Alleluia, dulce carmen
  • Hello,

    I found this recording of the hymn "Alleluia, song of gladness" at Saint John Cantius: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZQC41MM8u_Y&t=39s

    Where can it's score be found, please?
    Thanked by 1M. Jackson Osborn
  • Very beautiful. No doubt emailing the music ministry at St. John Cantius with this link would yield results.

    I should mention that this is totally new to me; I've never heard of this but it is certainly very beautiful and an interesting tradition. I'd love to know more about it.
  • Here are scores on hymnary.org, although it appears SJC is singing an altered version of one of the older scores shown here: https://hymnary.org/text/alleluia_song_of_gladness_voice_of_joy_t
    Thanked by 1Jehan_Boutte
  • Many thanks!

    I should mention that this is totally new to me; I've never heard of this but it is certainly very beautiful and an interesting tradition. I'd love to know more about it.

    You mean the burial of the Alleluia? In many places in Europe, the custom was to bury a wooden sculpture of the Alleluia into a coffin or an altar (as here) after the First Vespers (or Compline) of Septuagesima Sunday.
  • Yes--I've now gone and done some digging and I've already asked my pastor if we can do this this year. Hopefully he agrees!
    Thanked by 1Jehan_Boutte
  • sdtalley3sdtalley3
    Posts: 162
    We have an Italian family that instead of burying the Alleluia, they make an effigy that they burn, naming it the "Alleluia Man"...Yes they are pyromaniacs, but hopefully this is not something that is customary to the Italian culture.
    Thanked by 1Jehan_Boutte
  • Usually, the "Alleluia" is then taken out of it's coffin on Easter morning and brought again in the church.
  • davido
    Posts: 383
    For parishes more accustomed to Breaking Bread etc, REGENT SQUARE works great with this hymn
  • The version on the link provided by Jehan is sung to the tune called Dulce carmen. It may be found at no.54 in The Hymnal 1940, and at no. 63 in The English Hymnal of 1906. In Anglicandom it is customarily sung on 'goodbye to alleluya Sunday', being the Sunday next before Septuagesima, or, if one doesn't observe the gesimas these days, the Sunday next before Ash Wednesday.

    I have been quite surprised that this ancient 'goodbye to alleluya' hymn is almost unknown amongst Catholics (at least American ones). There are several chant tunes associated with this hymn, which have been well received by many of my chant classes. I recommend it heartily as an annual custom - a final act of unfettered joy and anticipation before the spiritual rigours of Lent.

    I have long known about the custom of 'burying alleluya' but have never been in a parish in which it was done - though I have heard of some Anglican churches who do observe this charming tradition. I believe that it should be more widespread. Graphic and dramatic customs such as this were common fare for teaching and catechesis in the mediaeval era.
  • or, if one doesn't observe the gesimas these days, the Sunday next before Ash Wednesday.

    That is to say for many churches today, sadly.

    I have been to a monastery which took the Alleluia out of it's coffin on Easter morning, and then carried it to the altar while singing "Crucem sanctam subiit". This was great, though I was half-deaf at that time. ^^

    Apart from that, I confess I have fallen in love with this tune.
  • For anyone looking for original chants, the St. Bede foundation shared two plainchant versions here: https://societyofstbede.wordpress.com/2015/01/31/eve-of-septuagesima/

    I took the liberty of combining both pdfs into one and printing it double-sided for my choir. Here is that file too.
  • Here's also a new engraving of the hymn, based on the Hymnal 1940 version but transposed to G (my top end is weak, every little bit helps) and with one or two passing tones added.