Introducing everyone involved in the liturgy
  • “Hello, today we celebrate the Fifth Sunday in Ordinary Time. I’m your cantor, Debbie. Our altar servers are Billy Bob and Mary Jo. Our readers are Jack and Jill, and our organist is Sister Susie.”

    Seriously, has anyone been at a Mass where the cantor/reader/whatever introduced everyone that serves a role in the Mass? Where did this originate?
    Thanked by 1ServiamScores
  • francis
    Posts: 10,145
    hahahaha... yea... unfortunately... here's is mine... this happens many times over and over and over...

    "I want to thank the readers, the cantor, organist, choir and musicians, the altar servers..." (hand clapping and applause from the congregation)...

    I won't tell you where it originated.
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  • Liam
    Posts: 4,690
    Not in decades, like the 1970s. And even then it was a brief spasm.
  • chonakchonak
    Posts: 8,965
    One day, at a parish in the next town, a deacon started the Mass by greeting the congregation. He named the laypeople in liturgical roles, and then he welcomed the priest celebrating the Mass, even though that priest lived in the rectory next door and was therefore more "at home" than the deacon was.
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  • Chonak, that one is new to me! Although I’ve experienced the same as the first two posts many (many) times.

    The thank you’s at the end of mass almost always come from visiting priests. I always find it so odd. Oh—and the bishop, whenever he comes. It always seems so gratuitous to me.
  • GambaGamba
    Posts: 495
    I have seen this in several northeastern parishes, but I am not too familiar with other regions. Thinking of all the churches I’ve played at in the last decade, I think probably half did something like “Welcome….! I am N your lector”, and went on to identify the celebrant, homilst, servers, and sometimes EMHCs.

    I do not know the origin. I could see the intention being to build community (hey! I’m new in town, but now at least I know the names of eight people in the parish; maybe we can be friends….)

    I’ve never really cared who is reading/singing; it matters much more to me that I can understand their proclamation of the text. Announcing the full names of the minor (<18) altar servers to hundreds of people seems off to me in today’s climate of child protection.
  • Gamba,

    At least one point of origin (there may be several which converge) is the idea that Mass is about us, and this is a community celebration, at least in part, of itself.
    Thanked by 1ServiamScores
  • CCoozeCCooze
    Posts: 1,259
    Our celebrant is always announced. That’s it (as far as names go, but we still get 5-15mins of announcements before Sunday Mass).
    Even then, I’m not completely sure of the reason. It’s incredibly easy to tell our priests apart, and considering the procession begins very soon after the announcement, most people will see him and not need to be told who he is at every Mass.
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  • @CatholicZ09 thankfully no
  • a_f_hawkins
    Posts: 3,155
    No, never.
  • SalieriSalieri
    Posts: 3,146
    The Liturgy of the Thank Yous is quite common among priests of a certain vintage, but thankfully it has almost died out. The introduction of liturgical ministers seems to be non-existent in my area: the most you get is the cantor announcing the Entrance Hymn, of course that's sometimes done badly, with a liturgically incorrect idea that the Entrance Hymn "welcomes the presider", though it seems like more places are correcting that: I suppose all it takes is one Assumption Mass where the cantor says, "Let us greet Fr. Smith as we sing 'Hail, Holy Queen'" to get the point across.
  • I confess we have a long litany of announcements at the beginning of mass (2 mins before as the bells roll) but they don’t include introductions of personnel.

    Good morning/evening,
    Welcome…
    If you’re a visitor, we are especially happy you’re here…
    Please silence all electronic devices…
    Restrooms /cry room at the back of church…
    Worship aids with mass music are available here…

    Please stand; “St. Michael the archangel…”

    *entrance hymn begins*
  • Liam
    Posts: 4,690
    "I suppose all it takes is one Assumption Mass where the cantor says, "Let us greet Fr. Smith as we sing 'Hail, Holy Queen'" to get the point across."

    I actually witnessed that once, decades ago, but even in my cantor and lector trainings in the 1980s, there was an emphatic direction that the Introductory Rites were not at all about greeting/welcoming the celebrant and any temptation to construe them as such was to be extirpated with extreme prejudice. Instead the purposes of the Introductory Rites as set forth in the-then GIRM were what was emphasized: "The purpose of these rites is that the faithful coming together take on the form of a community and prepare themselves to listen to God's Word and celebrate the Eucharist properly." This was the time of the advent of referring to the opening music as the Gathering Hymn.
  • CharlesW
    Posts: 11,757
    This was the time of the advent of referring to the opening music as the Gathering Hymn.


    My favorite was the scattering hymn at the end when I could watch that noxious assemblage sail off into the sunset.

  • WGS
    Posts: 284
    and are there any visitors from out of town?... and is anyone celebrating a birthday today?....and Father so-and-so is willing to celebrate a Mass for us this morning. All in favor?

    I don't recall my giving any sign of approval, but it seems the Mass proceeded somewhat as usual. (Yes, this all happened about 25 or 30 years ago. Still, it was quite memorable!)
  • At the church where I am, we've eliminated all announcements and the Introit begins at the bell. (We do a hymn when congregational singing is allowed, then the Introit as the altar is censed.)
  • My home parish has eliminated any announcements read by the cantor before Mass. As a cantor myself, I hated reading through the long list of announcements. Most of the time, the announcements ended with: “Please take home a copy of the bulletin with you as you leave church today, as it contains very important information.” Okay, why couldn’t I just say that instead of reading the entire bulletin to the congregation?

    And, @WGS, I have seen the whole “Do we have anniversaries, birthdays, visitors, etc.,” too, and I’m surprised that people reciprocate and stand up and let others clap for them. I could never.
    Thanked by 1CCooze
  • Most of the time, the announcements ended with: “Please take home a copy of the bulletin with you as you leave church today, as it contains very important information.” Okay, why couldn’t I just say that instead of reading the entire bulletin to the congregation?
    Amen.
  • tomjaw
    Posts: 2,452
    A priest I know, had appealed for singers and servers for Candlemas, I did not think we could split our choir to sing at two Masses, so had ignored the request. Three days before the feast my morning science lessons were moved... so on the morning I realised that I could sing at this priest's Mass and not at my normal parish where I had organised singers and servers several week ago... So 2 hours before Mass and procession, I arranged for another cantor to join me. The priest had noticed that a young man had turned up with a Liber 30mins before Mass, when he saw me appear 20mins before Mass he realised that he would have a the full works...

    Well after Mass and Marian Anthem, he turned and publicly thanked us! We have since had two e-mails thanking us!
  • matthewjmatthewj
    Posts: 2,683
    This was a common thing in the part of Canada where I grew up, but when I left (2007) it seemed to be dying out then.
  • Matthew,

    What was common in Canada?
    he turned and publicly thanked us!
    Most of the time, the announcements ended with: “Please take home a copy of the bulletin with you as you leave church today, as it contains very important information.” Okay, why couldn’t I just say that instead of reading the entire bulletin to the congregation?
  • Our celebrant is always announced. That’s it (as far as names go, but we still get 5-15mins of announcements before Sunday Mass).
    Even then, I’m not completely sure of the reason. It’s incredibly easy to tell our priests apart, and considering the procession begins very soon after the announcement, most people will see him and not need to be told who he is at every Mass.


    Most people won't need to be told who he is - and any new people who've turn up, they don't need to know anything anyway. Anyone who got introduced last week and can't quite remember his name, tough. Etc.

    Sometimes the people who are deeply involved really don't seem to care about anyone except existing club members.

    Thanked by 1CCooze