"Raised speech"
  • In this video the musical expert shows how singing is "raised speech" by saying "crucify him" and then sing it or do it as "raised speech".
    Pontius Pilatius, he argues, did chant the "crucify him". So there seem to be a fine like between talking and sing (a continuum).
    Has anyone actually used this when teaching someone to sing? I would never advise anyone to go from talking to singing as a vocal exercice.
    Maybe it would work for the Priest chanting the Gospel but most of us sing the Kyriale which isnt really "raised speech" at all.
    What do you make of this?
    I agree that seeing a connection between talking and singing is very good but I dont see too much connection between "raised speech" and "normal singing". Not even the introduction to Pater noster the Priest sing at Mass is "raised speech".
    What do you make of this?

    https://youtube.com/watch?v=-mycF36oM8E
  • dad29
    Posts: 1,595
    In the contrary, I have often told my Forensics team (at appropriate passages) to 'semi-sing' their text--which works very well.

    It's often said that Chant is 'elevated speech.' Inter alia, that works to keep the pace moving along.
  • Semi-sing?
  • JoeM
    Posts: 19
    Elevated speech is what the Italians called the 'feigned' voice. It is a release of all undue pressure on the vocal organs and properly aligns and focuses the vowel. It is very simple to achieve but difficult for Americans because we speak with muscular reflexes that are opposite of correct singing. More about this on my web-pages:

    palestrinachoirschool.com
    Thanked by 1CeciliaJulia
  • You mentioned Bel Canto on your website but never Feigned voice.
    Where is the relationship between talking and singing even mentioned?
    And I would not say that Palestrina is that close to speaking.
    Your argument is bassically that certain accents/way of speaking can be close to singing?
    And thus it should be easier for People of those accents/way of speaking to sing?
  • davido
    Posts: 111
    Henrik, thats basically what it boils down to. Singing is prolonged speech. Elongate your vowels, put them on assigned pitch, and you have song.
    Having someone with a lot of bad singing habits “sing were they speak” can be a way to get them out of their habits - but only if their speaking voice is pretty naturally produced. If their speaking voice carries a lot of tension, then this won’t work.

    I personally have a lot of bad vocal habits in my speaking voice that I am constantly trying to overcome when singing.
    Thanked by 1JoeM
  • dad29
    Posts: 1,595
    Singing is prolonged speech.


    So when in public speaking, or recitation, prolonging a syllable or giving a few syllables pitch, is what I mean by 'semi-sing.'

    It's rather difficult to put across in pixels.
  • JoeM
    Posts: 19
    You mentioned Bel Canto on your website but never Feigned voice.


    It is on the page 'Texts of the Roman Liturgy'

    From my page:
    This distinctly different voice used for singing has also been called ‘voce di finte’ or ‘feigned’ voice by the Italians. Cornelius L. Reid in his book Bel Canto Principles and Practices writes:

    “In reality the ‘feigned’ voice is nothing more than an outgrowth of the falsetto, and is an adjustment of this register giving it a somewhat ‘edgy’ quality of tone.”[Reid, Cornelius L. Reid, Bel Canto Principles and Practices, (New York, NY, The Joseph Patelson Music House, 1971) 103]

    According to Reid this quality of voice is essential to perfecting vocal technique and uniting the registers of the head and chest voices:



    It's rather difficult to put across in pixels.


    That is the truth!!

    Brett manning, although he does not call it 'feigned voice,' gives a pretty good example of it here:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Mtp8qqo3qm8

    It is what the Italians call the 'il ponticello' or little bridge to carry the voice through the 'passaggio' uniting the two registers. Because the quality of the voice before the break is equal to the quality after, leaving no perception of a break in the voice.

  • JoeM
    Posts: 19
    Your argument is bassically that certain accents/way of speaking can be close to singing?


    I am saying the exact opposite of that. That accents and habits of speech , especially American English, inhibit correct singing. Take for example the video on your first post to the thread. Dr. Prowse is teaching solfege without giving even one example of a pure vowel. He also is clearly singing the text with his speaking voice and not elongated 'pure' vowels. It seems to me he has a misconception of the 'raised speaking.' All of his syllables are over phonated and do not communicate a beautifully sung tone.

    I attempt to communicate the concept of pure vowels and beautiful tone in my students while teaching solfege.