. EVER. causes it to bring unconscious feelings of mediocrity and secularity with it wherever it goes.
  • Hi, my name is Andy Motyka (*HI ANDY!*) and I have a confession.

    I'm apparently the only person here that really doesn't give a crap about fonts.
  • CharlesW
    Posts: 11,373
    Right, Andy! I'm with you! Fonts are either readable, or they are not. Usually, the more fancy the font, the less readable.
    Thanked by 1Andrew Motyka
  • Adam WoodAdam Wood
    Posts: 6,412
    I love fonts.
    I think it might be a problem, actually.
    Thanked by 1Andrew Motyka
  • ryandryand
    Posts: 1,640
    FontFreaks Annonymous.

    FFA for short.
  • rogue63
    Posts: 410
    My hand goes up with Andy Motyka. I mean, fonts can look nice and clean, or goofy and silly, but I don't understand the seriousness with which some of you are discussing these. Really, what am I missing? Why are fonts so important? No sarcasm intended. Why do fonts raise such a passion?
  • Ben YankeBen Yanke
    Posts: 3,115
    Due to the prevalence of Times New Roman as the default typeface for MS Word, I tend to avoid it. It looks perfectly nice in its own merits. But overuse on EVERY. DAMN. DOCUMENT. EVER. causes it to bring unconscious feelings of mediocrity and secularity with it wherever it goes.


    I feel the same way. I purposely avoid it for that reason alone.
  • Adam WoodAdam Wood
    Posts: 6,412
    My hand goes up with Andy Motyka. I mean, fonts can look nice and clean, or goofy and silly, but I don't understand the seriousness with which some of you are discussing these. Really, what am I missing? Why are fonts so important? No sarcasm intended. Why do fonts raise such a passion?


    The same reason organists get all interested and passionate about registration and voicing.

    Imagine a non-musician goes to Mass and tries to sing the music when appropriate and tries to listen prayerfully when appropriate. He leaves Mass either feeling great, or not. He sings with gusto, or not. The music moves him, or not.

    Now- obviously, there are a lot of non-musical things that contribute to any of those effects.

    But we ALL KNOW (I assume) that a change in registration can mean the difference between boredom and fervor, that a tempo a shade too fast or a shade too slow can drastically change the character of a piece, that a slightly out of tune instrument causes headaches.

    The non-musician does KNOW any of those things, but the effects are still there. He can't tell you what it was that caused his boredom or his fervor. And if he does guess, he's likely to be wrong. People blame boring text when the tempo is too slow. They say they don't like the organ because they've only heard it played boorishly. Whatever.

    Fonts are the same way.

    Some fonts have shown to increase comprehension, others to decrease it. Some fonts cause people to read faster, other fonts slower. Self-published books (until recently) always seemed a little cheap and weird, but most people couldn't put their finger on why - it was usually the font and other type-setting factors. Dictionaries tend to use particular fonts, newspapers other fonts, etc.

    These things affect people, but people are blithely unaware of why they distrusted a website or believed the claims in some magazine.

    People who aren't musicians think that pretty much anyone who can carry a tune or fake it on a keyboard is qualified to be a parish Music Director- and as long as the quality isn't EGREGIOUS there is no way for them to realize that someone with a better sense of vocal blend or a better handle on chant rhythm would have a huge impact on the quality of the liturgy and the effect that has on the community.

    Typography - and more generally Graphic Design and Layout - is just like that, except WAY more people think they can put together a nice worship aide or programme than think they can play the organ.
  • OlbashOlbash
    Posts: 311
    I'm rather fond of Minion. It's the standard font for "Magnificat" publications, and the Smithsonian museums.
  • melofluentmelofluent
    Posts: 4,160
    Papyrus for EVERYTHING!
    Thanked by 2Adam Wood ryand
  • CGM
    Posts: 528
    My preference is Adobe Caslon. It has the best elements of Garamond and Minion rolled into one super-classy, eminently readable font.
  • Liam
    Posts: 4,393
    But Caslon is not in Word 2010.
  • rogue63
    Posts: 410
    Thank you, Adam. I am quite willing to learn, but sometimes the learning curve is steep.
  • Liam
    Posts: 4,393
    Btw, Georgia is good for reading on a screen, but less so on a printed page. Garamond is the reverse. Fonts are funny that way.
    Thanked by 1Adam Wood
  • chonakchonak
    Posts: 8,737
    Why do fonts raise such a passion?

    First of all, fonts can make a document more beautiful or less; on the practical side, they can make it more readable or less.

    Sans-serif fonts were invented in the 20th century for advertising use, and really just for titles; extended text in a sans-serif font tends to be less readable on paper than a serif font. On the other hand, research has indicated that sans fonts tend to be more readable on computer screens than serif fonts. (That's really counter-intuitive to me.)

    Also, the choice of a font indicates a time horizon for the document. A document set in a sans-serif font -- for example, Helvetica, whose popularity peaked in the 1970s -- comes with the associations of that time: for example, disposable consumer-culture. It doesn't say: "designed for lasting beauty".

    A document set in Caslon brings the 1700s to mind: if you're working for a local church that dates to the American colonial era, it could be very appropriate.


    Thanked by 2Adam Wood Mark M.
  • Mark M.Mark M.
    Posts: 632
    I've enjoyed using Bernhard Modern when I can.

    When my dad passed away this summer, the computer I had with me didn't have that font, so I ended up using Garamond for the funeral program.
  • CharlesW
    Posts: 11,373
    Ah, but the quill and inkwell. Now there were fonts! Come thou font of every blessing...LOL.
  • Actually, I'll say that I appreciate these discussions on fonts because I know so little about them, and can use some advice in this area. I just can't get excited about them the way Adam can; that was my main observation above.
    Thanked by 1Adam Wood
  • My preferred method is Century Gothic, set to small caps. This may not be best in all situations, though.

    I've also used Georgia with success. It's like TNR, but a bit nicer.
  • Ally
    Posts: 224
    I really appreciate this discussion too. I've hardly ever used small caps before, but since reading this I've been using Garamond with small caps in the subtitles, and it's changed my worship-aid-creating life :)
    Thanked by 2Adam Wood Ben Yanke
  • chonakchonak
    Posts: 8,737
    Feel free to post PDF examples, folks.
  • Adam WoodAdam Wood
    Posts: 6,412
    I just started using Linux Libertine and Linux Biolinum for a project today. They're very nice.
  • I'm wondering if the original request was actually for a template?