upcoming hymnals
  • tdunbar
    Posts: 120
    I would like to think that the upcoming revision in the english order of mass might provide opportunities to improve hymnals in parishes that use hardcover hymnals. However, on second thought, it is precisely the biggest commercial publishers who would find updating easiest perhaps and trends there are not encouraging. For example, GIA says:


    Four GIA Hymnals Slated to Coincide with
    Implementation of the Revised Order of Mass

    Worship–Fourth Edition

    The tradition of the Worship hymnals began in 1971. Worship II and Worship–Third Edition followed in 1975 and 1986, respectively. Together, they account for the greatest number of GIA hymnals used in Catholic parishes in this country over those years, with hundreds of thousands of the latest edition still in use. It is fitting, then, that our newest top-of-the-line hymnal should be its fourth edition.

    Lots will be new! Unlike its two most recent predecessors, the fourth edition will be comprehensive, much in the style of GIA’s RitualSong. While it will include a substantial collection of the finest organ-based hymnody, it will also include the best-loved contemporary music, and shorter “world music” pieces; a significant amount of the core material will have Spanish translations. The single feature about which we are most enthusiastic, though, is its wide-range exploration of hymn texts by modern writers—those writing for today’s church. For immediate accessibility, a majority of these hymns will be matched with well-known, well-loved tunes.

    The five editors—Kelly Dobbs Mickus, senior editor, Robert Batastini, Fr. James Chepponis, Charles Gardner, and Fr. Ronald Krisman—have devoted a tremendous amount of energy and expertise to assembling an outstanding body of hymns matched to each Sunday of the three-year Lectionary. While these hymns will be distributed throughout the book according to thematic category, the Hymn of the Day calendar will point directly to an exceptionally appropriate hymn for each Sunday and solemnity of the church year, with tunes that are likely to be familiar.


    Of course, instead of thinking of that as moving Worship III toward RitualSong, perhaps some parishes that might have gotten RitualSong will get Worship IV instead.

    Anyway, I don't mean this topic to be about a GIA hymnal; but rather, how the upcoming revision will influence changes in parish hymnals/support materials.
  • francis
    Posts: 10,703
    We can hope and pray for better hymnals, but it doesn't look promising according to your post. Personally, I am banking on assembling our own with the pbeh offering and adding in other hymns and a body of chant.
  • No GIA or OCP hymnal is acceptable for use in Catholic parishes because of the debasement of the texts.
  • Earle
    Posts: 6
    As respects GIA and OCP: "Why am I not surprised
  • francis
    Posts: 10,703
    Sexless and textless - it's the way of the culture - up with pbeh and out with the riff-raff. I don't know if CMAA wants to be in the hymnal business (I think the emphasis should be chant), but if the chant was included in the same book with at least 400 hymns I think it would definitely raise some eyebrows and give the big three a run for the money.
  • GavinGavin
    Posts: 2,799
    That news release from GIA makes me physically ill.
  • Maureen
    Posts: 675
    "a significant amount of the core material will have Spanish translations"

    Bad news -- they won't actually translate the English, but just make stuff up.

    Good news -- they won't actually translate the English, but just make stuff up. :)
  • mjballoumjballou
    Posts: 993
    "...the Hymn of the Day calendar will point directly to an exceptionally appropriate hymn for each Sunday and solemnity of the church year, with tunes that are likely to be familiar."

    I just emitted a tiny shriek, then a sigh. This will go so well with Father's "theme of today's Mass" announcement. I'm going to lie down in a darkened room with a cloth on my brow.
  • Perhaps the publishers should include a life-time supply of little white bags for the pews, for the same reason that airlines include them in the seat-back pockets.
  • But, MJB, that particular index has always been present in the major GIA hymnals; no surprise there. But it, along with the publishers' seasonal shill sheats, still contravene the spirit and will of the law that the Propers are (in some fashion) the ideal texts to be sung at the processions.
  • BruceL
    Posts: 1,072
    It's no surprise to me that W-IV is going this way, what with the people editing, but why couldn't GIA have gone for similar content to WIII plus a metrical psalter style thing? It seems they should be able to read the signs of the times better...

    One thing rankles me with this announcement in particular: "The single feature about which we are most enthusiastic, though, is its wide-range exploration of hymn texts by modern writers—those writing for today’s church." So much for the timelessness of the Faith...who wants to bet there will be a zillion shallow, syrupy, faux-social-justice texts in there?

    I am still fairly bitter that GIA included the 1994 Grail Psalter in RitualSong; no offense to those who have those books (there are far worse hymnals), but that text is not fit for the Liturgy.
  • Kathy
    Posts: 5,500
    New hymns don't HAVE to be bad.
  • francis
    Posts: 10,703
    Kathy:

    They don't but 97% (and this number is very forgiving) of them usually are.
  • chonakchonak
    Posts: 9,176
    As BruceL said: GIA should be able to read the signs of the times better. They could probably sell quite a few hymnals if they'd make a book for conservative-leaning churches, whether they call it Worship IV or something else. English and Latin ordinaries, hymns with unaltered texts, some chant and some modern settings by Proulx and whoever else.
  • Well, so much for thinking that GIA would investigate its own roots (Gregorian Institute of America)! Now that I've returned from worshipping the great white porcelain god, and am able to breathe again, I find myself thrice beating my breast all the while moaning "why, why, why?" After 40 years, some of these people still insist that the Holy Sacrifice of the Mass is still about US......

    Although I'm sickened to death in my own work situation, I take comfort and delight in knowing that my students prefer to sing the chants of the Mass, and outstanding strophic hymnody, over "world-music" "the Love Round" and "Father, I Adore You", followed by "Gentile Woman".....

    Return, O Lord! How Long!
  • mjballoumjballou
    Posts: 993
    I forgot about those blasted indices in the GIA hymnals. In the OCP materials, you have to consult the special materials prepared for "those with binder power." I think it was the term "Hymn of the Day." I thought of Starbucks and the "Coffee of the Day" or the Soup of the Day in the school cafeteria.

    And yes, lorganiste, it's amazing how many people don't know that GIA was an acronym. They also control the rights for the music that The Grail did before all of its members became eco-feminists.
  • 'today's church'. Red flag warning!!!

    The theme idea is so barfy to me, clearly a gimmick for promoting the latest musical auction item.

    'those with binder power'
    MJ, your wit never disappoints!
  • francis
    Posts: 10,703
    mj...

    O...! I thought GIA was the earth goddess! (O right, that is spelled GAEA.) JK.
  • tdunbar
    Posts: 120
    back to the main topic..

    While I'd like the Gregorian Missal in the pews myself, saying "all GIA & OCP is unacceptable" is just foolish, given history at my parish. We have "Glory & Praise" now and so Worship IV would be quite an improvement from GP's narrowminded 70s pop. Any realistic better alternatives appreciated!
  • Has anyone used the Adoremus hymnals? I personally like that one, but would like to hear other opinions before I start seriously pestering our clergy to replace the Collegeville Hymnals we currently have in use (with marginally helpful Latin/English order of the mass taped to the insides of the covers). SEAN
  • francis
    Posts: 10,703
    I may be wrong, but in terms of content, Collegeville has 3-4 times more content than the Adoremus. In terms of quality translations, (I have never compared them) but I bet Adoremus is probably better at it.