Detroit Beatification
  • G
    Posts: 1,381
    Tuned in a bit late to the Beatification Mass for Fr Solanus Casey.
    The Gloria began, and I had to turn it off.
    I know there are places in the archdiocese with good music programs - why do "stadium Masses," more often than not utilize horrid settings of the ordinary?
    This was unfamiliar, but was right up there with the My Little Pony Mass, and actually worse than he default setting from a decade ago.
    Its discouraging.
    (Save the Liturgy, Save the World)
  • Thanks for the reminder, watching now.
  • "Blessed" Father Solanus Casey ....... Congratulations Detroit
  • cmb
    Posts: 55
    Strange that the worship aid on the website only has the titles to the hymns and ordinary. Never seen that before.
  • melofluentmelofluent
    Posts: 4,158
    G (my dearest)
    It was hodge-podge. That is SOP for these sorts of celebrations.
    The setting of the Glory was Ed Bolduc's "St. Ann Mass." I thought it fare'd better than the Proulx acclamations, actually.
    The first half (LoWord roughly) was more palatable. Psalm was quite moving.
    Choir, organ/piano, orchestra- excellent quality.
    Second half languished with the usual suspects: Proulx's gebrauchmuzick, Moore's gospel-ized "Taste and see", morphing into its doppelganger "Ang katewan ni Kisto" to Hurd's "Pan de Vida" followed by the ubiquitous "Gift of Finest Wheat." That was interminable.
    It was, ahem, a stadium liturgy. Kudos to the performers, particularly female cantor, (Save for the Teddy Pendergrass ejaculations.)
    Thanked by 1M. Jackson Osborn
  • G - your too kind. All I could think of was sac-cro pop, stage muzak and boom chic cha chic cha boom boom. I turned the channel; looking for a REAL Mass.
    Thanked by 1M. Jackson Osborn
  • RevAMG
    Posts: 116
    Worship aid/program can be found here.
    Thanked by 1Choirparts
  • Maureen
    Posts: 628
    Blessed Solanus Casey was a musician (albeit he wasn't as good at song and fiddle as his enthusiasm for it), so it was a shame they didn't do better by him on the music.

    OTOH, there was a comment in one news story that they were having music and prayers in Spanish, Vietnamese, Tagalog, and Chaldean; but somebody from the archdiocese proudly said that none of the Mass or the music would be in Latin, because the beatus "failed Latin" at the seminary. (I don't remember who said it, but I'm sure it was a liturgist.)

    He didn't get top marks in Spanish or Vietnamese, either....

    And despite the presence of 300 members of his family, many direct from Ireland, there wasn't any nod to his own ethnic heritage. If you're going to do this kind of ethnicization (which would be better done before Mass, as a devotional thing, and which should be done carefully, to avoid dividing the Church Universal), you shouldn't be doing it this stupidly.

    The sad truth is that Blessed Solanus Casey probably knew more Latin than a lot of priests nowadays do. He surely knew and loved a lot of songs and sacred music in Latin. But even after the man is with the Lord, it seems that some of his superiors still have the urge to mess with him and make his life difficult.

    Blessed Solanus Casey, patient sufferer and worker of miracles, pray for us!
  • Maureen
    Posts: 628
    Looked at the worship aid. Could have been worse.

    There was one nod to Irish heritage: an instrumental called the "Glendalough Theme," written long after Bl. Casey's death, by Fr. Liam Lawton. It's pleasant and innocuous enough, but it's got nothing to do with the beatus himself or the tunes he liked or knew. (It also meant paying royalties on the archdiocese's or Capuchin order's dime, so obviously nobody was thinking about saving money for the use of the poor. Not the biggest consideration, but when you've got public domain choices that make more sense....)

    I found the quote. It was Edward Foley, a Capuchin friar from Chicago (not Detroit) who was put in charge of putting together the Mass, and who also helped design new stuff for the Solanus Center in Detroit, where Blessed Solanus' tomb has been since 1987.

    He's stationed at the Catholic Theological Union. There he serves as the Duns Scotus Professor of Spirituality, and the Professor of Liturgy and Music. He's also Director of the Ecumenical Doctor of Ministry Program.

    At the Solanus Center, where all kinds of freaking big miracles to the glory of Christ have taken place, he proudly says they have shoehorned in symbols of Muslim, Hindu, and Protestant religion. Yup, he really really likes messing with the beatus. Good thing Bl. Casey's not the smite-y kind of Irish saint, because this Foley'd be perfect for a medieval legend of why you don't mess with miracleworkers' tombs. (Obviously he's not a medievalist.)

    So Foley was quoted in a story about the Solanus Center:

    -----------------------------------------

    "Edward Foley, a Capuchin friar who is coordinating Saturday's liturgy and chaired the committee that designed the Solanus Casey Center, said Casey's simple and prayerful personality will be reflected in the beatification ceremonies.

    The center is "elegant, but not flashy," like the Saturday mass and ceremonies will be.

    "We want it to be rich and full, but not presumptuous," said Foley, who teaches at the Catholic Theological Union in Chicago. "He was a very simple guy. He answered the door. ... We tried to choose music that's very accessible."

    The services will be in English, Vietnamese, Chaldean, Tagalog, and Spanish, reflecting the multicultural makeup of the Archdiocese of Detroit, which oversees 1.3 million Catholics in southeastern Michigan. The center contains statues and symbols from not only Catholic backgrounds, but African-American, Protestant, Japanese, and Muslim activists or traditions, among others.

    There will be no use of the Latin language in the Saturday ceremonies, said Foley, noting that Father Solanus, of Irish descent, "failed his Latin exams."

    ---------------------

    So yeah, in some quarters there's still no self-hate like Irish-American Catholic self-hate. Argh.

    Thanked by 1CharlesW
  • Maureen
    Posts: 628
    For the interested, the Beatification Mass will be restreamed on the Catholic Television Network of Detroit.

    Tuesday, November 21st at 8pm

    Wednesday, November 22nd at 12:30pm

    The really good thing is that the Archdiocese was running a huge confession opportunity upstairs behind the seats in Ford Field, so thousands of people got their sins forgiven. So not everybody was messing with Bl. Solanus Casey!
  • CharlesW
    Posts: 9,284
    Foley? Nuff said.
  • ronkrisman
    Posts: 1,292
    Regarding the point about paying royalties for the "Glendalough Theme," I don't think so. First, there are no performance royalties for church services, as there are when a radio station plays copyrighted music. Second, most copyright owners allow free one-time printing of their copyrighted materials (as the program booklet would be). The only royalties involved would be for the purchase of octavos for the choir. As I understand it, "Glendalough Theme" is instrumental. Some money may have exchanged hands for the purchase or rental of the orchestral score and parts, but the publisher may have waved that.
    Thanked by 1Choirparts
  • Maureen
    Posts: 628
    Well, cheap is good. :)

    But it's still kinda pointless re: Casey, albeit flattering re: Lawton.

    I was thinking about this further, and I realized that they missed out on a good opportunity. Fr. Solanus was given his religious name as a reference to the Franciscan St. Francis Solano or Solanus, who played violin and other instruments, composed a lot of music, and was a great evangelist and miracleworker. St. Francis Solano was Spanish. He composed his sacred music for use in the Americas, where he evangelized. And obviously Blessed Solanus must have had a devotion to St. Francis Solanus. So why wouldn't a Franciscan want to draw a line between two other great Franciscans, and also provide the Mass with all the dignity you should have and all the multiculturalism they wanted?

    Surely Foley would know about these people?

    I also noticed that none of Blessed Solanus' own little songs or poems were included. I mean, he wasn't a great songwriter, but his stuff was serviceable. Better than a couple of the things that were used.

    Shrug. Nobody puts me in charge of these things, and it could have been worse. But when you have a once in a lifetime chance to do something beautiful and holy, surely you would want to put some appropriate oomph into it.
  • chonakchonak
    Posts: 7,279
    Does anyone know whether a performance royalty might be required when a church service is broadcast?
  • Yes, a license fee is usually required ig something is broadcast, sreamed or recorded. The performance exemption only applied to playing in the service itself not to these innovations.
  • melofluentmelofluent
    Posts: 4,158
    But it's still kinda pointless re: Casey, albeit flattering re: Lawton.

    How is a beatification Mass differentiated from a Requiem or Mass of Christian Burial? In other words, is it to memorialize the deceased or to edify the faithful towards redemptive lives?
    That said, the Lawton was well-performed and unobtrusive, unlike all four of the Communion selections.
  • KyleM18
    Posts: 139
    They really used Mass of St. Ann? Why...? Why use a pop-rock-styled Ordinary with orchestra?
  • ...somebody from the archdiocese proudly said that none of the Mass or the music would be in Latin, because the beatus "failed Latin" at the seminary.


    Except for the fact that Cardinal Amato read the apostolic letter in Latin...just sayin'
    Thanked by 2chonak Choirparts
  • melofluentmelofluent
    Posts: 4,158
    Kyle, in a cafeteria of safe choices presumptively designed to "give the people what they (we) want," I felt that the Bolduc Glory proved one of the more successful choices. I ascribe that simply to performance practice: the orchestra, choir and cantor (the soprano particularly) rendered it quite persuasively. Perhaps because of all the selections, it has a built-in "arena factor."
    But you bring up a great ancillary point- the musical forces were quite above par for these sorts of tele-events. So why not go full tilt towards truly beautiful and moving repertoire. Why not do, for example, the Vierne Mass instead of the pedestrian ordinaries they cherry picked?
    I must say I was relieved that, at least, Heritage Mass was not on the docket.
  • Capuchin friar checking in here. It was beautiful to be in there with 70,000 Catholics praising God for Blessed Solanus. Absolutely stunning.

    Music-wise? I think melofluent hit it on the head.
    Thanked by 1melofluent
  • Ooo...and might I throw this into the pot while we're on the topic? https://forum.musicasacra.com/forum/discussion/15512/mass-in-honor-of-fr.-solanus-casey
  • KARU27
    Posts: 87
    I can't help wondering if "stadium Masses" were a thing before Vatican II? Did people not see the need for tens of thousands of people at Mass together? Is there a value in it?
  • G
    Posts: 1,381
    stationed at the Catholic Theological Union

    Doesn't that say it all.
    I think he may have been the speaker I heard of who told his audience that "since the Ascension, Christ has no body here on earth but yours"
    (Save the Liturgy, Save the World)
  • chonakchonak
    Posts: 7,279
    That line has been widely repeated, and if it's applied broadly, it's obviously wrong. But, if I remember right, the original version of that line came from a book by a French priest. He was meditating on the priest's role in the Mass, so it makes more sense in that context.
  • Old issues of Caecilia report on many "mass Mass events".
    Thanked by 1KARU27
  • KARU27
    Posts: 87
    "Was it stadium Mass in 18th century Russia?"
    Thanked by 1CharlesW
  • CharlesW
    Posts: 9,284
    It was not!
    Thanked by 1M. Jackson Osborn
  • The Beatification Mass is now on Youtube , Archdiocese of Detroit channel

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=THWE_dyXsoo
    Thanked by 1CharlesW
  • JahazaJahaza
    Posts: 461
    I can't help wondering if "stadium Masses" were a thing before Vatican II? Did people not see the need for tens of thousands of people at Mass together? Is there a value in it?

    Yes, they were.

    For example, Eucharistic Congress in New Orleans in 1938: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eucharistic_Congress#/media/File:CityParkStadiumEucharisticCongress1938.jpg
    Thanked by 1KARU27
  • dad29
    Posts: 1,537
    Speaking of opportunities lost: the church in which Fr. Casey said his first Mass does not mention that fact in their web "parish history" page.

    Could be that they haven't yet put it in there, I guess...but gee whillikers...