PBEH Discussion: Praise to the Holiest in the Height
  • Kathy
    Posts: 5,299
    When a theologian is moved to write a hymn, something special happens. A hymn is an exercise in tender devotion, while a theologian, who has training in languages and discourse, is dedicated to religious truth. Bring them together and, if you're lucky, you might just come up with something this suitable:

    Praise to the Holiest in the height,
    And in the depth be praise;
    In all His words most wonderful,
    Most sure in all His ways.

    O loving wisdom of our God!
    When all was sin and shame,
    A second Adam to the fight
    And to the rescue came.

    O wisest love! that flesh and blood,
    Which did in Adam fail,
    Should strive afresh against the foe,
    Should strive and should prevail.

    And that a higher gift than grace
    Should flesh and blood refine,
    God’s Presence and His very Self,
    And Essence all divine.

    O generous love! that He, who smote,
    In Man for man the foe,
    The double agony in Man
    For man should undergo.

    And in the garden secretly,
    And on the Cross on high,
    Should teach His brethren, and inspire
    To suffer and to die.

    Praise to the Holiest in the height,
    And in the depth be praise;
    In all His words most wonderful,
    Most sure in all His ways.

    John Henry Cardinal Newman
  • Chrism
    Posts: 761
    Is there a standard tune for this?
  • Kathy
    Posts: 5,299
    Gerontius is the most common. But here's another nice one: http://www.oremus.org/hymnal/p/p101c.html
  • I prefer Sir R.R. Terry's tune "Newman". It is the 2nd tune in H-'40, and is the tuned paired with that text in most Catholic hymnals. I think as many of Terry's tunes as possible should be included.
  • I'm with Steve, but that's the first tune in my copy of H40. The 2nd is Gerontius by Dykes

    Donna
  • Oops! My hymnal is at Church and I'm at the office.
  • The accepted tune for a text often varies according to nation. In some countries of the Anglo-sphere, this excellent text is sung to Somerville's "Chorus Angelorum". In other places, "Richmond" is employed (and to good effect).

    Unfortunately, some of my favourite tunes by R.R. Terry are under copyright and thus far not available to this project.