• does anyone know what font i need to have installed on a WinXP machine with Word 2003 in order to print the "dagger" symbol in pointed out psalms?

    thanks in advance.
  • I think if you click on "Insert" in the banner menu, you'll get a drop-down. Select "Symbol" and a dialogue box will come up. In the drop-down for font select "Normal text" and for the language select "Latin-1 Supplement" and you should find a dagger.

    I could be wrong, but give it a try.
  • hmm, in the Font drop-down menu, I only get the listing of installed Fonts . . . no "normal text" and I don't have anything called Latin-1. I'll keep looking though . . . thanks
  • Ok, sorry I was using 2007 and guessing for 2003, which I have on the computer in front of me.

    Try this: in the Font drop-down select Times New Roman, in the "Subset" drop down select "Latin Extended Additional". You should see the dagger symbol after all of the different quotation mark variants.
  • darn, i've got Basic Latin, Latin-1, Latin-Extended A and Latin-Extended B, none of which has the dagger. no Latin Extended Additional on my install. perhaps it's on the Office cd or something.
    thanks for your help, I'll keep looking.
  • priorstf
    Posts: 460
    Darth - I have a dagger in both Times and Arial (††)fonts. If you have a number pad on your keyboard you can get it by typing Alt-0134. I usually cheat and use the Character Map utility ( Start > All Programs > Accessories > System Tools > Character Map ) to find the odd characters I need. Running Windows XP Pro version 2002 Service Pack 2
  • Mark M.Mark M.
    Posts: 632
    On a Mac, it's just option-t.

    (Sorry… couldn't help but mention it.) :)
  • priorstf
    Posts: 460
    Mac? Isn't that the Linux box with the "Easy" button? ;-)
  • alt-0134 worked like a charm - thanks!
  • francisfrancis
    Posts: 8,870
    priorstf:

    My oldest son was about 16 when he blew off my longstanding tradition of teaching him what was the best platform. At that point in time, he said Windows was the way to go and dove into his own Windows system for a couple of years. Last year, he purchased his own Macbook. The prodigal came home.

    I would always tell him as he was growing up:

    You can either spend most of your time building the instrument on which to make music and when you are finished, make a little with the time you have left, or you can just spend all of your time making music. Which one do you want to do?!
  • chonakchonak
    Posts: 8,331
    That reminds me of the 1994 Umberto Eco column in which he opined on the religious sentiments he saw in the Macintosh and DOS systems:


    "The fact is that the world is divided between users of the Macintosh computer and users of MS-DOS compatible computers. I am firmly of the opinion that the Macintosh is Catholic and that DOS is Protestant. Indeed, the Macintosh is counter-reformist and has been influenced by the ratio studiorum of the Jesuits. It is cheerful, friendly, conciliatory; it tells the faithful how they must proceed step by step to reach -- if not the kingdom of Heaven -- the moment in which their document is printed. It is catechistic: The essence of revelation is dealt with via simple formulae and sumptuous icons. Everyone has a right to salvation.

    "DOS is Protestant, or even Calvinistic. It allows free interpretation of scripture, demands difficult personal decisions, imposes a subtle hermeneutics upon the user, and takes for granted the idea that not all can achieve salvation. To make the system work you need to interpret the program yourself: Far away from the baroque community of revelers, the user is closed within the loneliness of his own inner torment.

    "You may object that, with the passage to Windows, the DOS universe has come to resemble more closely the counter-reformist tolerance of the Macintosh. It's true: Windows represents an Anglican-style schism, big ceremonies in the cathedral, but there is always the possibility of a return to DOS to change things in accordance with bizarre decisions....

    "Naturally, the Catholicism and Protestantism of the two systems have nothing to do with the cultural and religious positions of their users. One may wonder whether, as time goes by, the use of one system rather than another leads to profound inner changes. Can you use DOS and be a Vande supporter? And more: Would Celine have written using Word, WordPerfect, or Wordstar? Would Descartes have programmed in Pascal?

    "And machine code, which lies beneath and decides the destiny of both systems (or environments, if you prefer)? Ah, that belongs to the Old Testament, and is talmudic and cabalistic...."
  • JamJam
    Posts: 636
    What about linux...? :(
  • francisfrancis
    Posts: 8,870
    Mac is Linux with a GUI on top.
  • JamJam
    Posts: 636
    So Linux is like the pre-schism church? haha.
  • francisfrancis
    Posts: 8,870
    well, sorta... but MAC still has all the sacraments while DOS has gone to hell.
  • priorstf
    Posts: 460
    And what exactly was Lisa?