Introductions to Readings
  • ebullock
    Posts: 4
    My pastor is interested in doing short introductions to readings as allowed in the General Introduction to the Lectionary no. 15: "There may be concise introductions before the readings, especially the first. The style proper to such comments must be respected, that is, they must be simple, faithful to the text, brief, well prepared, and properly varied to suit the text they introduce."

    To be clear, he's not interested in the celebrant making remarks about the readings before the Liturgy of the Word (as I've seen more often, and is also permitted,) but lectors themselves reading pre-written introductions to readings immediately before the readings.

    I've been looking for a published resource of very brief introductions for this purpose, but haven't found anything. Does anyone know of such a resource? I don't think he's very interested in us writing our own.
  • a_f_hawkins
    Posts: 2,699
    I think GIRM indicates that this is a presidential role -
    GIRM 31. Likewise it is also for the Priest, in the exercise of his office of presiding over the gathered assembly, to offer certain explanations that are foreseen in the rite itself. ... He is permitted, furthermore, in a very few words, to give the faithful an introduction ... to the Liturgy of the Word (before the readings)
    I have occasionally heard a reader saying the intoductory note printed in red in the Missal before each reading, and consider this is a thoroughly bad idea.
  • bhcordovabhcordova
    Posts: 980
    The Sunday Missal from Catholic Books Publishing has a short intro to each reading. Also, the Workbook for Lectors, Gospel Readers, and Proclaimers of the Word by Liturgical Training Publications has similar information for each reading. Also, try the Universalis website and the Magnificat website.
  • smvanroodesmvanroode
    Posts: 845
    The Dutch bishops have published a wonderful resource for every Mass (Sundays, Solemnities, Feasts and daily Mass) with brief introductions to the Mass of the day (optional after the Sign of the Cross and Greeting). These allude to the readings of the day and make a connection with the celebration of the Eucharist. But, aside from the language, this may not be what you are looking for.

    In seminary, we learned how to make these short introductions to the readings ourselves. They should indeed be very brief, carefully prepared beforehand and lead people into the Liturgy of the Word, bringing the faithful into an attitude of attentive listening.

    An option is to build on the short (often Scriptural) sentence that is printed above each reading. For example "God has made Jesus both Lord and Christ." before the first reading next Sunday.

    Though the Priest is responsible for the monitiones, he may delegate it to someone else.
    GIL 42: The president is responsible for preparing the faithful for the liturgy of the word on occasion by means of introductions before the readings. (GIRM 31) These comments can help the assembled congregation toward a better hearing of the word of God, because they stir up an attitude of faith and good will. He may also carry out this responsibility through others, a deacon, for example, or a commentator. (GIRM 105b)
    Thanked by 1Elmar
  • smvanroodesmvanroode
    Posts: 845
    Fixing the links in bhcordova's post:

  • a_f_hawkins
    Posts: 2,699
    Again though, if delegated, it is not done from the ambo it is not the function of the one who proclaims the reading.
    GIRM 105 b. The commentator, who, if appropriate, provides the faithful briefly with explanations... In performing this function the commentator stands in a suitable place within sight of the faithful, but not at the ambo.
  • ebullock
    Posts: 4
    Thanks, bhcordova! The intros from the Sunday Missal are good, but I don't think they're quite intended for this; I think he wants something giving more specific context. We have the workbook, and he's not crazy about it, and things in there look a little long.

    Sharing an option suggested to me in another group, in case anyone is interested!

    Lector's notes
  • a_f_hawkins
    Posts: 2,699
    Thanks, I like the look of those Lector's notes.
    But I insist that it is very important for a proper understanding of the Mass that there should be no confusion of roles. There is a formal structure of authority, as vital in its way as that of, for example, the Senate of the USA. At Mass this is marked in various ways, apart from vestments the place from which someone is speaking serves to show this structure. As with the Senate, authority may be delegated but that is itself a formal process. That is why the GIRM has these explicit rules.
    Thanked by 1Elmar
  • smvanroode wrote:

    The Dutch bishops have published a wonderful resource for every Mass (Sundays, Solemnities, Feasts and daily Mass) with brief introductions to the Mass of the day (optional after the Sign of the Cross and Greeting). These allude to the readings of the day and make a connection with the celebration of the Eucharist. But, aside from the language, this may not be what you are looking for.

    In seminary, we learned how to make these short introductions to the readings ourselves. They should indeed be very brief, carefully prepared beforehand and lead people into the Liturgy of the Word, bringing the faithful into an attitude of attentive listening.


    I'd love to have all the bibliographical information about this book. Perhaps I can get it translated and published.

    Thanks,
    Paul
    Thanked by 1RevAMG
  • smvanroodesmvanroode
    Posts: 845
    Paul, the book is titled Verbum Domini and comes in three volumes:
    I, Sundays and Solemnities (400 pages, €49,90)
    II, Weekdays of Advent, Christmas Time, Lent and Easter Time (320 pages, €49,90)
    III, Weekdays of Ordinary Time (352 pages, €49,90)

    For some reason, these volumes don't have an ISBN. You can order them directly from the Dutch Liturgical Council (Nationale Raad voor Liturgie): https://rkliturgie.nl/contactformulier-bestellingen If you have any trouble ordering the volumes, I'm happy to help you out.

    Each entry contains a short introduction to the Mass of the day, invocations for the third option of the Penitential Act and petitions for the Universal Prayer. Below are pictures of the title pages and of the texts for the Fourth Sunday of Easter (Year A).
    4032 x 3024 - 2M
    3024 x 4032 - 2M
    3024 x 4032 - 2M
    3024 x 4032 - 2M
    Thanked by 2CHGiffen RevAMG