How did the kyriales get their names?
  • Geremia
    Posts: 219

    How did the kyriales get their names?


    Ordinary Chants


    | | Name | Season | Mode | Century |
    |----|----------------------------|-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------|------|------------|
    | 1 | Lux et origo | In Paschal Time | 8 | 10 |
    | 2 | Kyrie fons bonitatis | For feasts of the I class. 1. | 3 | 10 |
    | 3 | Kyrie Deus sempiterne | For feasts of the I class. 2. | 4 | 11 |
    | 4 | Cunctipotens Genitor Deus | For feasts of the II class. 1. | 1 | 10 |
    | 5 | Kyrie magnæ Deus potentiæ | For feasts of the II class. 2. | 8 | 13 |
    | 6 | Kyrie Rex Genitor | For feasts of the II class. 3. | 7 | 10 |
    | 7 | Kyrie Rex splendens | For feasts of the II class. 4. | 8 | 10 |
    | 8 | De Angelis | For feasts of the II class. 5. | 5 | 15-16 |
    | 9 | Cum jubilo | For feasts of the Blessed Virgin. 1. | 1 | 12 |
    | 10 | Alme Pater | For feasts of the Blessed Virgin. 2. | 1 | 11 |
    | 11 | Orbis factor | For Sundays throughout the Year. | 1 | (10) 14-16 |
    | 12 | Pater cuncta | For feasts of the III class. 1. | 8 | 12 |
    | 13 | Stelliferi Conditor orbis | For feasts of the III class. 2. | 1 | 11 |
    | 14 | Jesu Redemptor | For feasts of the III class. 3. | 8 | 10 |
    | 15 | Dominator Deus | For commemorations and ferias of the Christmas season. | 4 | 11-13 |
    | 16 | — | For ferias throughout the Year. | 3 | 11-13 |
    | 17 | — | For the Sundays of Advent and Lent. | 1 | (10) 15-17 |
    | 18 | Deus Genitor alme | For the ferias of Advent and Lent as well as for Vigils, Ember Days, and Rogation Days. | 1 | (10) 15-17 |


    Chants “Ad Libitum


    | | Name | Mode | Century |
    |----|------------------------------|------|---------|
    | 1 | Clemens Rector | 1 | 10 |
    | 2 | Summe Deus | 1 | 11 |
    | 3 | Rector cosmi pie | 2 | 11 |
    | 4 | Kyrie altissime | 5 | 11 |
    | 5 | Conditor Kyrie omnium | 7 | 10 |
    | 6 | Te Christe Rex supplices | 8 | 10 |
    | 7 | Splendor æterne | 1 | 11 |
    | 8 | Firmator sancte | 6 | 13 |
    | 9 | O Pater excelse | 8 | 11 |
    | 10 | Orbis factor* | 1 | (10) |
    | 11 | Pater cunctasup† | 1 | 10 |

    *For Sundays throughout the year.
    †For the Sundays of Advent and Lent.


    hat-tip to Andrew Leach's Christianity StackExchange question
  • M. Jackson Osborn
    Posts: 8,158
    The names derive from the tropes that the chants were associated with for some hundreds of years. These tropes were disallowed by Trent.
    Thanked by 1Geremia
  • Geremia
    Posts: 219
    So those tropes had been added in, and Pope St. Pius V took them out with his revised missal?
  • MatthewRoth
    Posts: 1,524
    I didn't know this until now, but apparently, not all of the Kyries were troped originally even if they have a Latin name. De Angelis became popular for solemn votive Masses, such as that of the Angels suggested for Mondays. (This is where Mass VIII belongs…) The Kyrie for our Mass VIII got its trope later, it seems.

    Anyway, the only actual suppression of tropes is for the Gloria of our Mass IX, which is surprising, because basically anything could be troped. The missal contained a new rubric saying that the text is to be sung "even on feasts of the BMV," which wasn't removed until 1920, suggesting that by that time, tropes had finally died, finishing a process that took several centuries. (Sometimes I wish that the Canticum Salomanis blog was more precise with even approximate dates, but there you go.)

    and Bach knew them even in his day, adapted into German.
  • GerardH
    Posts: 272
    For examples, check the Kyriale from the Sarum Noted Missal as typeset by William Renwick.
  • tomjaw
    Posts: 2,292
    More on Tropes here,
    For the Propers
    For the Kyriale

    Tropen zum Kyrie im Graduale Romanum
    hg. von Anton Stingl jun., EOS Verlag Sankt Ottilien 2011
    http://www.beck-shop.de/fachbuch/leseprobe/9783830674689_Excerpt_001.pdf

    Tropen zum Gloria, Sanctus und Agnus Dei im Graduale Romanum
    hg. von Anton Stingl jun., EOS Verlag Sankt Ottilien 2012
    http://www.beck-shop.de/fachbuch/leseprobe/9783830675457_Excerpt_001.pdf
  • SalieriSalieri
    Posts: 3,001
    There is actually a trope for the Kyrie de Angelis, found in a 14th century Gradual in Rouen: Kyrie Rex aeterno. You can find it here: https://sicutincensum.wordpress.com/2018/01/29/trope-of-the-week-kyrie-de-angelis/

    So this chant is actually earlier (by one century) than is claimed by the Vatican/Solesmes editions, which dates it to the 15th-16th centuries.
    Thanked by 2tomjaw CHGiffen
  • tomjaw
    Posts: 2,292
    @Salieri
    Thanks, but I am still of the opinion that De angelis should only be sung on feasts of the Angels that are not doubles of the first class!
  • MatthewRoth
    Posts: 1,524
    Yeah, at best. We will soon be limiting it to more important votive Masses not of the Virgin and to minor feasts.

    Yes, but the trope does not begin “De Angelis,” and while that Kyrie apparently is much earlier than originally thought, the trope has been found in only one gradual from 1622, which means that it dates to at least the 17th century, but it’s hard to tell when the trope was added since there’s only one source at the moment. (I also linked to that post and tried to summarize it; copying and pasting seems a tad unjust.)
    Thanked by 1tomjaw
  • a_f_hawkins
    Posts: 2,973
    As noted at Canticum Salamonis there is an article by Gastoué at https://media.musicasacra.com/publications/caecilia/caecilia_v60n12_1933_12.pdf on the sources of the tunes and the assembling of the Missa de Angelis.