Nick Gale
  • mahrt
    Posts: 512
    A leading British Catholic musician has died in a motor vehicle accident in London.

    Nick Gale, 39, died at the scene of a collision involving his motorcycle and a cement lorry in Kensington High Street, London, at 10am on Tuesday morning, according to Vatican Radio.

    The driver of the lorry was later interviewed by police but not arrested, Vatican Radio said.

    Mr Gale was born in 1975 and was educated at Belmont Abbey in Herefordshire. He went on to read music at Oxford University, where he was also an organ scholar.

    According to his friend Phil Andrews, writing for Vatican Radio, Mr Gale worked as a choral director in Britain and abroad. He was an honorary fellow and secretary of the Academy of St Cecilia in London.

    Mr Gale was also well known for leading choral workshops, particularly for Gregorian Chant, a love of which he developed during a period spent at the Abbey of Solesmes, France. He worked for 13 years as Master of the Music at the Catholic Metropolitan Cathedral of St George, Southwark, and also taught at London Oratory School.

    Several of his performances broadcast a number of times on BBC television and radio.
  • The collision actually happened in March 2015. Nick Gale had been Director of Music at St. George's Cathedral for 13 years.
    Thanked by 2tomjaw CHGiffen
  • mahrt
    Posts: 512
    Thanks, David; I failed to check the date of the news item on Catholic Herald.
    Thanked by 1tomjaw
  • tomjaw
    Posts: 1,883
    But it is good to remember former colleagues...

    Requiem in aeternum...
    Thanked by 1CHGiffen
  • CharlesW
    Posts: 10,590
    May his memory, and the memory of all deceased musicians, be eternal.
    Thanked by 1tomjaw
  • chonakchonak
    Posts: 8,349
    For a while in 2010, Nick wrote for Chant Cafe; his posts are still on-line.
  • tomjaw
    Posts: 1,883
    May his memory, and the memory of all deceased musicians, be eternal.


    We hope he is with the choirs of angels, and he will finally have a choir that can sing and process, and also have a choir that does not need to breathe. I wonder if the choirs of angels sing the chant as fast as he liked, and sing with out the usual short pauses for breath?
    Thanked by 1CHGiffen