Discrepancy between Liber and Missale
  • Anne
    Posts: 3
    Can anyone explain the text discrepancy that occurs in the Extraordinary Form between the Liber Usualis and the Missale Romanum, in the Gradual for the Votive Mass of the Angels?

    Liber: In conspectu Angelorum psallam tibi, Domine Deus meus.
    Missale: In conspectu Angelorum psallam tibi: adorabo ad templum sanctum tuum, et confitebor nomini tuo.

    I have two Libers: a 1930 and a 1961. They agree with each other, and with the 1961 Graduale Romanum. The 1896 French Liber disagrees, and instead has the same text as the Missale.

    If we need to sing the Gradual with psalm tone (i.e. at a child's funeral), I do not know which text to use. Rossini is no help; he does not seem to have the Votive Mass of the Angels.
  • PLTT
    Posts: 68
    There are several discrepancies between the Graduale and the Missale - some preceding and some as a result of the Pian editions at the beginning of the 20th century. Many were removed in the various editions of the Missal issued in the first half of the 20th century but several remain.

    This is one of the discrepancies as a result of the introduction of the Vatican Gradual. The "solution" given by most rubricians is to follow the text of the 1961 Graduale in singing. The priest follows the text of the Missal in reading the text sotto voce.
  • igneusigneus
    Posts: 265
    The "solution" given by most rubricians


    There is nothing to solve for rubricists. Authentic (current official) edition of the graduale is to be observed in chant, regardless of eventual textual discrepancies with the missal.
  • JonathanKKJonathanKK
    Posts: 392
    By the way, Rossini notes that these discrepancies exist, and that he follows the text of the Graduale.

    Probably why your 1896 Liber disagrees with the other chant books you have on hand is that the Vatican Edition of the Graduale did not come out until 1908.

    The 1908 Graduale Romanum is important, because no new typical edition of the Graduale has been put out since, only additions, modifications, rearrangements.

    Thus, the chant that we sing today is essentially still taken from the Graduale 1908.
    Thanked by 3bhcordova Anne eft94530
  • Anne
    Posts: 3
    Thank you. It is helpful to know that the 1908 Graduale is the norm for chant, and to see Rossini's note about the discrepancies.
  • Fr. Fortescue, in his book on the Mass, explains that the Graduale generally follows the old "Itala" versions of the Bible, whereas the Missale follows the Vulgate (and later updates of it). Fr. Fortescue says one of the major reasons the Vulgate had a hard time spreading was because people were used to singing the old Itala versions.

    In terms of what text can be sung for Extraordinary Form, either text can be lawfully used.

    Indeed, some official chant books even started to use the 'Bea Psalter' (approved under Pius XII) but that didn't last too long. *

    - - -

    * There is disagreement as to whether the Pius XII psalter was ever mandatory.
  • igneusigneus
    Posts: 265
    @Dixit_Dominus_44

    Indeed, some official chant books even started to use the 'Bea Psalter' (approved under Pius XII) but that didn't last too long. *
    - - -
    * There is disagreement as to whether the Pius XII psalter was ever mandatory.


    I wrote my bachelor's thesis on the "Bea Psalter" (and the Neovulgate Psalter). It wasn't ever allowed to be used at Mass, the only exceptions being formularies created during Pius XII's pontificate (the new formulary for Assumption, reformed Holy Week). In Divine Office and rituale it hasn't ever been made mandatory, but since 1949 it was included in breviaries and other books as the default (and often only) Psalter version, so those willing to take the Vulgate option had to use an older breviary or purchase a supplement volume with Gallican Psalter.
    Thanked by 1JonathanKK
  • I wrote my bachelor's thesis on the "Bea Psalter" (and the Neovulgate Psalter). It wasn't ever allowed to be used at Mass, the only exceptions being formularies created during Pius XII's pontificate (the new formulary for Assumption, reformed Holy Week).


    Regarding whether it was "used at Mass" please cf. my earlier comments. Examples of it being included at Mass would include “the Queenship of Mary” added in the 1950s. I believe it is 31 May.

    In Divine Office and rituale it hasn't ever been made mandatory,


    This is an interesting question, and there is disagreement as to whether it was ever mandatory.
  • igneusigneus
    Posts: 265
    @Dixit_Dominus_44 ad "Queenship of Mary":
    ok, one more new (post-1945) Mass formulary I wasn't aware of, there may be even a few more. But concession to use the new Psalter version in "pre-existing" formularies, by, say, "updating" all the Psalm verses (psalm-toned and thus replaceable without breaking the music), has never been granted. (Anyone able to prove the opposite is most welcome to turn a good part of my thesis into ashes :) ). The widest concession ever, from 1947, allowed to use the Pianum "in all prayers, liturgical as well as non-liturgical, in recitation as well as song, (but only) of whole Psalms outside of the Mass" (AAS 1947, p. 508).

    Ad Pianum being made mandatory:
    let's put aside the ritual, which wasn't my primary object of interest. As for the Divine Office, interesting documents are the vota submitted in preparation of the Council: few demanded Pianum being made mandatory "at least in private recitation and in choir, when the Divine Office is being celebrated without chant", others demanded one Psalter version being made mandatory without opting for one specifically. Clearly, there was no one mandatory Psalter version at the time these vota were submitted, and sometimes the ambiguity was an issue.

    To my knowledge, there is no act of liturgical legislation making Pianum mandatory. (Again, at least theoretically, a great occasion [edit: "opportunity" is the right word] to turn part of my thesis into ashes. :) ) 1945 Pius XII, in his MP "In cotidianis precibus", allowed to use Pianum in the Divine Office. At this time it was printed as a separate volume to be used together with the breviary. The 1947 SRC decree quoted above extended the concession to other liturgical and non-liturgical functions, under the conditions listed. 1949 editio nova typica of the breviary was promulgated, containing Psalms in the Pian version (only exception being psalm Venite, given in both Pian version and in the ancient one, with a rubric explaining that "in solemn chant the traditional text is to be used"). However, it's promulgation decree explicitly says that this Psalter version isn't mandatory yet (nondum). The decision to make it mandatory was never made. Instead, it was made (only) a de facto standard version for the Divine Office by being printed in the breviary as default.

    (Sorry for the verbosity, "Psalterium Pianum" is one of my favourite topics.)
  • tomjaw
    Posts: 1,250
    Queenship is on the 31st in the '1962' calendar, (other similar feasts are/were celebrated on other days.
    And the Mass formulary of St. Pius X,...

    I have a 1957 Holy Week supplement (booklet) to be used with a pre-55 Liber with the deformations / mutations of the ancient Liturgies. It has the old texts and the Bea psalter side by side, and suggests that you could use either.

    Anyway this may amuse...

    http://liturgicalnotes.blogspot.com/2016/09/september-3-anno-domini-2116-family.html
    Thanked by 2igneus madorganist
  • rarty
    Posts: 93
    The FIUV position paper on the psalter lists the places in 1962 Missal/Gradual that use the Pian psalter (Appendix A).
    Thanked by 2tomjaw igneus