First Weekend at new parish... music lists
  • NihilNominisNihilNominis
    Posts: 848
    Sunday, July 17, 2022
    Old St Mary, Cincinnati, OH


    9.30am Mass in Latin
    Organist / Baritone (me) and Alto cantor

    Prelude: Cantilene, J.G. Rheinberger, from Organ Sonata 11, mvt. 2
    Proper: Graduale Romanum / Chants Abreges
    Ordinary: Mass XI, alternatim cantor / assembly (with organ)
    Offertory Motet: Perfice Gressus Meos, F.X. Witt
    Communion Motet: Ave Verum, G. Faure
    Hymn: Praise to the Holiest (BILLING)
    Postlude: Fughette in D minor, J.G. Rheinberger Op. 123b, No. 1

    11.30am Mass in German
    Organist / Vocalist (me)

    Eröffnung: Ein Haus voll Glorie
    Kyrie: Herr, erbarme dich unser, Leopold-Messe
    Gloria: Dir Gott im Himmel Preis und Ehr
    Sequenz: Gott ist gegenwärtig
    Gabenbereitung: Maria zu lieben
    Sanctus: Heilig ist Gott in Herrlichkeit
    Agnus Dei: O du Lamm Gottes
    Communion: Schönster Herr Jesu
    Schlußlied: Segne du Maria

    Voluntaries as at 9.30
  • SalieriSalieri
    Posts: 3,137
    If the Schlußlied accompanies the leaving-procession, should it be called the "Schlep lid"?
    Thanked by 1NihilNominis
  • davido
    Posts: 657
    Is Sequenz the psalm? Or is this a gradual or sequence hymn like the Lutherans?
    Thanked by 1NihilNominis
  • NihilNominisNihilNominis
    Posts: 848
    Sequence hymn, I feel like this place slid right from Tridentine Singmesse into MR1970 without much change.
    Thanked by 2Salieri CHGiffen
  • Davido,

    The German practice isn't what you're used to. Nihil will correct me if I get this round my neck, but the Sequence hymn comes before the Gospel or between the Gospel and the Sermon. There really isn't a parallel in other forms of the rite. (Germans have this inventive side, in case you haven't noticed.)
    Thanked by 1NihilNominis
  • StimsonInRehabStimsonInRehab
    Posts: 1,852
    Please keep up the music lists. I feel like a life looking into a candy shop.
  • tomjaw
    Posts: 2,425
    @CGZ Were the Proses (musically similar to sequences), that are found in liturgical books confined to Germany? (or what is now Germany). I am sure that 'The Liturgical Year, Gueranger" has proses that were used in France etc.

    As far as I understand these proses were sung after the Gospel, they did not appear in the Tradentine books, and so fell out of use. I presume the protestants took on the custom before the local rites in northern Europe fell out of use.
    Thanked by 1CHGiffen
  • NihilNominisNihilNominis
    Posts: 848
    Chris,

    Exactly right. Ours is before the Gospel. As I understand it, it comes from the way Germans had Low Mass with Chorales.

    tomjaw,

    I presume “Tradentine” is a typo, but how felicitous!
  • NihilNominisNihilNominis
    Posts: 848
    @StimsonInRehab

    Feel free to visit the candy shop anytime! Here’s next Sunday:

    9.30am Mass in Latin
    Organist / Baritone (me) and Soprano

    Prelude: BWV 545.2, Fugue in C Major
    Proper: Graduale Romanum / Chants Abreges
    Ordinary: Mass XI, alternatim cantor / assembly (with organ)
    Offertory Motet: Ave Maria a 2, J. G. Rheinberger, arr. Rossini
    Communion Motet: O Jesu Nomen Dulce from Kleine Geistliche Konzerte, H. Schutz, SWV 308
    Hymn: Daily, Daily Sing to Mary (ALLE TAGE SING UND SAGE)
    Postlude: BWV 545.1, Prelude in C Major

    11.30am German Mass
    Organist / Baritone (me)

    Prelude: Was Gott tut das ist wohlgetan, J.P. Kellner
    Eröffnung: Lobe den Herrn
    Kyrie: Herr, erbarme dich unser, Leopold-Messe
    Gloria: Dir Gott im Himmel Preis und Ehr
    Sequenz: Was Gott tut, das is wohlgetan (Strophen 1 und 4)
    Gabenbereitung: O Maria sei gegrüßt
    Sanctus: Heilig, Schubert
    Agnus Dei: O du Lamm Gottes
    Communion: Fest soll mein Taufbund
    Schlußlied: Nun danket alle Gott
    Postlude: Nun danket alle Gott, Marche triomphale, Sigfrid Karg-Elert op. 65, no. 59
    Thanked by 2CHGiffen tomjaw
  • Elmar
    Posts: 466
    Thanks Nihil for this information!
    What you list as "Sequenz" is usually called "Zwischengesang" = 'in-between-song' (i.e. between the readings) in Germany, 'tussenzang' in the Netherlands. Nowadays there is a strong movement (which not everyone sees as improvement though) to finally get the Responsorial Psalm there in its proper (sic!) place.

    Recently (May 25th) I read about the centenary of liturgy in German:
    100 Jahre volksliturgische Messe in Klosterneuburg - Die österreichischen Wurzeln der Liturgiereform where the 'Leopold-Messe' (by Vinzenz Goller) was first introduced as sung vernacular ordinary - before VII complementary to the Latin ordinary spoken by the priest.
    Thanked by 1NihilNominis
  • NihilNominisNihilNominis
    Posts: 848
    Thanks, Elmar! I inherited the terminology from my predecessors.

    To be clear: the Psalm is read between the first and second readings — the hymn is sung where the not-sung Alleluia is omitted.
    Thanked by 1Elmar
  • Elmar
    Posts: 466
    OK, then it makes sense to call this hymn "Sequenz".

    Fun fact: only in this century it became commonplace in Germany to read all Sunday readings, not just the first OR the second reading. Running gag that just in countries (of the reformation) who pressured for more scripture in the Novus Ordo Missae, lectures were omitted because they made the Mass so long, and especially St. Paul's epistles were considered to be hardly intellegible for 'normal' people. (Homilies about them anyone in order to explain them?).
    When the lectionary provides an option for a short version rading: always use it!
    So when I was young we had typically:
    "Eröffnung", 'chopped' (in 3) Kyrie, Gloria-Lied (as above), one reading, "Zwischengesang", spoken(!) Alleluia + verse (or completly omitted) before the Gospel. Not to forget: Credo-Lied!
    where the not-sung Alleluia is omitted
    Shame on those who omit the sung Alleluia!
  • SalieriSalieri
    Posts: 3,137
    (Considering how poorly many readers proclaim the lessons, especially at weddings and funerals where people insist on having family members read, it might be better to play an epistle sonata while everyone reads to themselves, and then have the Deacon/Priest proclaim the Gospel after the hymn or alleluia. (Purple or not; you decide.))
  • fcbfcb
    Posts: 312
    only in this century it became commonplace in Germany to read all Sunday readings, not just the first OR the second reading.


    That was my experience in the Flemish part of Belgium in the early 2000s. And it was usually Paul who got the axe.

    I do have to say that the best congregational singing by Catholics I have experienced was in Germany, where they still sang many of the hymn versions of the Ordinary.
    Thanked by 2NihilNominis Elmar
  • MatthewRoth
    Posts: 1,773
    Yes, we used those when I was in Austria, to my great annoyance, though in Salzburg and Vienna, the dioceses apparently tried (in vain, I think) to use the more accurate translations, at least at read Masses, and the great churches have Latin polyphonic and orchestral Masses so often that the contrast is, err, striking.

    I'm a huge fan of German hymnody, as much as I don't care for hymns and am an avowed Francophile (well, -phone, too) as it is.
  • ServiamScores
    Posts: 2,010
    I once referred to myself as a ‘Francophile’ and received a look of utter horror from a person who clearly did not know the meaning of the word and assumed it referred to something rather nefarious. Still makes me chuckle.
  • Elmar
    Posts: 466
    I do have to say that the best congregational singing by Catholics I have experienced was in Germany, where they still sang many of the hymn versions of the Ordinary.
    Which tells us that the dictum catholics can't sing doesn't apply to Germany - probably we are all Lutherans in our hearts who happened to end up with a catholic sovereign in 1648.
  • What a fascinating church, and the pastor's welcome to you in his newsletter sounds like they are welcoming you with open arms (and I hope that is the case!). "You had me" at the Rheinberger Cantilene, which I (being firstly a singer/flutist/conductor/chant nerd and only in case of emergency a very mediocre organist) have transcribed for flute and organ and so very much enjoy playing. May your time there be fruitful and long, or as the Byzantines sing, God grant you many years in health and happiness!
  • NihilNominisNihilNominis
    Posts: 848
    Thank you, Patricia! Indeed it has been like coming home.
    Thanked by 1ServiamScores
  • NihilNominisNihilNominis
    Posts: 848
    This weekend:

    Saturday, July 30

    Wedding Mass

    Preludes: Ad libitum, ending with Voluntary in A Re by Gibbons
    Processional 1: Air from Water Music, Handel (lovely transparent trio setting of this)
    Processional 2: Trumpet Tune in D Major, David Johnson
    Proper: Simplified English chant settings
    Mass Setting: ICEL Chants
    Psalm: Ostrowski, Ps. 145
    G.A.: Alleluia, Mode 6
    Offertory: Trio Sonata (improvised)
    Communion: For the Beauty of the Earth (DIX)
    Recessional: BWV 541 (complete)

    Sunday, July 31

    9.30am Mass in Latin
    Organ and Summer Volunteer Call Choir (first time!)

    Prelude: BWV 538.2 "Dorisch", Fugue
    Proper: Graduale Romanum, SATB setting of Offertory antiphon by Fr. Rossini
    Ordinary: Mass XI, alternatim cantor / assembly (with organ)
    Offertory Motet: Inviolata, 11th-cent. plainsong
    Communion Motet: O Esca Viatorum, Isaak / Bach
    Hymn: O Praise Ye the Lord (LAUDATE DOMINUM), w/ reharm v. 4 SMC
    Postlude: BWV 538.1 "Dorisch", Toccata

    11.30am German Mass
    Organist / Baritone (me)

    Prelude: Nun bitten wir den heiligen Geist, BuxWV 208 or 209
    Eröffnung: Befiehl du deine Wege
    Kyrie: Herr, erbarme dich unser, Leopold-Messe
    Gloria: Dir Gott im Himmel Preis und Ehr
    Sequenz: Nun bitten wir den heiligen Geist
    Gabenbereitung: Maria, breit den Mantel aus
    Sanctus: Heilig, Heilig, Heilig (nach dem greg. Choral)
    Agnus Dei: O du Lamm Gottes
    Communion: Der Heil der Welt, Herr Jesu Christ
    Schlußlied: Grosser Gott, Wir Loben Dich
    Postlude: BWV 538.1 "Dorisch", Toccata
    Thanked by 1CHGiffen