Taylor and Boody Op. 34 at Christ Episcopal, Staunton VA
  • CHGiffenCHGiffen
    Posts: 5,000
    Here is a 20 minute video that explores the remarkable stops (both by themselves and in combinations) of the T & B Op. 34 in at Christ Episcopal Church in Staunton, VA. It's a wonderful organ, and this sheds a lot of light on the genius of Taylor & Boody.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Rk-how8JBQI
  • francis
    Posts: 10,081
    wow... gorgeous instrument
    Thanked by 1CHGiffen
  • Schönbergian
    Posts: 1,063
    A truly authentic early-nineteenth-century English instrument in many ways, free from the excesses that Henry Willis and his ilk brought to English and American instruments. The beauty of each stop, especially the genuine Gambas, is astonishing.
    Thanked by 1CHGiffen
  • CHGiffenCHGiffen
    Posts: 5,000
    Indeed, Op. 34 is a gem. If you are ever in or near Staunton, it's well worth a visit - and also a visit to the Taylor & Boody factory nearby.
  • CharlesW
    Posts: 11,744
    free from the excesses that Henry Willis and his ilk brought to English and American instruments.


    I beg to differ. The T & B has its advantages but I tend to like those Willis "excesses" since I play quite a bit of music written for those instruments. I think the fact I play very little Baroque literature, except for French Baroque - a different category altogether - makes a difference. I play French heavily. I wonder how the T & B can support Anglican literature. To each his own.

    Granted, hearing an instrument live is always better than hearing a recording. Next time I am in the area I will stop in and listen.
    Thanked by 1ServiamScores
  • Schönbergian
    Posts: 1,063
    I don't see how Willis's overly smooth reeds, extremely high wind pressures, and idiosyncratic upperwork are necessary to interpret the Anglican repertoire. Organs by Ralph Downes and Thomas Lewis are among the most prized specimens of British organbuilding, and they handle the repertoire with aplomb despite not relying on those principles.

    This has more in common with an early nineteenth-century English sound than most organs in Britain today.
  • CharlesW
    Posts: 11,744
    If I were able to possess a favorite English instrument, it would be the one at Coventry Cathedral. I grew up with early to mid 20th century Mollers, earlier Hook & Hastings, and Schantz instruments which dominated my area. I must admit I enjoy reeds that can pop the nails out of the floorboards. Every now and then I hear an instrument that is far better than I imagined or heard on recordings. There is a Richards Fowkes in my area that I heard on live streams and thought it was awful. It is at the university and even some of the organ students refer to it as the queer-as-fowkes organ. I finally heard it live and was blown away. It has some very lovely French voices, among other things. A beautiful instrument. Maybe when I hear the T & B, I may feel the same.
  • CHGiffenCHGiffen
    Posts: 5,000
    I wonder how the T & B can support Anglican literature.

    Well, Op. 34 is in an Episcopal church with a solid Anglican music tradition.