Other composers not named James Mc.....
  • melofluentmelofluent
    Posts: 4,160
    A recent thread seeks to identify and profile contemporary composers of sacred/liturgical music that are worthy of our consideration. This proved a very worthwhile thread in that the list expands beyond what we can happily call the new usual suspects, MacMillan/Allen/LaRocca/Rice etc.
    We've also spent considerable time and effort identifying excellent work that enables smaller populated and voiced ensembles (SB SAT etc.) such as the little but mighty volume by Heath Morber of Eucharistic motets in English, as well as those found at Chuck's Choralwiki.
    I thought it might also be valuable to share other composers from other sources, not all necessarily RC-sponsored, that consistently provide smaller choirs with choice yet accessible literature. So here goes....
    If you are a St. James Press subscriber (the hands down best bargain in choral literature) you already know of the vast body of compositions by Richard Shepherd, Roland Martin and others of a fairly Anglican bent. I'd like to bring to everyone's attention Carson Cooman. We've prepared two of his miniature gems for Ascension and Pentecost, respectively "If ye love me" and "I will pour out My Spirit." I was attracted by Cooman's deft craft of weaving Part/Tavener-like melodies and textures that capture that sort of mystical, ethereal ethos that unites minimalism to polyphony and a kind of Orthodox gravity.
    Of course it may eventuate that not everyone will share like enthusiasm for Cooman's body of work, that's okay and normal. But I think sharing resources and "discoveries" of such writers in an ongoing dialogue would be very beneficial.
  • Tommy
    Posts: 6
    John Duggan
  • ronkrisman
    Posts: 1,367
    Thanks, Melo, for the info about Carson Cooman's (note spelling) music. I had been aware of some of his hymn tunes. I'll now look for his choral music.

    I find your listing James MacMillan as a liturgical composer "worthy of our consideration" somewhat strange. I possess a number of CD's of his large scale choral and orchestral works. (I have not yet gotten or heard his St. John's Passion.) Some VERY interesting writing. I'm especially fond of his Cantos Sagrados and Seven Last Words from the Cross. But there is very little "liturgical" music in his published opera. The couple of movements of his Mass for the Beatification of John Henry Newman posted on Youtube are completely lackluster, IMO. I think his "Tu Es Petrus" IS liturgical and quite fitting. But when is the Pope going to be visiting one of our parishes?
  • Sir James Macmillan has written lots of liturgical music. Look up is ouvre at his publisher Boosey and Hawkes. The three discs of his music by Cappella Nova on Linn Records are all liturgical music. There are a few discs by various choirs on the Hyperion Label, again all liturgical music. He is also very busy writing large sale concert works and operas, all well represented on disc too.
  • melofluentmelofluent
    Posts: 4,160
    Thanks for the spell check, Padre.
    The citation of our Scots friend was merely an acknowledgement of conventional wisdom found here and elsewhere. Apparently MacM's opi include very parish and modest-driven works for his own local ministry, none of which with I'm familiar. Your assessment is certainly welcome rebuttal to those who find his music apt for liturgy. I don't have a dog in that hunt.
    To humorously belabor the point, I'm sure there are numerable folks who think Landrey's ABBA FATHER is a pinnacle achievement in liturgical "composition."
  • Richard MixRichard Mix
    Posts: 2,536
    Agreed that Mass of Blessed John Henry Newman is disappointing, but I suppose Melo uses 'liturgical' music to mean more than Service settings. Within my reach are perusal copies I ordered of MacMillan's introit Give me justice (including a nice tone iv faburden for the verse), the Baptism Song Think how God loves you and a motet Nemo the condemnavit, all a cappella.
  • ronkrisman
    Posts: 1,367
    Thanks, maestrodicapella and Richard Mix, for the added information. I'll check it out and perhaps revise my opinion of MacMillan's "liturgical" music. I just hope no one uses his "On Love," with words by Kahlil Gibran. The Church in the US already went through the obsession with Gibran's poetry - in the 1970's!

    Also "opera" is the plural of "opus." Opi was on the Andy Griffith Show.
  • Andrew_Malton
    Posts: 1,068
    I think Sir James's In splendoribus would be wonderful for liturgy. That trumpet! The Nativity propers are not all silent night and peace on earth... It might still be going on when the Communion procession has ended, though, I guess.
  • melofluentmelofluent
    Posts: 4,160
    I had hoped to establish a thread that doesn't debate the merits of just one well-known composer. Have I failed already? Again, thanks Pater for the "fraternal" correction. Your knowledge is indeed bigger than mine. Most everyone's is as well.
  • CharlesW
    Posts: 11,674
    Opi was on the Andy Griffith Show.


    Sha-zam! That was a more innocent time, wasn't it.
  • CHGiffenCHGiffen
    Posts: 4,943
    FYI:
    Case \ Number Singular Plural
    Nominative Opus Opera
    Genitive Operis Operum
    Dative Operi Operibus
    Accusative Opus Opera
    Ablative Opere Operibus
    Vocative Opus Opera


    In English the plural of opus is often rendered as opuses, whereas opi appearing the plural of opus is pretty much restricted to informal usage in classical music (speculation: perhaps because opera has another meaning in music).
  • Adam WoodAdam Wood
    Posts: 6,428
    I always think of "opera" as a collective singular: "Bach's entire opera"
    Which is confusing, of course: "Mozart's entire opera. Yup, the WHOLE Magic Flute!"
  • melofluentmelofluent
    Posts: 4,160
    I've heard of that Mozart fellow.
    Thanked by 1CharlesW
  • chonakchonak
    Posts: 8,921
    FYI, some of Cooman's work was featured in that "Church and Culture" program on Protestant composers, to which I posted a link on the other thread; it's about 35 minutes into the program.
    Thanked by 2CHGiffen melofluent
  • francisfrancis
    Posts: 9,933
    I avoid opera altogether.
    Thanked by 2melofluent Salieri
  • CharlesW
    Posts: 11,674
    I avoid opera altogether.


    I could see you in a Viking helmet. LOL
    Thanked by 1Salieri
  • SalieriSalieri
    Posts: 3,100
    image
    Thanked by 1CharlesW
  • CHGiffenCHGiffen
    Posts: 4,943
    In Wisconsin, across the St Croix river from Minnesota, many of us Green Bay Packer fans refer to that football team from Minnesota as the Queens, not Vikings. Just sayin'.
  • StimsonInRehabStimsonInRehab
    Posts: 1,821
    So what you're saying, Charles, is that they're Viking Queens? Like the Valkyries?
  • CHGiffenCHGiffen
    Posts: 4,943
    No, just the Queens ... no viking connotation at all, lol.
  • eft94530eft94530
    Posts: 1,576
    This is liturgically appropriate because it has the word "Kyries"
    in it, right?

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DDd6rYKYoB0
  • melofluentmelofluent
    Posts: 4,160
    Heh, heh.....he said "keer eze"....heh heh.
    So much for this thread.
    Sink it, Richard.