Ordinary Mass XVII : for Lent : Adapted to English
  • francisfrancis
    Posts: 8,345
    Here is another way to introduce chant during the Sundays of Lent without pressing the PEPs "Latin Penitential Turn-Off" button. This is a slavishly close adaption of the chant melody.

    Please note that in the Sanctus (Holy, Holy, Holy) in the word Hosanna the letter 'n' maintains the liquescent note.

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  • CharlesW
    Posts: 10,176
    Thanks. We are doing the Latin version during Lent, which has never caused a single complaint from anyone. But it's nice to have the English version stored away for when we need it.
  • francisfrancis
    Posts: 8,345
    This will be a big deal for the choir to learn.
  • francisfrancis
    Posts: 8,345
    This revision takes into account the ictus, so a few changes have been applied to the notation including doubling of quarter notes, the grouping of notes into the typical twos and threes (found in the Solemnes method). Since the groupings are now applied to the English translation, liberty, (very little, mind you) is taken to help apply the melody to the text in the most faithful way possible. I have applied the use of a 'phrase slur' to emphasize the proper breathing to the original melodies in the Latin.

    This version is also publishable as a Mass Card for the congregation. Print this on both sides of letter sized paper, then slice it in half.

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    NOTE : Some may ask: Why not just do this in Latin using chant notation? This is what I call a 'back door' method in introducing people to the chant without them knowing so. Instead of composing new music (which could very easily be done) with Latin texts, I use the reverse psychology. Set the ancient melody, using modern notation and the modern English translation. Let's bring them back to the Gregorian Chant in every way possible. This is just another way to slowly bring them in.
  • francisfrancis
    Posts: 8,345
    The file was corrupt. Now it is fixed.
  • May I suggest that you read, "The Ordinary in English: Anglican Plainchant Kyrials and the Sources" by John Boe. (Ph.D. Dissertation, Northwestern University, 1969)--and exhaustive comparative study of the adaptation of ordinary chants to English words. His study will help you in your work.
  • francisfrancis
    Posts: 8,345
    Yes. I will try to find it.
  • francisfrancis
    Posts: 8,345
    Bruce: Did you try chanting the above version out loud? Not the first one, as that was a version still in process, but the second one.
  • francisfrancis
    Posts: 8,345
    Here is one more revision which corrects the syntax of the phrase "earth are full" in the Sanctus.

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    The overarching slurs represent phrases (breathing), which I also tried to incorporate into the division of measures. The smaller slurs (typically under the notes), represent the ictus of the melody, and not necessarily the application of grouped notes over syllables. Therefore you will see some slurs where two syllables are applied. However, the effect is quite similar to the Latin.

    And please remember that the key signature does not mean it must be played at the specified pitch! This is still moveable DO. I chose the various keys because of the 'reach' of the chants involved. The Holy Holy Holy could be sung in D for instance as well as the Lamb of God.