Anglican chant for Gradual Psalm (OT 18)
  • Richard MixRichard Mix
    Posts: 2,366
    Have any of you been using the freeze on congregational singing to sing the 'Responsorial' in directum? I'm so tired of Guimont that I spent time today to lay out some double chants.
  • M. Jackson Osborn
    Posts: 8,023
    Very ;nice!
    I would quibble with some of your pointing, but am happy to see you doing it.
    By the way, I don't think, I may be corrected, but I don't think that 'the psalm' must be sung responsorily.
    It may as well be sung antiphonally or, as here, in diectum.
    We sing it in directum with Anglican chant every week at Walsingham - except when we have the Palmer-Burgess gradual.

    And here is another idea -
    If you a required to sing the psalm responsorialy make up a simple melody for the congregation's responsory and have the choir sing the verses to Anglican chant.
    Thanked by 1CHGiffen
  • Richard MixRichard Mix
    Posts: 2,366
    Feel free; who doesn't love a good pointing quibble?

    A project I have on pause at the moment is to finish Responds that can be sung a cappella with the congregation for Advent, somewhat along the lines of one for OT 17C. Here's OT 19 B:
  • davido
    Posts: 506
    I used an Anglican chant for this week's psalm too. won't upload for some reason right now tho
  • chonakchonak
    Posts: 8,694
    If the file name contains spaces or punctuation marks (other than dashes, underscores, and one period), the forum software won't accept it.
  • davido
    Posts: 506
    the apostrophe in my name was the problem. thanks chonak
  • Richard MixRichard Mix
    Posts: 2,366
    There's something to be said for teaching pointing to singers: I can see what you're going for with "his strength / and the | wonders|" but my choir would waver at the second hyphen in gene-ra-tion.

    My "blessëd" for "blessèd" isn't strictly kosher; the dieresis should be reserved for one syllable to two notes.

    we will declare to the | gene- |ration · to | come: *

    would be more conventional than what I came up with above.
  • Richard MixRichard Mix
    Posts: 2,366
    Assumption, to Crotch in G; comments welcome!
  • Richard MixRichard Mix
    Posts: 2,366
    OT 21 B
  • BruceL
    Posts: 1,060
    On the Assumption one: vs. 2, I would change on "Rev" of reverance, giving a melisma to that particular syllable. It's not particularly idiomatic in Anglican chant to make a note change on a conjunction. In vs. 3, I'd keep "in" of "into" on the reciting chord, then shift everything over so that "king" is a melisma. Finally, you could make a case on "-out" of without being over the two cadential notes in the penultimate "measure".

    I love seeing the different solutions people make for these. Things were very wooden in the old days, but the work of the past 75 years has brought a lot more naturalness of speech, etc., in these.
    Thanked by 1Richard Mix
  • Richard MixRichard Mix
    Posts: 2,366
    Here's OT 24B: "walk", "land" and "living" immediately suggested a refrain, which in turn tempted me to go possibly a little too far!
    Thanked by 1CHGiffen
  • Richard MixRichard Mix
    Posts: 2,366
    OT 23, weening my singers to pointed text:
  • Jeffrey Quick
    Posts: 1,769
    The one time in a year that my crew has to do a RP is when we close out the parish 40 Hours. For awhile, we've been doing the psalm to a falsobordone. But we're still short of people for 4 parts, and English doesn't sit well in psalmtones...which is why Anglican chant developed to begin with. So we're going the AC route this year, and we'll see how it's received.
  • Richard MixRichard Mix
    Posts: 2,366
    I was surprised Sunday before last by how very easily my choir mastered the "Since by man came death" chant, given the difficulty last time we did Messiah Part Three. Hypotheses are 1) my explanation of enharmonic and diatonic semitones has had time to sink in; 2) the psalm text encourages horizontal thinking over belabored vertical tuning; 3) a tone lower ;-)

    Here are OT 25/28 & OT 26/27 for year B: