Sacris solemniis English translation
  • I cannot find the entire translation of Sacris solemniis that contains this translation of the penultimate verse. It is quoted in the Catholic Encyclopedia in the Sacris solemniis article, but the writer does not give the name of the translator. I may be missing something, but I cannot figure out who it is. I would very much like to use the entire English translation by this author. I am looking for the entire hymn Sacris solemniis in this particular translation. Any help is appreciated.

    Lo! the Angelic Bread
    Feedeth the sons of men:
    Figures and types are fled
    Never to come again.
    O what a wondrous thing!
    Lowly and poor are fed,
    Banqueting on their Lord and King.
  • Kathy
    Posts: 5,359
    Just to state the obvious, this is the "first verse" of the shortened version, Panis Angelicus.
  • Yes. We are printing both the Latin and the English in a Parish hymnal. We generally only sing the Latin, but it's nice to see a good poetic English version.
    Thanked by 1M. Jackson Osborn
  • Kathy
    Posts: 5,359
    At least that verse is in Matthew Britt's 1922 The Hymns of the Breviary and Missal. If you can find a hard or searchable copy, you may be able to track it down. I looked under Corpus Christi but Britt uses a different translation there.

    It's possible that this is going to end up being not the whole SS, perhaps, and instead just the PA verses.

  • At least that verse is in Matthew Britt's 1922 The Hymns of the Breviary and Missal. If you can find a hard or searchable copy, you may be able to track it down. I looked under Corpus Christi but Britt uses a different translation there.


    Kathy, I appreciate any leads. That is a nice collection. I think some will end up in our little booklets. But the copy of the 1922 version I found here: https://media.musicasacra.com/pdf/hymnsofbreviary.pdf does not have it; it is the "Thus Angels' Bread is made" version. Am I looking in the right place?
    Thanked by 1Kathy
  • GerardH
    Posts: 222
    @SteveOttomanyi It's in the introduction on pg. 30, where it too is quoting the Catholic Encyclopaedia. Perhaps it was written specifically for inclusion therein
  • LOL! Thank you, GerardH, I think you might be right. A wild goose chase this may be!
  • tomjaw
    Posts: 2,146
    From Britt,
    TRANSLATION, a cento based on the translation by J. D. Chambers. There are about fifteen translations, two of which are in the Annus Sanctus.
    So we have over 15 translations...
    From the other expert Connelly,
    The bread of angels becomes man's bread; the bread from heaven puts an end to the types. What marvellous happening is this; the poor, the servant, the lowly feeds upon his Lord.

    Bagshawe,
    By Bread of the Angels see man is now fed, All types find their end in that Heavenly Bread, And now upon earth, O most wonderful word, A slave, poor and little, man eateth his Lord !
    Aquinas Byrnes O.P.,
    The Bread of Angels! tis
    The bread for men decreed:
    The types shall end in this,
    Fulfilled in very deed:
    Himself the Master gave
    Most lovingly to feed
    The poor, the lowly, and the slave

    Caswall,
    Farewell to types ! Henceforth
    We feed on Angels' food :
    The slave—oh, wonder ! —eats the Flesh
    Of his Incarnate God !
    Julian Hymnology,
    Translations in C.U.: 1. Let us with hearts renewed. By E. Caswall. Lyra Catholica, 1849 ... In Caswalls Hys.andPoems, 1873 p.64, .it is altered to "Let old things pass away." This form of the text is in the Marquess of Bute's Roman Brev. tr. into English, 1879, and O. Shipley's Annus Sanctus, 1884
    At this our solemn Feast by R. F. Littledale, in the Antiphoner and Grail, 1880, and again in the Hymner 1882.
    Other translations Primer 1706, I Williams 1839, W. J. Blew 1852-55, F. Trappes 1865, J.D. Chambers 1852, J. Wallace 1874, and J.D. Aylward


    I need to go to work now, but have not found Neale's translation, and have not looked through St. John Henry Newman's book. N.B. All the above Translation are of the complete hymn.
  • tomjaw, thank you, and I saw that website, too. Clearly, it did not have what I was looking for. It was one of the first results in the Google search, which I did do.