What is the "closing hymn" called in Spanish?
  • Earl_GreyEarl_Grey
    Posts: 794
    Spanish Help: Since it doesn't appear in the GIRM, I'm guessing there is no official name, but what is the Recessional or Closing Hymn commonly called in Spanish? (in the USA) Google Translate gives me HIMNO DE FIN DE OFICIO when I type in "Recessional". Is that correct?
  • irishtenoririshtenor
    Posts: 1,060
    Himno de Salida
    Thanked by 2Earl_Grey MNadalin
  • SalieriSalieri
    Posts: 2,417
    Be careful that you don't accidentally type "Himno de Salada". Unless they are going to serve cheap tea at the coffee hour afterward.
  • Liam
    Posts: 3,756
    Example of captioned programs at this link:

    https://olsbrooklyn.com/weeklyhymns.html
    Thanked by 1Earl_Grey
  • Earl_GreyEarl_Grey
    Posts: 794
    I posted the question since I couldn't find any native speakers close at hand at the time, but have since consulted with someone who said:

    Canto final
    or
    Canto de salida

    Are canto and himno used interchangeably when describing church songs, or is there a distinction?

    For example, in English, song is more general and many of the contemporary songs sung at church are technically not hymns even if found in a "hymnal".
  • Liam
    Posts: 3,756
    I've heard canto more typically, but I can't say if my experience is typical. I am not aware of canto//hymno has become a shibboleth-level issue among Spanish-speaking liturgical folks the way song//hymn has in some parts of the liturgical Anglosphere.
  • CharlesW
    Posts: 10,005
    Be careful that you don't accidentally type "Himno de Salada". Unless they are going to serve cheap tea at the coffee hour afterward


    I guess "Ice Ice Baby" wouldn't go over too well.
  • In my experience, Canto de salida is used most commonly. I don't recall ever seeing Canto final.
    If the English speaking congregation has a distinct preference between song and hymn, it may or may not be picked up by the Spanish speaking congregation. Ask a few people you trust from that community if it makes a difference and why.
    Thanked by 1Earl_Grey
  • Since I always liked "Hymn After Mass" or "Recessional" instead of Closing Hymn or Sending Forth I'd suggest "himno despues de la misa"
  • GambaGamba
    Posts: 176
    “Canción Extraña.”
  • irishtenoririshtenor
    Posts: 1,060
    I am not a fluent Spanish speaker, but I'm competent and served a parish with a significant Spanish-speaking population and taught in a school that served 99% Latino children. I've got a reasonable amount of experience working in Spanish-language liturgical music.

    If I would say "chant" in English, I say "canto" in Spanish.
    If I would say "hymn" in English, I say "himno" in Spanish.
    If I would say "song" in English, I say "canción" in Spanish.

    I also think @OrganistRob320's suggestion of "himno despues de la misa" would be apt, even if it's a little wordy.
    Thanked by 1Earl_Grey
  • ronkrisman
    Posts: 1,324
    Anyone who will take the time to consult the Roman Missal will discover that "Ite, missa est... Deo gratias" is not the end of the Ordinary of Mass. There is an important rubric which follows that dialogue. So music either before or while the ministers recess is not "after Mass."

    To the point of this discussion, it's "Canto de Despedida."
    Thanked by 2tomjaw Earl_Grey
  • Earl_GreyEarl_Grey
    Posts: 794
    And then there's this tidbit from Sing to the Lord about timing the procession so that it concludes with the final stanza of the (optional) hymn.

    199. Although it is not necessary to sing a recessional hymn,166 when it is a custom, all may join in a hymn or song after the dismissal. When a closing song is used, the procession of ministers should be arranged in such a way that it finishes during the final stanza. At times, e.g., if there has been a song after Communion, it may be appropriate to choose an option other than congregational song for the recessional. Other options include a choral or instrumental piece or, particularly during Lent, silence.

    United States Conference of Catholic Bishops (USCCB). Sing to the Lord: Music in Divine Worship (Pastoral Liturgy Series Book 4) (p. 56). United States Conference of Catholic Bishops (USCCB). Kindle Edition.
  • Liam
    Posts: 3,756
    " When a closing song is used, the procession of ministers should be arranged in such a way that it finishes during the final stanza."

    The final stanza being . . . whenever the procession finishes. Of course. (sarcasm alert)
    Thanked by 2CharlesW Carol
  • SalieriSalieri
    Posts: 2,417
    "When a closing song is used, the procession of ministers should be arranged in such a way that it finishes during the final stanza."

    Yeah, like anyone's actually going to go through the trouble of trying to coordinate that? This is why I don't bother with the USCCB liturgy gurus too much--often they sound like desk-jokey 'experts' with no practical experience in an actual liturgical setting.
    Thanked by 2CharlesW Carol
  • Richard MixRichard Mix
    Posts: 1,839
    We've often had clergy who could manage it, lining the party up facing the altar and bowing at the end of the penultimate verse. Sometimes the crucifer leaves everybody else in the dust, though.

  • "When a closing song is used, the procession of ministers should be arranged in such a way that it finishes during the final stanza."

    Yeah, like anyone's actually going to go through the trouble of trying to coordinate that? This is why I don't bother with the USCCB liturgy gurus too much--often they sound like desk-jokey 'experts' with no practical experience in an actual liturgical setting.

    We did it that way every week—it wasn't hard... the priest followed along with (and sang) the final hymn, and then began the procession from the altar during the last stanza of the hymn. The entrance procession wouldn't start moving until after the first stanza was finished. Worked just fine. Of course, if you have a priest that hates music and is concerned about getting the parking lot cleared for the next liturgy, your results may vary...
    Thanked by 2Richard Mix Carol
  • chonakchonak
    Posts: 7,764
    Sometimes the crucifer leaves everybody else in the dust, though.

    Yeah, most of the guys (or gals) in that role need to be reminded of this Great Principle of Liturgy: "Efficiency is not a liturgical value."
  • Chonak,

    That there are gals in that role reminds us of another Great Principle of Liturgy:

    "That a thing is possible does not make it advisable"
  • chonakchonak
    Posts: 7,764
    Perhaps we can collect them in a thread at some point.
  • You mean the Great Principles of Liturgy? What a good idea.