Public Domain Sources for Music to be Played at Public Masses subject to Live Music Prohibitions?
  • rob
    Posts: 147
    Any suggestions, with permissions extending to live-streaming or other remote delivery to the faithful not physically present during Mass? It seems to me that it may be possible to expose the faithful to a wide range of music that might not otherwise find itself into their Parishes. But, might it be better not to attempt it given the governing norms (and technical considerations), except perhaps as a prelude/post-lude? On the other hand, I believe the US Archdiocese for the Armed Forces has had its own portable choir/organ -in-a-box for some time.
    If anyone has recordings they'd be willing be offer, with permissions, i'd certainly welcome them under such terms/conditions as may apply. FWIW, I've been told the prohibition will extend to singing by the faithful, so please not anything that might tempt them even so much as to hum, let alone to clap or to sway outside social distancing guidelines

    We're not public yet, but I understand it will happen soon. As always, thanks.

    Rob
  • JonathanKKJonathanKK
    Posts: 441
    In general, aren't there prohibitions against using recorded music at Mass? But I don't care whether technically there are or not; non-live Music should not be used at Mass. Period.
  • rob
    Posts: 147
    That's my understanding and inclination as well, sir. But, since I believe our guidelines are still under consideration I'd hope first to influence their formulation, with express approval by superior competent authority,ideally with a list of available resources.

    Rob
  • irishtenoririshtenor
    Posts: 1,125
    I found your message confusing, @rob. Could you perhaps ask another way? I'm not clear on what you're asking for.
  • rob
    Posts: 147
    Thanks, sir, I'll try: if our Bishop approves resumption of public Masses, prohibiting live music but allowing recorded music that does not promote public singing -- maybe purely instrumental -- then are there generally available resources that will allow us legally to incorporate their recorded music into the Mass (or outside the Mass, perhaps as a concert or prelude) and for remote delivery of the liturgy to those not physically present?

    If approved, and our Pastor is otherwise willing to use recorded music, 'm seeking to avoid negotiating multiple, individual permissions.

    And,, separately perhaps, why ought the Bishop disapprove the practice altogether?

    Might that be a bit better?
    Thanked by 1irishtenor
  • Jeffrey Quick
    Posts: 1,604
    If your bishop allows recorded music for a live mass, he's flouting Pius XII and previous tradition. That prohibition was never overridden by any of the V2 docs

    Now, livestreams might be different, given that when viewed asynchronicly, they are recordings themselves. This might be fit matter for a dubium. Since exceptions in the Church tend to become standard practice, I hope that nobody takes it up.... because there are any number of early music groups that can produce better liturgical music than most of us can, at less cost.
    Thanked by 2CHGiffen tomjaw
  • irishtenoririshtenor
    Posts: 1,125
    That's clearer, Rob, thank you.

    There shouldn't be recorded music during Mass. It's consistently prohibited in liturgical documents. If you're trying to avoid public singing, just play the organ. I would also suggest that a single cantor, perhaps masked, placed in the organ loft, perhaps singing into a microphone (or not), while facing away from the congregation wouldn't increase the risk markedly.

    If we're only talking about a streamed Mass, viewed on the Internet, that might be a slightly different story, even if I don't really think it's a good idea. If you're editing audio/video, you might be able to get away with this, though I'm afraid I don't have any resources from which you might draw these recordings for streamed Masses.
  • rob
    Posts: 147
    Thanks, all. This is most helpful. To be clear, I don't think our Bishop is necessarily considering recorded music during Mass, but there are many -- with the best intent, I believe -- questioning what appears to be a plan to prohibit live music. In their minds, it seems to open the possibility of "dead" music.