Anglican Chant Gospel Alleluias
  • Two things:

    1. A guide to singing AC, specifically tailored to these chants, is in the works.

    2. No one, absolutely no one, can agree on the proper (or improper) pointing of Anglican Chant. For that reason, don't bother posting complaints, changes, corrections or anything publicly about the pointing. It will only cause some for whom this may be the answer to their situation to doubt whether or not they know enough to do them or not.

    Got suggestions, complaints - send them to me privately, they'll be read

    Why do these? Simpler than Gregorian Chant tones (endings do not change to match antiphons), work well with English, may be sung by one or in SATB. Anglicans knew what they were doing when they wrote these. Give it a try.

    Noel
  • PeterJ
    Posts: 87
    Thank you for these, Noel.

    I am just about to post a little something on a new thread I've been pulling together lately...
    Thanked by 1noel jones, aago
  • Is there sufficient interest in having Anglican Chant added as a category?
  • CHGiffenCHGiffen
    Posts: 5,001
    Is there sufficient interest in having Anglican Chant added as a category?

    I think so.
  • chonakchonak
    Posts: 8,958
    Good idea.
  • chonakchonak
    Posts: 8,958
    Or would something broader be useful, to take in other music of the Anglican tradition?
  • CHGiffenCHGiffen
    Posts: 5,001
    Or would something broader be useful, to take in other music of the Anglican tradition?

    Personally, I think that Anglican Chant is a liturgical music genre which, while perhaps not on equal footing with Gregorian Chant amongst many Roman Catholics and Catholic musicians, is a chant form worthy of particular attention, in light of its appearance in the liturgies in Catholic churches within the Anglican Ordinariate. In addition, it is a well-developed liturgical chant form with a long tradition that adapts well to vernacular English Psalm and other texts, and, as such, is already making inroads within Roman Catholic music.

    I'm not sure what other music in the Anglican tradition might fit in an Anglican Music category alongside Anglican Chant. It seems to me that, once one moves outside the realm of chant in the Anglican tradition, one is immersed in the world of sacred polyphony and hymnody (and perhaps some vernacular plainsong), which are already represented by categories here.
  • chonakchonak
    Posts: 8,958
    OK, done.
    Thanked by 2CHGiffen marymezzo
  • MHIMHI
    Posts: 324
    .
    Thanked by 1CHGiffen
  • chonakchonak
    Posts: 8,958
    Really, there oughta be more discussion of falsobordone here.
    Thanked by 1Adam Wood
  • MHIMHI
    Posts: 324
    .
  • Adam WoodAdam Wood
    Posts: 6,428
    Really, there oughta be more discussion of falsobordone here.

    Yes.

    But first, we should have a serious debate over how to spell it.
    Thanked by 2Richard Mix Gavin
  • In projected discussions, please do not commit the error of classifying all chant in four (or more; or three) parts as "Anglican." Harmonic chant, elaborating upon the Gregorian tones, emerged during the Middle Ages (so "Gregorian in the tenor" chants are not an Anglican invention); and this is to say nothing of Eastern chant.


    To fail to trace back to the origins of Anglican chant to Gregorian chant here would be like disavowing knowledge of a relative who was a known scoundrel...
    Thanked by 1CHGiffen
  • MHIMHI
    Posts: 324
    .
    Thanked by 1CHGiffen
  • Perhaps something on the order of
    'Harmonised Chant Genres', or
    'Anglican Chant and Faux-burdon', or
    separate categories, like..
    1) Anglican Chant
    2) Faux-burden

    -As Adam intimates, there IS, really, a difference between 'fa-burden', and 'faux-burden' (and 'falso bordone'). The former is, indeed, an English genre, of XV. century pedigree, in which improvising added pitches to a cantus firmus results in a series of sixth chords. This was also known as 'sight' singing, as it was improvised 'at sight' according to received conventions. Faux-burdon is a French technique, also of at least XV. century pedigree, of notated harmonised chant in which two of four voices were written out. The Spanish falso bordone is not to be confused with the French faux-burdon: in it, all four voices are notated.

    Nowadays, the three terms are commonly assumed to be synonymous of a single style or genre and are used rather interchangeably. One often sees any kind of harmonisations of a chant cf called faburdens, fauxburdons, and, ocassionally, falso bordone. Actually, while obvious cousins, they are distinct categories.

    How far we have fallen... when we can't sing any part music at all of any kind that is not fully written out by a 'composer'. We would be amazed at the improvised polyphony of which our forbears were masters.

    I think that a category called 'Harmonised Chant Genres' would be really good, and would cover them all.