"God Has Delivered Us," text for Easter or a pandemic's end
  • Grace and peace, everyone.

    Here's a new text, "God Has Delivered Us," written for RUSSIA by Aleksei Lvov, which most people know as one of the themes in Tchaikovsky's "1812 Overture." I wrote this for Easter, but I think it could work for celebrating the end of a pandemic as well. Note that there is a reference to the Cross in procession. Cannon solo optional.

    1. God has delivered us! Sing Alleluia!
    His wondrous mercies and righteousness sing;
    Sing with the saints and the angels of Heaven:
    Praise to our God, the Almighty King!

    2. God has delivered us! Praise to our Jesus!
    His holy Cross overturns death and shame;
    See how it shines forth in glorious procession,
    Sweet Tree Immortal that bears His Name!

    3. God has delivered us! Praise Him, O Mother!
    All Pharaoh's armies are drowned in the sea;
    Bells of Jerusalem sound to the nations
    Thy Son's magnificent victory!

    4. God has delivered us! Praise Him, St. Michael!
    Mighty archangel, how swift is Thy sword;
    Evil is vanquished, the skies are rejoicing,
    All at the will of our Sov'reign Lord!

    5. God has delivered us! Sing Alleluia!
    His wondrous mercies and righteousness sing;
    Sing with the saints and the angels of Heaven:
    Praise to our God, the Almighty King!

    (c) 2021 Anna Bendiksen
  • Very nice!

    Even though the cannon solo is optional, it may call for a Bombarde-ment. Both the 16 and 32 ft varieties are acceptable.
  • Liam
    Posts: 4,354
    My late father, who was not a musician, found himself amid parents of other high school musicians in a private chamber orchestra of which I was a member some decades ago. Most of the parents were themselves musicians, many quite skilled and privileged. (The principal second violinist, a Juilliard Prep student, had access to her family's Guarneri for concerts...) My father, an engineer who served in the U.S. Army Signal Corps in World War II (he started out in the Corps of Engineers, but was reassigned on a dime (new cord color on his cap one day and new reporting chain), as frequently happened during the war), came up with a talking point: he wasn't a musician, but would tune the rifling of artillery for use in the pieces like the Overture 1812. This fascinated other parents in intermission lobby conversation.