Easter Vigil Alleluia
  • rogue63
    Posts: 404
    So, I've been hired as music director for a parish----great job, great pastor, receptive choir, friendly people, and a HUGE raise. Deo gratias! I can actually buy food for my family now!

    On to the practical: how does the Easter Vigil Alleluia work, with the triple intoning and raising pitch? Priest sings? Cantor sings? Do the people respond? Does anyone do this/has anyone done this in an OF setting? Any thoughts are helpful.
  • Ben YankeBen Yanke
    Posts: 3,114
    At my cathedral (OF), the bishop intones it unaccompanied, the congregation repeats accompanied. Organist intones the first 3 notes at a raised pitch, bishop starts process again.

    After that, the thurifer comes out, the organist improvises during the incense preparation, and we do the alleluia from O Filii et Filiæ, along with choral verses.

    That's what we do. Obviously, if your priest isn't up to it, a cantor could do it.
    Thanked by 1Paul_Onnonhoaraton
  • rogue63
    Posts: 404
    Thanks! I wasn't sure when to insert the Alleluia with its verse, but your description makes sense. The Triple Alleluia, then, is a musical entity unto itself, a cry of joy in the middle of the night?
    Thanked by 1Paul_Onnonhoaraton
  • I have seen GREAT VARIETY in the way this Triple Alleluia is treated in modern (post-Conciliar) chant books.
  • congrats, by the way !!!
  • rogue63
    Posts: 404
    Right you are---the Gregorian Missal indicates the melody of the Alleuia, but no instruction for triple intoning, then straight to "Confitemini Domino...".

    A WLP missalette I have uses the Alleluia melody from "O filii et filiae", then alternates with three verses from Ps. 117.

    A hand missal makes no mention of a triple Alleluia, but includes the verses and responsory. I mean, can I just make up what I think works?

    My new boss has faculties as in the Ruthenian Rite, and he is deeply devoted to Eastern spirituality. He's a good sport, and frequently kids me that the Roman church shot itself in the foot with all the options and tinkering. This Alleluia is one unfortunate example!
  • jpal
    Posts: 365
    We do:

    (1) Melismatic alleluia intoned by cantor
    (2) All repeat
    (3) Cantor sings a step higher
    (4) All repeat
    (5) Cantor sings a step higher
    (6) All repeat
    (7) Cantors sing verse
    (8) All sing alleluia

    The whole thing is a cappella. And the "all" above is the intent, but not the result. ;-)
    Thanked by 1Chris Allen
  • rogue63
    Posts: 404
    @jpal:

    So for (8), does everyone sing the last and highest alleluia? The same melismatic melody? If so, that's actually 4 iterations.
  • smvanroodesmvanroode
    Posts: 700
    In the Lumen Christi Missal the following has been adopted (according to the rubrics in the Roman Missal):

    After the epistle has been read, all rise, then the Priest solemnly intones the Alleluia three
    times, raising his voice by a step each time, with all repeating it.
    Then the psalmist or cantor proclaims Psalm 118 (117) with the people responding Alleluia.


    The Alleluia used in the LCM is the one found in the Graduale Romanum. While the GR has only a single verse from Psalm 118, the Lectionary gives three verses: 1-2, 16ab-17 and 22-23, after each of which is repeated the Alleluia.

    So:
    (1) Melismatic alleluia intoned by Priest
    (2) All repeat
    (3) Priest sings a step higher
    (4) All repeat
    (5) Priest sings a step higher
    (6) All repeat
    [Meanwhile the Priest, in the usual way, puts incense in the thurible and blesses the Deacon]
    (7) Psalmist or cantor sings verse Ps 118(117): 1-2
    (8) All sing alleluia
    (9) Psalmist or cantor sings verse Ps 118(117): 16ab-17
    (10) All sing alleluia
    (11) Psalmist or cantor sings verse Ps 118(117): 22-23
    (12) All sing alleluia
  • I will give starting notes to my Celebrant each time, and he will sing it acapella. Then, I will accompany it the second time through on the organ so it doesn't turn into a hot mess.
  • smvanroodesmvanroode
    Posts: 700
    That is a good idea: at St Peter's it was done this way as well (2011 Easter Vigil):

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4DvRrrdOfbo

    However, they use the well-known mode VI communion antiphon for the repetition between the verses (plus some additional singing to cover the liturgical actions taking place).
  • In the Simple Gradual there is an ingenious threefold vigil alleluia based on the Easter dismissal alleluias: https://dl.dropbox.com/u/7331043/Bilingual Vigil Alle Psalm.doc

    The Schola of Saint Peter’s-in-the-Loop recorded this beautifully: https://dl.dropbox.com/u/7331043/10 Easter Vigil.mp3
  • jpal
    Posts: 365
    @rogue63
    Yes, that's right.
  • They had used the dismissal Alleluia the first year I arrived. The following year we learned the "real" Alleluia. Intoned by the celebrant, repeated by all, three times in rising tones. Then the cantors & choir sing the Confitemini Domino and then all repeat the
    Alleluia. For me this heralds the Resurrection more than anything.
    Thanked by 2BruceL CHGiffen
  • francisfrancis
    Posts: 8,102
    Calling Paul Ford!

    I was trying to get the files you posted above^^^ but the links aren't working anymore. Is it still possible to access the files. Thanks in advance.