Novus Ordo as it should be done.
  • Don9of11Don9of11
    Posts: 521
    The Novus Ordo Mass in Latin that I grew up with at St. Mary's and then later when I sang in the choir (1977-2005) very rarely ever used chant, once in awhile we used the Missa de Angelis mass setting but not as a general rule. Our go to Latin mass setting was often the Mass in G by La Hache which was also sung by the congregation. The mass was never celebrated "Ad orientum", always the priest faced the people. The entrance and recessional hymns were always in the vernacular to allow for parishioners to sing with the choir. The responsorial psalms were generally recited except on special feast days (Christmas, Easter, etc.) where the choir would sing. The Offertory and Communion hymns were often Latin hymns but not chant. The Eucharistic prayer was chanted by the priest in Latin. We used the booklet attached of course today you would need to update it to 2010 translation.

    Now for the last 50 or 60 years Catholics like myself have been singing the mass settings, responsorial psalms, and hymns as part of the Liturgy and so I think this the best way forward.
    Thanked by 2CharlesW CHGiffen
  • davido
    Posts: 532
    Should it be done this way everywhere? No. That would entail “rigid uniformity.” (purple?)
    Should it be done this way somewhere? Yes. God deserves the best. And the best can be both an absolute and also relative to a time and place.

    What I love about the Papae Marcelli in the new mass is that it makes everyone stop and reflect, even more than in the old mass. It is a pure moment of praise and adoration, the best of our art offered to God without even the functionality of it accompanying or covering another liturgical action.
  • smvanroodesmvanroode
    Posts: 856
    Beautiful, but as an experienced master of ceremonies at a cathedral church, I noticed (from only watching the ritus initiales) that the bishop (msgr. Pell) is wearing the mitre when he shouldn't and all people are sitting during the Kyrie and Gloria when they are supposed to stand.

    There are other things, but my main point is: this is not exactly as the novus ordo should be done.

  • TCJ
    Posts: 782
    I agree. The Novus Ordo should be done. Ahem.

    End purple.
    Thanked by 1ServiamScores
  • CharlesW
    Posts: 11,373
    While beautiful, these examples are often put forth as what should be done - as if all had the resources and facilities to do it. They don't.
  • ServiamScores
    Posts: 1,097
    as if all had the resources and facilities to do it. They don't.

    This is so sad, and so true. I do believe in holding up the ideal, however, for imitation. But as with the "degrees of solemnity" discussions, I think its safe to say that this model could be imitated on a more modest scale and it would still stand in stark contrast to the overwhelming majority of masses offered today.
  • I noticed that the epistle was not sung.
    Is there a pattern and (irrational) reason that what is in the vernacular is only said?
    It sticks out like that sore thumb and breaks linguistic continuity to be jerking from one tongue to another.
    Choose one language and stay in it.
    Also, the Novus Ordo has three, not two, lessons
    This wasn't exactly the Novus Ordo, but, for the most part, it was nice.
    The choir and organist are admirable.
  • Also, the Novus Ordo has three, not two, lessons
    The linked video is a votive Mass. Do you have evidence that three readings are permitted, let alone required, at such a Mass?
    Thanked by 1tomjaw
  • SalieriSalieri
    Posts: 2,862
    Three readings are only on Sundays, Solemnities, and those Feasts which may replace a Sunday. Ferias, Memorials, Feasts, and Votives only have two readings.
  • "How many copes can we fit in one sanctuary?" the Oratorians ask themselves...
  • ServiamScores
    Posts: 1,097
    The more copes the better!
  • CHGiffenCHGiffen
    Posts: 4,744
    "How many copes can we fit in one sanctuary?" the Oratorians ask themselves...

    Perhaps they need a coping mechanism???
  • CharlesW
    Posts: 11,373
    I can cope with that.
  • The plainchant here is done very well.
  • Richard MixRichard Mix
    Posts: 2,400
    Quite beautiful, but "as it should be done" is a locution I hesitate to apply to a workday Agnus for the fraction with a polyphonic one for distribution (that might be a solution for the Fauré Requiem, come to think of it).
  • OraLabora
    Posts: 209
    I noticed that the epistle was not sung.
    Is there a pattern and (irrational) reason that what is in the vernacular is only said?


    No, because at the Abbey I'm associated with as oblate, the Propers and Ordinary are sung in Latin/Greek Gregorian chant, and the readings are all proclaimed in the vernacular (French in this case), and chanted. Every day of the week. The rest is also all in French plainchant. Only the homily (on Sundays and big solemnities only) is not chanted.

    It's kind of nice to be able understand the readings... I can read and sing Latin fluently but understanding it, not so much!

    Ora
  • @OraLabora

    What is your Abbey?
  • vansensei
    Posts: 176
    @OraLabora

    But they could chant the homily as well, non?

    Who-ev-er has the white Vol-vo, it's get-ting towed.
    R. Thanks be to God.