EF - how to play the Organ as everyone processes in
  • veromaryveromary
    Posts: 125
    I think this is what is known as a prelude, but not sure, as Prelude in my mind evokes peaceful music and the organ music as everyone processes in is usually a more Maestoso-ish sort.

    In the past I have played through an accompaniment to the Asperges like this
    http://www.ccwatershed.org/pdfs/6098-asperges-me-pdf-organ-organist-accompaniment-free/download/

    then to vary it we started singing a hymn instead, but now I've been asked to play something on the organ to better conform to what other Sung Latin Masses do.

    Looking through other posts, I must be the earliest beginner level, and the instrument at hand is a fancy electric piano with some Organ settings, so pedals are right out.

    Is there a recipe for chord progressions or something like that?
  • Veromary,

    Preludes come before something. Accompanying a Procession should be a majestic act. Play something suitable for the entry of the ministers of God into His Holy Temple for the supreme act of worship.
  • Chris is correct -
    A prelude comes before something - pre=before, ludus=play, hence, praeludium, prelude.
    An Interlude comes within something.
    A Postlude comes after something.

    And, it is important to note that a prelude doesn't necessarily have to be timid musical mush. It can be real live music, chosen for the character of the day's lectionary or propers. It may be meditative or jubilant, or anything in between - anything but elevator music.

    After the prelude comes the Procession, for which the music should be somewhat, if not definitely, majestic.
    Thanked by 1veromary
  • noel jones, aagonoel jones, aago
    Posts: 6,497
    In creating The Catholic Organist's Quarterly series over at www.sacredmusiclibrary.com, we came across useful music, such as is this, which Veromary, I believe perfectly answers your question and fulfills your need.
    What do you think about using this music, which was composed in Germany for that exact purpose.?
    You are welcome to post about this at Facebook The Catholic Organist's Page, where you would find yourself welcome.

    Thanked by 1veromary