Liber Usualis / Anybody have a copy with RUBRICS IN ENGLISH from before 1961 ?
  • RagueneauRagueneau
    Posts: 2,592
    Liber Usualis / Anybody have a copy with RUBRICS IN ENGLISH from before 1961 ?
  • tomjaw
    Posts: 1,249
    I have a 1952 copy with English Rubrics beside me at the moment. I may have older copies at home (I am on Holiday).
  • Good morning JMO,
    Do you need to look at anything in particular from an old edition of The Liber Usualis?
    Jacques
    Thanked by 1Ragueneau
  • RagueneauRagueneau
    Posts: 2,592
    Hello!

    Yes, I am curious as to specific parts of the Introductory notes.

    THANKS!
  • Hi,
    This is a brief description of what is in the pages with Roman numbers in a few editions of The Liber Usualis, Desclée No.801, with titles and rubrics in English.
    As far as it looks, there is no difference between the 3 last versions 1961, 1962 and 1963.

    ------------------------------------------
    1934 The Liber Usualis No.801
    (c)1934. Imprimatur 28 Nov 1934. Not dated.

    vii-viii Introduction
    ix-xvi Preface to the Vatican Edition
    xvii-xxxix Rule for interpretation
    xL Table of moveable feasts (1940 to 1975)
    xLi-xLix Roman Calendar
    L Prayer before/after Divine Office

    ------------------------------------------
    1947 The Liber Usualis No.801
    (c)1934. Imprimatur 1 Jun 1947. Dated 1947.

    vii-viii Introduction
    ix-xvi Preface to the Vatican Edition
    xvii-xxxix Rule for interpretation
    xL Table of moveable feasts (1947 to 1982)
    xLi-xLix Roman Calendar
    L Prayer before/after Divine Office

    ------------------------------------------
    1952 The Liber Usualis No.801
    (c)1952. Imprimatur 20 Jun 1952. Dated 1952.

    vii-viii Introduction
    ix-xvi Preface to the Vatican Edition
    xvii-xxxix Rule for interpretation
    xL Table of moveable feasts (1951 to 1986)
    xLi-xLix Roman Calendar
    L Prayer before/after Divine Office

    ------------------------------------------
    1952 The Liber Usualis No.801
    (c)1952. Imprimatur 20 Jun 1952. Not dated. Printed in New York.

    vii-viii Introduction
    ix-xvi Preface to the Vatican Edition
    xvii-xxxix Rule for interpretation
    xL Table of moveable feasts (1953 to 1988)
    xLi-xLix Roman Calendar
    L Prayer before/after Divine Office

    ------------------------------------------
    1956 The Liber Usualis No.801
    (c)1956. Imprimatur 15 Mai 1956. Not dated.

    1959 The Liber Usualis No.801
    (c)1956. Imprimatur 15 Mai 1956. Dated 1959.

    vii-viii Introduction
    ix-xvi Preface to the Vatican Edition
    xvii-xxxix Rule for interpretation
    xL Table of moveable feasts (1957 to 1992)
    xLi-xLix Roman Calendar
    L Prayer before/after Divine Office
    ... annonced in the table of content 1956
    but actually missing in both 1956 and 1959!)
    Li-xcvii Changes in the Liber Usualis

    ------------------------------------------
    1961 The Liber Usualis No.801
    (c)1961. Imprimatur 7 Feb 1961. Dated 1961.

    1962 The Liber Usualis No.801
    (c)1961. Imprimatur 6 Mar 1962. Dated 1962.

    1963 The Liber Usualis No.801
    (c)1961. Imprimatur 6 Aug 1963. Dated 1963.

    vii-viii Introduction
    ix-xvi Preface to the Vatican Edition
    xvii-xxxix Rule for interpretation
    xL Table of moveable feasts (1961 to 1996)
    xLi-xLix Roman Calendar
    Li-cix Changes in the Liber Usualis

    ------------------------------------------
    http://www.gregorianbooks.com/gregorian_books.html
  • tomjaw
    Posts: 1,249
    I wondered is this referring to the Rubrical changes... page XV of 1952 L.U. same page in 1962 ed. on Musica Sacra

    Part I: The suggestion of singing the Introit verses if there is time added to 1962 ed.
    Part VI: The suggestion of sing the 'ancient Gregorian chants' (the verses) OR singing a psalm added to 1962 ed.
    Part VII: The changes to the Sanctus, No splitting of the Benedictus when sung in chant etc.
    Part VIII: The changes to the Communion, adding psalm verses etc.
    Part X: Not found in 1952 version
  • 1961 The Liber Usualis
    Changes in The Liber Usualis (page Li)
    from decree "Rubricae Breviarii et Missalis romani", 25 July 1960.

    I. General rubrics (Li)
    A) Sundays
    - Concurrence between Sundays and Feasts (Lii)

    B) Ferias (Liii)
    C) Vigils (Liv)
    D) Feasts
    E) Octaves (Lv)

    F) The liturgical seasons
    - a) The season of Advent
    - b) The Christmas season (tempus natalicium), includes:
    --> the season of the Nativity (tempus Nativitatis)
    --> the season of the Epiphany
    - c) The season of Septuagesima (Lvi)
    - d) The season of Lent (tempus quadragesimale), 2 periods:
    --> a) the season of Lent (tempus Quadragesimae)
    --> b) Passiontide (incl. Holy Week/Triduum sacrum)
    e) Paschal Time (tempus paschale), 3 periods:
    --> a) the season of Easter (tempus Paschatis)
    --> b) the season of the Ascension
    --> c) the octave of Whit Sunday
    f) The season « per annum »

    G) The Greater and Lesser Litanies (Lvii)
    - a) The Greater Litanies
    - b) The Lesser Litanies or Rogation days

    H) Commemorations
    Privileged commemorations:
    - a) of the Sunday
    - b) of a liturgical day of I class
    - c) of the days in the octave of Christmas
    - d) of the September Ember days
    - e) of the weekdays of Advent, Lent, and the Passion
    - f) of the Greater Litanies, at Mass

    II. Rubrics for the Office (Lix)
    a) General Rules
    b) The time when the canonical Hours should be said
    c) Arrangement of the divine Office (Lx)

    * The various parts of the Office:
    a) Beginning and end of the Hours
    b) Conclusion of the Office
    c) Hymns
    d) Antiphons (Lxi)
    e) Psalms and canticles

    III. Rubrics for the Mass (Lxii)
    A) General principles and rules
    B) Conventual Mass
    C) The various parts of the Mass (Lxiii)
    - 1) The psalm 'Iudica me, Deus', the Confiteor and the censing of the altar
    - 2) The prayers at sung Mass
    - 3) The lessons at Mass (Lxiv)
    - 4) The Creed
    - 5) The offertory and communion antiphons (Lxv)
    - 6) Holy Communion
    - 7) The conclusion of Mass

    Changes in the Calendar (Lxvii)

    The ordinary of the divine Office (Lxviii)
    a) Hymn melodies at the lesser Hours
    b) Sunday at Prime (Lxix)
    c) Sunday at Terce, Sext and None (Lxx)
    d) Sunday Vespers
    e) Sunday Compline (Lxxi)
    f) Saturday Vespers
    g) Saturday Compline

    Proper of Time (Lxxii)
    * The season of Advent

    * The Christmas season
    - 1. Christmas day
    - 2. The three days after Christmas (Lxxiii)
    - 3. Sunday in the octave of Christmas (Lxxiv)
    - 4. Days in the octave of Christmas
    - 5. Octave day of Christmas (January 1)
    - 6. Feast of the Holy Name of Jesus - II class (Lxxv)
    - 7. January 2-5
    - 8. Epiphany - I class
    - 9. First Sunday after Epiphany:
    --> Feast of the Holy Family - II class
    - 10. January 7-12 (Lxxvi)
    - 11. Commemoration of Our Lord's baptism (Jan 13 - II Class)

    * The season of Lent
    - Ash Wednesday
    - Sundays of Lent (Lxxvii)
    - Other ferias
    - Friday after I Sunday of the Passion
    - Holy Week

    * Paschal Time
    - Low Sunday - I class
    - Feasts of Saints in Paschal Time (Lxxviii)
    - The Rogation days
    - Ascension Eve

    * The season of the Ascension (Lxxix)
    - Ascension day - I class
    - Sunday after the Ascension
    - Whitsun Eve
    - Whitsun Sunday and its octave - I class
    - Trinity Sunday - I class (Lxxx)
    - Corpus Christi - I class
    - The Sacred Heart - I class
    - II and III Sundays after Pentecost

    Common of Saints (Lxxxi)

    Proper of Saints (Lxxxii)
    a) The festive Office
    b) The semi-festive Office
    c) The ordinary Office

    * Feasts of November (Lxxxiii)
    * Feasts of December
    * Feasts of January (Lxxxiv)
    * Feasts of February (Lxxxvi)
    * Feasts of March (Lxxxviii)
    * Feasts of April (Lxxxix)
    * Feasts of May (xc)
    * Feasts of June (xcii)
    * Feasts of July (xciv)
    * Feasts of August (xcvi)
    * Feasts of September (xcix)
    * Feasts of October (cii)
    * Feasts of November (cv)

    # Times when the use of musical instruments is forbidden (cviii)
  • Found in these 4 editions:
    1959 The Liber Usualis
    1961 The Liber Usualis
    1962 The Liber Usualis
    1963 The Liber Usualis
    in bold are the changes and additions from edition 1956.

    Preface to the Vatican Edition of the Roman Chant (page xv)

    RUBRICS FOR THE CHANT OF THE MASS.
    I. When the priest goes towards the altar, the cantors begin the Introit. On Ferias and Simples the Intonation is to be sung by one cantor as far as the sign * : on other Feasts and Sundays, there should be two cantors: but on Solemn Feasts there should be four, if as many as four are available. The choir continues until the Psalm. The first part of the Verse of the Psalm as far as the asterisk, and the V. Gloria Patri, are sung by the cantors, the full choir taking up the rest of the verse. Afterwards, the Introit as far as the Psalm is repeated by the full choir.
    . If the priest and ministers have some way to go in the church before reaching the altar, there is no reason why several Verses of the Introit Psalm should not be sung after the Antiphon and Verse. In that case the Antiphon may be repeated after every Verse or two Verses. When the priest reaches the altar, the Psalm is if necessary interrupted at the end of a Verse, Gloria Patri is sung, and finally the Antiphon.

    II. When the Antiphon is over, the choir sings the Kyrie eleison thrice, the Christe eleison thrice, and again the Kyrie eleison thrice, alternately with the cantors, or with the other half of the choir. But the last Kyrie eleison is divided into two or three parts, marked by a single or double asterisk. If there be only two parts, and hence only a single asterisk, the first part is sung by the cantors or by the first half of the choir, the second part by the full choir. If there are three parts, the first being marked by the simple asterisk, and the second by the double one, then, the first part is sung by the same side as in the former case : but the second part, which repeats the melody of the first part, is sung by the other half of the choir: and the third part is by both sides together. Sometimes there are even five parts : then the manner of dividing the alternations in the chanting is marked by the single or double dividing sign being several times inserted; what has been said above sufficiently explains the execution.

    III. The priest alone in a clear voice gives the Intonation of the Gloria in excelsis Deo, and then Et in terra pax hominibus, etc., is continued by the choir divided into two parts, which answer each other, or else the full choir sings in alternation with the precentors. Then follows the response of the choir to the Dominus vobiscum.

    IV. After the Epistle or Lesson one or two cantors give the Intonation of the Responsory, which is called the Gradual, as far as the sign *, and all, or at any rate the cantors chosen, conclude the chant with due care. Two sing the Verse of the Gradual, and, after the final asterisk, the full choir finishes it; or else, if the responsorial method is preferred, the full choir repeats the first part of the Responsory after the Verse is finished by the cantors or cantor.
    . If Alleluia, Alleluia is to be said with the Verse, the first Alleluia is sung by one or two voices as far as the asterisk * : and then the choir repeats the Alleluia. continuing with the neum or jubilus which prolongs the syllable a. The cantors next sing the Verse, which is finished by the full choir, as before, beginning at the asterisk. When the Verse is finished, the cantor or cantors repeat the Alleluia, and the full choir sings only the closing neum.
    . After Septuagesima, the Alleluia and the following Verse are left out, and the Tract is sung, its Versicles being chanted alternately by the two sides of the choir answering each other, or else by the cantors and the full choir.
    . In Paschal Time, the Gradual is omitted and in its place the Alleluia, Alleluia is sung with its Verse as above. Then one Alleluia immediately follows, which must be begun by one or two cantors until the neum is reached, when it is not repeated, but finished by the full choir. The Verse and one Alleluia are sung at the end, in the manner above described.
    . The Sequences are sung alternately, either by the cantors and the choir, and or else by the alternate sides of the choir.

    V. When the Gospel is finished, the priest gives the Intonation of the Credo (if it is to be sung), the choir continuing with the Patrem omnipotentem, the rest, according to custom, being sung either in full choir or alternately.

    VI. The Offertory is begun by one, two or four cantors, in the same way as the Introit, and is finished by the full choir.
    . After the Offertory Antiphon the choir may sing to the ancient Gregorian chants those Verses which it was once customary to sing at this place.
    . If the Offertory Antiphon is taken from a Psalm, other Verses of the same Psalm may be sung. In that case the Antiphon may be repeated after every Verse or two Verses. When the Offertory is over, the Psalm ends with Gloria Patri, and the Antiphon is repeated.
    . If the Antiphon is not taken from a Psalm, some Psalm suitable to the feast may be chosen. After the Offertory Antiphon some other Latin piece may be sung suitable for this part of the Mass; which, however, must not be prolonged after the Secret.


    VII. When the Preface is finished, the choir goes on with Sanctus and Benedictus.
    If these are sung to Gregorian chant they must be given without a break; if not, Benedictus may follow the Consecration. During the Consecration all singing must cease, and (even if there is a custom to the contrary) the organ or other instrument is silent. It is preferable that there should be silence from the Consecration until Pater noster.


    VIII. After the Response at the Pax Domini, the Agnus Dei is sung thrice: either by the full choir, the Intonation being given by one, two or four cantors each time: or alternately, but in such a way as to have the Dona nobis pacem, or the word sempiternam in the Mass of the Dead, sung by the full choir.
    . After the Communion, the full choir sings the Antiphon which is thus named, the Intonation being sung by one, two or four cantors as in the case of the Introit.
    . The Communion Antiphon is sung while the priest is consuming the Blessed Sacrament. When there are other communicants, the Antiphon is begun when the priest distributes Communion. If the Antiphon is taken from a Psalm, other Verses of the same Psalm may be sung. In that case the Antiphon may be repeated after every Verse or two Verses; and when the Communion is ended Gloria Patri followed by the Antiphon is sung.
    . If the Antiphon is not taken from a Psalm, some Psalm suitable to the feast and to this part of the Mass may be chosen.
    . After the Communion Antiphon, especially if the Communion takes a long time, some other Latin piece suitable to the occasion may be sung.


    IX. The priest or the deacon sings the Ite Missa est, or the Benedicamus Domino, and the choir answers with the Deo gratias in the same tone.
    . In the Mass of the Dead, the choir answers Amen to the Requiescant in pace.

    X. It is possible that for a good reason some piece assigned to cantors or choir cannot be sung as noted in the liturgical books; for instance, the singers are too few, or not sufficiently skilful, or the chant or the rite is too long. In that case the only alternative allowed is that the whole piece should be recited recto tono (on one note), or sung to a Psalm tone; this may be accompanied by the organ.
  • The two previous comments describing:
    - the « Changes in the Liber Usualis »
    - and the « Rubrics for the chant of the Mass »
    are written down, as a reference, from the CMAA/MusicaSacra PDF of the 1961 The Liber Usualis No.801, (c)1961, Imprimatur 7 Feb 1961, dated 1961.
    http://media.musicasacra.com/pdf/liberusualis.pdf
  • Found in these 4 editions:
    1934 The Liber Usualis
    1947 The Liber Usualis
    1952 The Liber Usualis
    1956 The Liber Usualis
    Also check the modified comment above for changes and additions (in bold) in the later editions 1959, 1961, 1962 and 1963.

    Preface to the Vatican Edition of the Roman Chant (page xv)

    RUBRICS FOR THE CHANT OF THE MASS.
    I. When the priest goes towards the altar, the cantors begin the Introit. On Ferias and Simples the Intonation is to be sung by one cantor as far as the sign * : on other Feasts and Sundays, there should be two cantors: but on Solemn Feasts there should be four, if as many as four are available. The choir continues until the Psalm. The first part of the Verse of the Psalm as far as the asterisk, and the V. Gloria Patri, are sung by the cantors, the full choir taking up the rest of the verse. Afterwards, the Introit as far as the Psalm is repeated by the full choir.

    II. When the Antiphon is over, the choir sings the Kyrie eleison thrice, the Christe eleison thrice, and again the Kyrie eleison thrice, alternately with the cantors, or with the other half of the choir. But the last Kyrie eleison is divided into two or three parts, marked by a single or double asterisk. If there be only two parts, and hence only a single asterisk, the first part is sung by the cantors or by the first half of the choir, the second part by the full choir. If there are three parts, the first being marked by the simple asterisk, and the second by the double one, then, the first part is sung by the same side as in the former case : but the second part, which repeats the melody of the first part, is sung by the other half of the choir: and the third part is by both sides together. Sometimes there are even five parts : then the manner of dividing the alternations in the chanting is marked by the single or double dividing sign being several times inserted; what has been said above sufficiently explains the execution.

    III. The priest alone in a clear voice gives the Intonation of the Gloria in excelsis Deo, and then Et in terra pax hominibus, etc., is continued by the choir divided into two parts, which answer each other, or else the full choir sings in alternation with the precentors. Then follows the response of the choir to the Dominus vobiscum.

    IV. After the Epistle or Lesson one or two cantors give the Intonation of the Responsory, which is called the Gradual, as far as the sign *, and all, or at any rate the cantors chosen, conclude the chant with due care. Two sing the Verse of the Gradual, and, after the final asterisk, the full choir finishes it; or else, if the responsorial method is preferred, the full choir repeats the first part of the Responsory after the Verse is finished by the cantors or cantor.
    . If Alleluia, Alleluia is to be said with the Verse, the first Alleluia is sung by one or two voices as far as the asterisk * : and then the choir repeats the Alleluia. continuing with the neum or jubilus which prolongs the syllable a. The cantors next sing the Verse, which is finished by the full choir, as before, beginning at the asterisk. When the Verse is finished, the cantor or cantors repeat the Alleluia, and the full choir sings only the closing neum.
    . After Septuagesima, the Alleluia and the following Verse are left out, and the Tract is sung, its Versicles being chanted alternately by the two sides of the choir answering each other, or else by the cantors and the full choir.
    . In Paschal Time, the Gradual is omitted and in its place the Alleluia, Alleluia is sung with its Verse as above. Then one Alleluia immediately follows, which must be begun by one or two cantors until the neum is reached, when it is not repeated, but finished by the full choir. The Verse and one Alleluia are sung at the end, in the manner above described.
    . The Sequences are sung alternately, either by the cantors and the choir, and or else by the alternate sides of the choir.

    V. When the Gospel is finished, the priest gives the Intonation of the Credo (if it is to be sung), the choir continuing with the Patrem omnipotentem, the rest, according to custom, being sung either in full choir or alternately.

    VI. The Offertory is begun by one, two or four cantors, in the same way as the Introit, and is finished by the full choir.

    VII. When the Preface is finished, the choir goes on with the Sanctus etc., but exclusive of Benedictus qui venit. Then only is the Elevation of the Blessed Sacrament. Meanwhile the choir is silent and adores with the rest. After the Elevation the choir sings Benedictus.

    VIII. After the Response at the Pax Domini, the Agnus Dei is sung thrice: either by the full choir, the Intonation being given by one, two or four cantors each time: or alternately, but in such a way as to have the Dona nobis pacem, or the word sempiternam in the Mass of the Dead, sung by the full choir.
    . After the Communion, the full choir sings the Antiphon which is thus named, the Intonation being sung by one, two or four cantors as in the case of the Introit.

    IX. The priest or the deacon sings the Ite Missa est, or the Benedicamus Domino, and the choir answers with the Deo gratias in the same tone.
    . In the Mass of the Dead, the choir answers Amen to the Requiescant in pace.
    Thanked by 1Paul F. Ford