Music for Divine Mercy Chaplet
  • Heath
    Posts: 810
    Where can I find an English chant setting of the chaplet? I've heard the traditional version they do on EWTN . . . where's the music?
  • chonakchonak
    Posts: 7,679
    The music appeared in the back of some booklets about the Divine Mercy devotion. If you contact the Shrine in Stockbridge, they can probably send you one.
  • I have the sheet music for the "chanted" setting you mention, Heath. But it is, in my estimation, a seriously flawed setting in many ways beyond the obvious style it emulates.
    I'm considering whether I can alot time to setting the chaplet myself before 2 Easter as I don't want to use either of the two EWTN versions. For the record, I actually think the sacropop version is more effective than the faux-chant version.
  • Heath
    Posts: 810
    Charles,

    Would you care to elaborate on your first paragraph? I don't have the music in front of me to analyze, but I'm loathe to bring something completely new in, as many of our constituents know at least parts of the EWTN setting, and would feel more comfortable with it.

    Tx,
    HM
  • Heath, I'm going to walk the wire of your question without a net, I don't have the score in front of me (or a frontal lobotomy!)
    Items about the ETWN "Chant setting" that bother me:
    *The antiphonal response "have mercy on us, and on the whole world..." that uses a repeating ascending minor third (at some portions in a higher than comfortable congregational tessitura) so syllabically forced on "MER..." and "US..." it deters me from even recognizing those phrases as even emulating the principles of good chant. It, to me, remniscent of a kind of Celtic affect.
    *The use of the minor second interval for "Holy God" that to my ears suggests a clear tonality of a raised 7th scale degree to what otherwise would be the tonic of a "minor" mode; I believe it implies essentially a harmonic minor scale relationship (I don't know if there's a "dominant" scale degree 5 that bolsters my recollection) which then implies a minor triadic tonality. That just doesn't fly from what I got at Chant Intensive. Now, Heath, I could be completely wrong about that and those other 49 brains from SD and the forum are welcomed to dispute my "take" on whether this is a valid criticism.
    However, I fully recognize that this chaplet setting and its composer are not required to be authentic or even evocative (as in "gregoriana.") It just sounds so ill-conceived at this point of the chaplet in particular, to me.
    *The shifts in "tonal centers" seem artificial from section to section.
    That's pretty much it from me. I'd gladly send you the information for obtaining the music if you're interested. But perhaps there's a "Ford" version out there that has not as yet received broadband attention. And like I say, I'm personally interested in setting the chaplet as well.
  • Gianni
    Posts: 1
    I found a very unique Divine Mercy CD. Check out www.inter-missions.com and listen to the demos. You wont be sorry. -G
  • francisfrancis
    Posts: 8,139
    I second Charles opinion. I always thought it was an inferior setting. Don't care for it at all.
  • Kathy
    Posts: 4,997
    I don't either, but what then? It's an extra-liturgical devotion to which the faithful are attached, heavily promoted by the last Pope.
  • RobertRobert
    Posts: 338
    I could be wrong, but I believe the setting is adapted from Polish religious folk song and is not meant to be in the Gregorian idiom--even if the music shows some chant influence, as much Eastern (to my ears) as Western.
  • Kathy
    Posts: 4,997
    I agree--some of it sounds like Russian chant, particularly the trisagion invocation at the end. However, I can't make any musical of the Eternal Father section.
  • Steve CollinsSteve Collins
    Posts: 1,003
    I have composed an accompaniment for this version of the Chaplet. Unfortunately, the melody is copyrighted. Maybe I should see about getting permission for my accompaniment version, then I can share it without consequence.

    Yes, it sounds more like Russian chant (of some period!). And the "Eternal Father" part was a bit tricky. But I am pleased with my version when I hear it.
  • mjballoumjballou
    Posts: 986
    Gosh, I must be the only musician who likes this. And I normally can't stand group devotions. I wrote it out a couple of years ago because the parish I was working for had been using the more "pop" arrangement. Email me and I'll send you a copy. While it's in Sibelius, I can PDF it.

    I prefer it unaccompanied and moving fairly quickly. And maybe the melody makes some sense to me because of my years in the Eastern Church. It probably is Polish folk style. The secret is not to start too high or the second decade will sound like praying chipmunks.
  • Kathy
    Posts: 4,997
    And not too low or the last part sounds like Russian basses.
  • mjballoumjballou
    Posts: 986
    'Scuz me, Katty - you no like ze rossian bases?
  • Steve CollinsSteve Collins
    Posts: 1,003
    I have just received a response about the copyright issue on the text/tune of the Chaplet. So long as I don't offer my work for sale, I am free to distribute it. I simply need to add the copyright text to each of my documents. I will do this over the next few days.

    I basically have three files:
    1 Text on one side, text with melody on the reverse.
    2 As above, but with Tudor English for the Prayers (notably the Apostle's Creed and Our Father) for use in Anglican use parishes.
    3 Organ accompaniment in a modal style suitable to either of the above.

    Anyone interested in receiving these in PDF format can email me privately.
  • ninaeng
    Posts: 9
    Where can I find music for the Divine Mercy Chaplet? (preferably with text)
  • ninaeng: You may give these a shot. (Didactic mp3s available there as well.)
  • Steve CollinsSteve Collins
    Posts: 1,003
    I have had some requests for my accompaniment file. With Divine Mercy Sunday approaching, let me try to post it here.

    Happy Eastertide.
  • Jscola30
    Posts: 116
    I found this once and made a transcription, (note I'm not looking to start a conversation on whether Medjugore is a true apparition) I would reccomend taking it a little faster than the recording.

    http://divinemercychant.excerptsofinri.com/

    Here's the EWTN http://mercysong.bigcartel.com/product/chaplet-of-divine-mercy-sheet-music


    Here's another one I've found, click where it says get a free copy http://www.haapala.com/sufferingservant/pr_sum_divinemercy.cfm
  • francisfrancis
    Posts: 8,139
    Nobody will know if the apparition is authentic until it has been thoroughly investigated. My concern (and a check remains in my mind) is that the rosary seems to have been reduced in importance by the chaplet. IMHO the rosary is far more indulgenced, efficacious, and infinitely more powerful than the chaplet devotion as has been put forth by many Popes and saints.
  • CharlesW
    Posts: 9,891
    Nobody knows if any apparitions are authentic, and our faith doesn't rest on any of them. I think the fact that Divine Mercy was a Polish apparition, believed in by a Polish pope, is what has caused it to be widespread. In any event, thank you Steve Collins for the accompaniment file.
  • Beth
    Posts: 53
    Has anyone read St. Faustina's Diary?
    my two cents:
    We use the chant type setting here and it's worked out just fine. One of the reasons we, have strong smart singers to lead. My dentist is a big fan of the Divine Mercy and regularly plays the cd's while he's working on teeth.
    I had to sit thru the sacro-pop version while getting a filling done. I just remember thinking to my self how indulgent it sounded especially when the singers took scoops and sways to and from notes in the usual style. This is a highly individualized way of singing and not group friendly. Also, I had a beef with the text accents. The music was clearly the most important thing in the setting and not highlighting words of importance.
    First and foremost as someone has said previously it is a prayer and devotion.
  • ninaeng
    Posts: 9
    As part of a girlscout silver award project, we got these really neat Divine Mercy Books (The Divine Mercy: Message and Devotion) and the book has lots of excerpts from St. Faustina's Diary. It's a really cool compilation, but no I haven't read the entire thing.
  • Beth
    Posts: 53
    Great! The whole diary is rather long, it's good for picking out small passages at a time, although i do know someone who has read it cover to cover.
  • Steve CollinsSteve Collins
    Posts: 1,003
    Here is my other file, in its latest version that includes the Copyright acknowledgement. As long as it's shared and not sold, it's free to use. I set it up to be printed on 8.5x11 card-stock and cut in half.

    Happy Eastertide.
  • CharlesW
    Posts: 9,891
    I have read the diary, and still am not much of an apparition fan. I know one dear lady who will get in her car and go cross-country upon hearing a rumor that Mary has appeared on a cereal box. I tend to view apparitions like tales of, "long ago, in a land far away..." They add nothing to what the church already teaches. I am also reminded of the scripture passage when Christ said, "if you hear I am in the desert, don't go." That's clear enough that even I can understand it. But again, thank you Steve Collins for making your work available to us.
  • Beth
    Posts: 53
    For me, it's not about the apparition, it's the message. Jesus' mercy plain and simple. The graces received from that day are huge!
  • ninaeng
    Posts: 9
    Thanks Steve! I'm so happy that the one you had was the tune that I needed. Everytime I go onto websites, they tend to have this other tune...I'm not sure which one is the official one, but thanks a lot!
  • So glad to find this thread!

    MJ, Might I have a copy of your transcription? I'm curious if you use stems. My eyes go nuts reading all the eighth notes, otherwise I'd use Steve's admirable handout.

    I don't really like this chant-like setting, I admit. The oddity of setting English to thoroughly eastern melodic fragments doesn't delight me a ton. But... we're starting to pray it with our boys and I want them to be able to plug into devotional life outside our family. The pop version, on paper, works a little better with the text. I can see where a comp prof would prefer it... but oh, the style is quite foreign to group singing. IMHO, it does not work well unless one is a Life Teen Diva singing in the shower.
  • I like the chant setting a whole lot and spent a lot of time trying to re-find the video (can't remember where I found it; I'd have to look again).