Chaplet of the Divine Mercy sung in Gregorian Chant
  • aldrich
    Posts: 222
    I know some are wary about the Divine Mercy devotion, but I am posting my chant version of the devotion anyway. So, here it is. Download away if you find it useful.
  • bgeorge77
    Posts: 190
    Interesting, did you compose the music yourself? If not, where does the music come from?
  • Aristotle Esguerra has several lovely settings of the Divine Mercy chaplet which I have used.
  • I should know better than to ask, but why is anyone leery of the Divine Mercy devotion?
  • Because the Divine Mercy devotion was suppressed and Sister Faustina's works placed on the Index Librorum Prohibitorum under arch-conservative Cardinal Ottaviani in 1959, and not rehabilitated until a couple of decades later -- mostly at the behest of a certain Cardinal Wojtyla, who as Pope John Paul II would ultimately be the one to establish Divine Mercy Sunday and beatify Sister Faustina. Thus, people who are suspicious and mistrustful of anything that happened after Vatican II (particularly when it involved a direct reversal of something decided prior), and especially people who hold Bl. JPII to be an untrustworthy modernist, would be very skeptical of Divine Mercy (all the more so, I suppose, since it involves promoting a conception of a merciful God and not, say, a wrathful God).
    Thanked by 1Waymazing123
  • So then because John of the Cross was imprisoned by his superiors, we shouldn't believe him? I am afraid you caught it well with that wrathful God comment. So unattractive, that emphasis. God's judgment should be part of our consciousness daily, but there was a Cross.
  • CharlesW
    Posts: 10,508
    I heard a priest say last week, that he is leery of any novena that treats Easter as the third day of a novena. I understood that he meant nothing trumps Easter. As for JPII, some folks love him, some hate him, and some don't care about him. At any rate, this devotion may not have become so established and popular without him.
    Thanked by 1ebullock
  • Of course, on JPII's importance. And those who 'don't care about him" or 'hate him" are missing a lot. I've been rereading Veritatis Splendor. That, and there was the seeing him in person, which I did, always in Rome, about 8 or 10 times.

    I understand your priest's point, sort of, but doesn't a meditation that begins on Good Friday and lasts through the Octave of Easter concentrating on the mercy God showed us through the Cross make sense? An attempt to make the average person focus on the whole time period, as opposed to forgetting about Easter the minute they walk out the church on Easter morning?

    I am Catholic, period. God is just as active now as he was in 1563 or something. I mean, I say myprayers in Latin, love the Mass in Latin, sing Chant, subscribe to the doctrines of the Church without cavil or reservation. But Traditionalists and Modernists seem to forget it's all still the same Church. If there is a new devotion, why is it different than an old devotion, and vice versa. Roma locuta est, and that does it for me.
  • CharlesW
    Posts: 10,508
    Who knows? I have nothing against the chaplet. It is one out of many available devotions. If it works for you, use it.

    I didn't think so much of JPII when he was alive, and thought him a terrible administrator. In retrospect, I appreciate him more today. He managed to hold the Church together, if by nothing else, his personality. Some of the results Pope Benedict achieves were made possible by the work of his predecessor.
  • My only problem with the Divine Mercy novena is, on Easter Sunday, having the pious spinster tapping on the organ console for me to stop the Widor Toccata so the group could get on with the novena. (sigh)
    Thanked by 1ebullock
  • CharlesW
    Posts: 10,508
    Sounds like the pious spinster needs a good smack.
  • @njgw, OMG, LOL,,!!! You should have went right into Bach's Toccata and Fugue in d minor, or even better, suite gothique, just for her! And made it know that it was just for her, LOL
  • Why not use the ordinary chants for Pater noster and Ave Maria?
  • tomjaw
    Posts: 1,837
    Of course, on JPII's importance. And those who 'don't care about him" or 'hate him" are missing a lot.


    In the monumental amount of religious works produced over the last 2000 years, anybody who prefers to ignore the last 60 is missing a speck. If you don't care about the Fathers of the Church you will be missing a lot, the Bible, St. Thomas Aquinas could also be described as missing a lot.

    Some people love Divine Mercy well great for them... Me, I prefer to spend that time saying the Rosary, or the Divine Office. So feel free to say the Divine Mercy Chaplet etc. but while you do so leave me to my Rosary / Office.
    Thanked by 1CCooze
  • Interesting, did you compose the music yourself? If not, where does the music come from?


    The Signum Crucis is the festal tone for Vespers' Deus in adjutorium meum intende

    The Pater Noster is tonus peregrinus, used for chanting parts of the Office.

    The Ave Maria, curiously and interestingly, is the tone used for the last part of the Passion on Palm Sunday and Good Friday.

    I can't yet place the Credo or the other prayers.
    Thanked by 1eft94530
  • francisfrancis
    Posts: 8,812
    Wow
  • aldrich
    Posts: 222
    The Signum Crucis is the festal tone for Vespers' Deus in adjutorium meum intende

    The Pater Noster is tonus peregrinus, used for chanting parts of the Office.

    The Ave Maria, curiously and interestingly, is the tone used for the last part of the Passion on Palm Sunday and Good Friday.

    I can't yet place the Credo or the other prayers.


    Credo is modified psalm tone 1.f.

    The other prayers were composed from scratch.
    Thanked by 1eft94530
  • bumping for the feast