New Music at Colloquium
  • AOZ
    Posts: 369
    As has become custom, the Colloquium in Pittsburgh will feature a new music reading session on Saturday, June 26. If you have a piece of music you would like to submit for possible performance by the group at large at the session, please send it to newmusic@musicasacra.com in PDF format (limited to 15 pages) by May 15, 2010. Your submission will be published in the New Music Session 2010 packet. You must be a registered participant of the Colloquium in order to have your work included. There is a $20 submission fee, payable via paypal or by check to our programs office: CMAA Programs, 166 North Gay St., #19, Auburn, AL 36830.
  • francis
    Posts: 10,700
    I would like to submit a work, but am unable to attend. Are the rules absolute concerning attendance?
  • Francis, it may have something to do with how far tomatoes can be thrown. A composer's greatest fear.
  • JDE
    Posts: 588
    Caveat: There will be a tomato detector at the door.
  • JDE
    Posts: 588
    I would add in all seriousness that I have never encountered a more supportive group than the one I witnessed at Colloquium XIX. There was not the faintest whiff of dissatisfaction or snobbery.
  • francis
    Posts: 10,700
    Well, this composer is not afraid of any tomatoes. I got plenty of those from my professors and colleagues who thought the grand staff was old fashioned technology. I was just the "young and ignorant one" at that time so they thought and proclaimed.

    Before long, however, they abandoned their silly atonal mentality and concocted minimalism to make an excuse for writing one measure of hypnotic music and proclaiming it to be so profound that it can be repeated in every measure throughout the entire piece. Once that gimmick wore out and the music establishment rejected the 20th century composer wholesale, I just laughed and kept on composing serious music that I felt was for the glory of God.

    Just like the chaos that errupted in the Catholic church during those same years, chaos also plagued the art and music world. And just like the dogma of Catholic theology that is re-emerging unscathed so is the soundness of music theory, and the rules and dogma of excellent melody, counterpoint and harmony.

    Good music will never be stained by the rotten tomatoes that are hurled in mockery by fools.
  • AOZ
    Posts: 369
    Franics - Thanks for asking about the rules. They exist for two reasons: #1 - the size of the packet. #2, and probably more important -there is tremendous value added in having composers themselves at the sessions - not only to give the group valuable insight into the works being "premiered," (ok, sung by friends and colleagues), but there is something magical that happens for composers as well - hearing his or her works sung - a learning experience.
  • francis
    Posts: 10,700
    Thanks for the clarification. In my thinking, all the magic better be in the notes themselves and the rest of it better be in the voices that bring those notes to life. Wish I could be there! Give all my regards.
  • JDE
    Posts: 588
    The singers at the new music reading session were extremely supportive and even enthusiastic despite the heat and the long day they had already experienced. I did not mean to suggest that anyone would throw tomatoes at Francis. It was meant to be a lighthearted comment.

    My submission didn't make it into the book because i failed to follow the directions on where and how to submit (most definitely not the CMAA's fault.)

    There was a wide range of styles and textures and levels of difficulty in the music we read that day; what it all had in common was sacredness in intent. I suspect the other singers felt that as well. If there were any tomatoes there, they remained in the hurlers' pockets.
  • chonakchonak
    Posts: 9,176
    In the new-music sessions I've attended at colloquia, only a few pieces have been problematic, out of several dozen, and even they were welcomed kindly. A couple of the pieces were difficult to sight-sing; I think one was not really well-suited to the Catholic liturgy, though it might be a good concert piece; one or two had technical issues. In a couple of cases, I thought that the works submitted were too long for the occasion. But there are always pleasant discoveries in the session.
  • francis
    Posts: 10,700
    Are there recordings of the music session that I can hear? I know that can be touchy for the composers, but I would LOVE to hear all the comps.
  • Kathy
    Posts: 5,500
    Francis, they were all included on Carl Dierschow's page of recordings from the Colloquium: http://chant.dierschow.com/Colloquium/
  • francis
    Posts: 10,700
    Kathy

    Thanx so much. How did I miss this resource?!. I am going to listen to everything, but especially the new comps.
  • Carl DCarl D
    Posts: 992
    Notice that the recordings from 2008 are there as well - check out the instructions at the top of the page.

    I sure hope I can afford to come to Colloquium Dos Equis and capture more recordings!
  • francis
    Posts: 10,700
    thnx carl... listened to them all last night. very informative.
  • I was wondering...
    Would anyone be interested in an MR3 version of the Gloria I've composed that compliments Richard Proulx's MISA OECUMENICA, which doesn't have one in the original? In other words, something a tad more "Russian Orthodox" than Richard's SCG settings?
  • rey
    Posts: 9
    Wonderful recordings! I realise they all had the piano going with it though, which was a tad distracting at times - i reckon some of the pieces were actually meant to be sung a cappella?

    I'm quite interested in getting music read. But I'm curious about how this works. Is all the music simply sight-sung once? Do the composers/ conductors have any time to work with the singers on the piece?
  • don roy
    Posts: 306
    i submitted new compositions both at the 2008 and 2009 colloquiems. the piece for 2009 was a very flawed work in progress that was way difficult to read (my bad) also many had been in a sight read of difficult renaissance music just prior to this event so they were extremely tired.
    basically its just a run through. theres no time for more but i would have so loved to really hear what my piece sounded like with a bit more instruction (like i said it was way difficult to read)
    i would recommend a fairly accesable short work for good sight readers (the colloquiem participants were amazing in this regard)
    hearing your work sung so beautifully is an amazing experience that i recommend highly.
  • Rey, in answer to your question, whether or not a piece can be read through more than once depends on both the piece's difficulty and its length, as well as on how many other submissions the composer has made. A composer who, as Don suggests, turns in one reasonably short work is more likely to have the time for two run-throughs, and maybe even the spot-checking of certain sections, than a composer who submits two works. (Remember the 15-page limit!) As Don also mentions, it is for this session as it is in real life: legible, clean scores will always sound better faster!

    The use of the piano is a practical necessity, given the number of participants and (at least for the past two years in Chicago) the size of the auditorium. Certainly there are some pieces on which the piano is used only sparingly so as gently to correct pitches, if indeed it's needed at all.

    One of the highlights of the session is hearing composers talk about their pieces: their working method, their inspiration, the background of their craft. It's out hope that all composers attending the Colloquium will consider submitting a work!
  • RagueneauRagueneau
    Posts: 2,592
    An added bonus is the chance to hear the amazing David J. Hughes sight-read ---- really amazing !
  • You're much too kind, Jeff. As I've said before, I guess all those years of not practicing have paid off.

    Composers, ready your scores!