Italian Organ music query
  • ViolaViola
    Posts: 334
    A query for the organists on this forum.
    I have come across a direction Rip. OE on a piece of Italian organ music. I think Rip. = Ripieno which is a mixture stop (?) but I have no idea about OE.
    There is also GO which I guess means Great Organ.
    Please could someone enlighten me.
    Thanks!
  • Liam
    Posts: 3,868
    It might be for an "Organo Espressivo" division/manual, in distinction to the Great.

    https://issuu.com/klassiek.nl/docs/digital_booklet_fumagalli_organ_mus
    Thanked by 2irishtenor Viola
  • doneill
    Posts: 188
    "Ripieno" refers to the principal chorus, which on Italian organs can include various combinations. For more specific information, see Barbara Owen's The Registration of Baroque Organ Music. I don't know what "OE" would mean. Is this a French edition? "GO" in French music indicates the Grand Orgue, or Great in English. But there is no such thing on historic Italian organs; most of them were one manual. But if you're reading from something like Guilmant's editions, that would make more sense; just be aware that the indications are not historically accurate. If you let us know what the particular piece is, some of us here could be of more help.
    Thanked by 1Viola
  • ViolaViola
    Posts: 334
    Thanks for these helpful comments.
    It's the 'Albinoni' Adagio as edited/written/expanded, whatever, by Remo Giazotto. A friend of mine is conducting a performance of it next week, with orchestra and organ. This was written on the organ part.
    So I don't suppose the Barbara Owen book is relevant in this particular case, but I intend to read it anyway, thanks for the recommendation.
  • Liam
    Posts: 3,868
    The link I provided includes a description of what Organo Espressivo meant in Italian organ practice.
    Thanked by 1Viola
  • doneill
    Posts: 188
    Oh, that makes more sense, then. "Edited/written/expanded, whatever" is an apt description of that piece (others might call it "fraudulent"), and whatever it is was intended for use on a modern organ with an expressive division. Given that it is an orchestral piece, "ripieno" indicates the full orchestra, as opposed to the concertino passages, which doesn't necessarily affect organ registration.
    Thanked by 1Viola