Tiny Chant Scholars Working on Normal Sized Manuscripts
  • Adam WoodAdam Wood
    Posts: 6,362
    image

    Dr. Putian's research assistant, Tina Taiknee.
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  • Wow that is awesome! Thanks for sharing :)
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  • Liam
    Posts: 4,102
    Imagine those being held by a subdeacon....that would have been a hazing ritual.
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  • JulieCollJulieColl
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    Poor Dr. Lillie Putian. Things must be much easier for her in Lilliput.
    Thanked by 1matildac
  • Adam WoodAdam Wood
    Posts: 6,362
    image

    Here is a rare image from the Nearsighted Norbertines, a congregation of the Petite Premonstratensians.
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  • Liam
    Posts: 4,102
    They are recovering after auditioning for Bigger! Bolder! Better! remake of Monty Python and The Holy Grail:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YgYEuJ5u1K0
    Thanked by 1JulieColl
  • StimsonInRehabStimsonInRehab
    Posts: 1,655
    Talk about a Neum with a View.
  • JulieCollJulieColl
    Posts: 2,438
    I've seen a guest schola member beat his chest when he made a mistake, but beating one's head with a plank might be a bit noisy and awkward. : )
  • StimsonInRehabStimsonInRehab
    Posts: 1,655
    You're supposed to beat your chest and, if you're an Anglican chorister, raise your hand if you're the offending party. So your director knows. And can keep tabs on you.
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  • Chest beating.
    Head planking.
    Hand raising.
    And good monks genuflect.
    Thanked by 2JulieColl CHGiffen
  • JulieCollJulieColl
    Posts: 2,438
    My goodness. I had no idea.
  • francisfrancis
    Posts: 8,937
    How many tiny chant scholars does it take to lift a normal sized chant book?

    At times there probably weren't enough to lift the book and that is why the church at that time had so many castrati.
  • CHGiffenCHGiffen
    Posts: 4,415
    How many tiny chant scholars does it take to lift a normal sized chant book?
    Perhaps a score, but a quire might have been too much.
  • stulte
    Posts: 262
    Just the thought of lifting those books makes me hungry...for burritos! ;)
  • StimsonInRehabStimsonInRehab
    Posts: 1,655
    Burrtios are a quired taste.
    Thanked by 3stulte CHGiffen Carol
  • LenaH
    Posts: 31
    "....if you're an Anglican chorister, raise your hand if you're the offending party. So your director knows. And can keep tabs on you."

    My schola is not Anglican, however I do required those that make a mistake to hold up their hands. Many times though, I hear errors, yet I see no hands. Either the embarrassment is too great or they don't realize their errors.

    Love the pictures, Adam!
  • CHGiffenCHGiffen
    Posts: 4,415
    Holding up ones hand when one makes a mistake is an old tradition found in many choirs and choruses (including university choruses).
    Thanked by 1Ben Yanke
  • Liam
    Posts: 4,102
    It's twee.
  • chonakchonak
    Posts: 8,353
    It tells the director "I'm aware of this mistake and will watch for the passage next time".
  • StimsonInRehabStimsonInRehab
    Posts: 1,655
    It's twee.


    Like that's ever stopped me. I wear twee in the past tense on a regular basis.
  • Ben YankeBen Yanke
    Posts: 3,114
    Holding up ones hand when one makes a mistake is an old tradition found in many choirs and choruses (including university choruses).

    I've also seen it done in scholas where they'll do a discreet breast beating, as at the confiteor.
    Thanked by 2Adam Wood LenaH
  • Scott_WScott_W
    Posts: 456
    Their Itty Bitty Book light:

    image
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  • LenaH
    Posts: 31
    I might try that, Ben. I may get better results in members acknowledging their errors!
  • Ben YankeBen Yanke
    Posts: 3,114
    I might try that, Ben. I may get better results in members acknowledging their errors!


    It makes rehearsal much more efficient. If, as a director, you note that a singer has noted their own mistake, there's usually not a need to correct them later, and instead just keep going through.
    Thanked by 2StimsonInRehab LenaH
  • JL
    Posts: 170
    I have been known to raise a hand in the pew when I crash and burn on a hymn. The folks around me might think it's a little weird, but they're probably freaked out enough by somebody singing within hailing distance.
  • Adam WoodAdam Wood
    Posts: 6,362

    I've also seen it done in scholas where they'll do a breast beating, as at the confiteor.

    I understand that is an Benedictine tradition, and I remember reading (somewhere...) that it has been revived at Clear Creek.
  • BGP
    Posts: 213
    The Benedictine tradition, as I understand, is actually genuflecting before the Abbot when you make a mistake....
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  • francisfrancis
    Posts: 8,937
    A great way to encourage this type of self flagellation is for the director to always acknowledge his own mistakes. I think you will find the choir following your lead.
  • WGS
    Posts: 248
    I am accustomed to the breast beating (tapping) approach for the gentlemen whereas the boys raise a hand.

    However, the boys become habituated to this which might be a distraction when the choir is singing in the choir or singing in concert.

    Or would you prefer the monastic situation, where the penitent offender kneels in the midst of the choir and then awaits the abbot's releasing knock?
  • StimsonInRehabStimsonInRehab
    Posts: 1,655
    I imagine it'd be hard to sing in the venia position.
  • Adam WoodAdam Wood
    Posts: 6,362
    Just ran across this image of Fr. Thomas Thumb, O.S.B. (Order of Short Benedictines)

    As a chant lover, I'm fascinated by the ornate, but otherwise perfectly normal sized music book. As an aficionado of historical clerical dress, I'm fascinated by the delicate work that must have gone into making such a small habit and cloak.

    image
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  • At first I thought this was an April Fool's joke, but then I realized the first post was in June.
  • Kathy
    Posts: 5,220
    Adam doesn't need a special day.
  • WGS
    Posts: 248
    I have a feeling that some of the perusers of this forum might not be familiar with the long and illustrious career (as far back as the 16th century) of Tom Thumb before he entered into the Order of Short Benedictines. Look it up!
  • CatherineS
    Posts: 502
    These are great!

    I recall a monastery where if your error was yours alone you struck your chest, but if it caused any of your brothers to also make an error you genuflected. I might have missed further details.