Jeffrey Post
  • RagueneauRagueneau
    Posts: 2,592
    Jeffrey posted an amazing post on NLM.

    It will take a LOT to change the status quo. I think we are all so used to the status quo.

    The status quo means going to Mass and singing RANDOM hymns at the beginning and end of Mass.

    There is no sense of the special FEAST days.

    When you hear special, CAREFULLY chosen texts (like those in the Old Rite for the Feast of St. John the Disciple) how wonderful that is!

    Much better than random hymns.
  • There seem to have always been specific additional hymns for feast days, but they have been suppressed to make way for generic ecumenical Protestant hymns. This may be hard to understand, but in the 1950's it was a sin to attend a protestant church, Vatican Double One opened doors, it was cool to be catholic but sing protestant.
  • G
    Posts: 1,391
    There seem to have always been specific additional hymns for feast days, but they have been suppressed

    Can you talk a bit about that, Noel?

    Jeff O, did Jeff T have a post at TNLM?
    All I could seem to see were the photos of Monsignor G.....

    (Save the Liturgy, Save the World)
  • when i posted something else landed on top. oh well. is this what you mean?
  • RagueneauRagueneau
    Posts: 2,592
    yes
  • Chrism
    Posts: 809
    My understanding of the 1950's is that except for certain feasts which were customarily associated with certain hymns, most Sundays would have random hymns at the beginning and end of Mass. This is, anyway, our practice at the EF today. The hymns were theologically correct, indisputably Catholic--they made a special point to teach the doctrines the world found most controversial like the Immaculate Conception, the Real Presence of Christ in the Eucharist, even the Filioque clause. They were chosen from books given the Imprimatur and approved by the local ordinary. They were usually well-focused on the sacred mysteries or else on the liturgical season, proximate feast, the devotional month, or else were chosen from the Marian or general repertoire.

    At High Mass, the customary Processional hymn was followed by the Introit, except on Sundays, when it was followed by the Asperges, which was followed by the Introit while the priest changed out of his cope and into his vestments for Mass.